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Music biz maxims you've learned


TommyRude

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In the long run, there is no amount of money that makes it worth playing with assholes.

 

In the short run, there's always a price. In the long run, because we play music for the joy of it, it is never worth sucking all the joy out of music. And playing with assholes long term is a guarantee to suck all the joy out of music.

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Every gig needs to give you at least one of:

 

- satisfactory pay

- musical growth

- great time with the other players

 

...and hopefully 2 of 3. 3 of 3 never lasts long.

 

If you don't have ANY of these 3, get the hell out of dodge. You're far better off staying home and practicing by yourself.

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There is more money in promotion than in playing. That doesn't necessarily mean that's the side of the business you should be on. But don't be surprised or shocked when you find out how much more the agent / manager / booker / promoter is making from the gig.
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1. If I have a feeling that by the first break Id pay back all of the nights earnings so I wouldnt have to be there for the second set, I dont do the gig.

 

2. The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.

 

3. Its a poor craftsman who blames his tools.

 

 

____________________________________
Rod

Here for the gear.

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As the bass player on the Titanic said to the drummer when the bandstand became flooded,

 

Screw this society beat - Im taking it out in 4

 

Jake

1967 B-3 w/(2) 122's, Nord C1w/Leslie 2101 top, Nord PedalKeys 27, Nord Electro 4D, IK B3X, QSC K12.2, Yamaha reface YC+CS+CP

 

"It needs a Hammond"

 

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Pretty female vocalist, with insecurities, and a broken moral compass.

 

This movie will not end well.

Which tees up the one I was about to mention:

"Don't dip your pen in the company ink."

Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

-Mark Twain

 

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Every gig needs to give you at least one of:

 

- satisfactory pay

- musical growth

- great time with the other players

 

...and hopefully 2 of 3. 3 of 3 never lasts long.

 

If you don't have ANY of these 3, get the hell out of dodge. You're far better off staying home and practicing by yourself.

Isn't it also important if anyone -- other than ourselves and bandmates -- are getting something out of our music?

 

I've had a restaurant/bar gig for the past four years that I recently quit -- tonight's my last gig. My bandmates are great, the music is rewarding (jazz organ trio), and the pay is satisfactory (i.e., it's better than most restaurant gigs). But, for the most part we're just background music. Worse than that, sometimes while we're playing the help will start making a racket to celebrate a customer's birthday -- we usually just stop playing at that point and I think to myself "What am I doing here?" The way I look at it if I'm going to play and no one is going to listen then I might as well play at home and forego the driving, schlepping of gear, and occasional sloppy/obnoxious drunk patron. I realize that not everyone can afford to say goodbye to the money and that I'm fortunate in that respect.

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Every gig needs to give you at least one of:

 

- satisfactory pay

- musical growth

- great time with the other players

 

...and hopefully 2 of 3. 3 of 3 never lasts long.

 

If you don't have ANY of these 3, get the hell out of dodge. You're far better off staying home and practicing by yourself.

 

My triangle is different but a similar idea:

 

-Money

-opportunity

-fun/satisfaction

 

Every gig has a calculus of these three factors. I haven't thought about this one in a few years thanks for bringing it up.

 

And another question: Has anyone ever had a gig that was 10/10 on all three points? I have had maybe 1 or 2 but it's pretty rare. Though fortunately many of my gigs these days score higher on each point than they used to, and that's a good thing.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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Every gig needs to give you at least one of:

 

- satisfactory pay

- musical growth

- great time with the other players

Isn't it also important if anyone -- other than ourselves and bandmates -- are getting something out of our music?

 

I've had a restaurant/bar gig for the past four years that I recently quit -- tonight's my last gig. My bandmates are great, the music is rewarding (jazz organ trio), and the pay is satisfactory (i.e., it's better than most restaurant gigs). But, for the most part we're just background music......I think to myself "What am I doing here?"

 

On my scale of:

 

-pay

-opportunity

-fun/satisfaction

 

this gig has both ceased to be much of an opportunity, and has now been seriously compromised on the 'fun/satisfaction' part. It's no wonder you quit the gig as you've had enough for now.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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Every gig needs to give you at least one of:

 

- satisfactory pay

- musical growth

- great time with the other players

 

...and hopefully 2 of 3. 3 of 3 never lasts long.

 

If you don't have ANY of these 3, get the hell out of dodge. You're far better off staying home and practicing by yourself.

I've always heard this as:

1. good money

2. good music

3. good hang

 

I quit a regular band/gig recently because I asked myself if any of those 3 were true and the answer was no. I would have stayed if at least 1 of the 3 was there. But no ...

These are only my opinions, not supported by any actual knowledge, experience, or expertise.
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Some great advice from Charlie Daniels' autobiography:

 

"Walk on stage with a positive attitude. Your troubles are your own and are not included in the ticket price. Some nights you have more to give than others, but put it all out there every show. You're concerned with the people who showed up, not the ones who didn't. So give them a show and Never look at the empty seats!"

Live: Yamaha S70XS (#1); Roland Jupiter-80; Mackie 1202VLZ4: IEMs or Traynor K4

Home: Hammond SK Pro 73; Moog Minimoog Voyager Electric Blue; Yamaha S70XS (#2); Wurlitzer 200A

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Every gig needs to give you at least one of:

 

- satisfactory pay

- musical growth

- great time with the other players

 

...and hopefully 2 of 3. 3 of 3 never lasts long.

 

If you don't have ANY of these 3, get the hell out of dodge. You're far better off staying home and practicing by yourself.

I've always heard this as:

1. good money

2. good music

3. good hang

Me, too. The Gig Rule of Three. Must have two of them, or no go.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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Has anyone ever had a gig that was 10/10 on all three points? I have had maybe 1 or 2 but it's pretty rare.

 

I can remember a few, but very rare. Last one was as the closing act at a local festival earlier this year.

- Huge, appreciative, good-tempered crowd

- Stretching but ultimately fulfilling song choices

- Talented musos with enough chill to be easy to get on with

- Very professional sound crew, who took everything in their stride with no stress

- Easy park-up just behind the stage

 

There aren't many of those.

 

Cheers, Mike.

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Never hire a singer who's only real experience performing is Karaoke.

 

I cannot count how many times a person is recommended to me based on some claims on how great they were at a Karaoke show. I give them an audition and no sense of timing, can't memorize lyrics, and a limited repertoire of songs. Combined with a false sense of competence because of how great their friends say they are, and no stage presence.

Boards: Kurzweil SP-6, Roland FA-08, VR-09, DeepMind 12

Modules: Korg Radias, Roland D-05, Bk7-m & Sonic Cell

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