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OT: Beer Question


Synthoid

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I recently watched a video of people lining up for hours to sample Pliny the Younger Triple IPA. Hours.

 

Honestly? :mad:

 

Since this beer is so rare I've obviously never tasted it, nor any other beer from Russian River Brewing Company for that matter, so my question for those that have sampled a "Pliny" would have to be... is it that good? What's so special?

 

 

 

 

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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I began home brewing 25 years ago or more, just to avoid the cost and craziness. The vast majority of craft beers that I've had are just "me too" versions of the same basic styles: Pale Ale, India Pale Ale, Porter, Stout, Oatmeal Stout, Imperial Stout, and Pilsner. There's little to distinguish one from another in most cases.

 

That's not to say they aren't better than Bud, Coors, Miller, etc. They are. But they've fallen into a different sameness, so to speak, in that they are different as a class from the mainstream brews, but similar to one another.

 

America has yet to develop a single, distinct, honest brew style of its own. The general pattern is:

1) Adopt an old world style and double the hops (frequently using Cascade hops as part or all of the hops bill).

2) Give it a weird/edgy name.

--optional--

3) Double the malt bill so the wort approaches (or exceeds) the strength generally referred to as barley wine. If they're calling it a "Triple" IPA, Pliny probably falls into this category.

 

I don't make any bones about it. I brew old world styles and I do it with care and quality ingredients (all grain, no kits). I'm not much of a competing sort of guy, but I've entered two competitions, both times as a lark. Took best of show in one and got a blue ribbon in the other.

 

Sadly, in the climate I live in, I absolutely can't brew in the summer--too many microorganisms to spoil batches. Winter works best for me...only we're not having winters any more. I didn't brew at all last season and only got a few batches in the year before. Now all my beer is gone and I'm reduced to buying stuff, which bums me considerably, as I'm missing my Barley Wine and my Belgian Triple sumpin' awful.

 

I'm desperate...but not so desperate that I'd wait hours in a line. That's silly, from my point of view. People are increasingly going for what I'm hearing called "peak experiences" and I guess waiting in line will be part of the story when they talk about the time they had Pliny the Younger. Makes it sound as though the beer was extra good if they had to wait for it, right? If it makes 'em happy, more power to 'em.

 

Here's hoping that we actually have winter this year (though the forecast doesn't look promising, dammit).

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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What's so special?

It's reputation plus supply and demand. It's brewed only once a year and is available only on draught. Triple IPA's are usually higher than 10% alcohol.

 

The magic in the best triple IPAs is how they remain quaffable by balancing the intense hop bitterness with an assertive alcohol presence.

 

So then, people can tell their friends how cool and hip they are because they stood in line to drink a beer. :cheers:

:nopity:
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At least beer doesn't have Russian hackers trying to steal your data.

 

Russian Imperial Stouts trying to steal your brain cells? That's another matter...

 

Grey

I'm not interested in someone's ability to program. I'm interested in their ability to compose and play.

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I like beer as much as the next guy but I can't fathom waiting in line like that for any beer. I also never really cared for Pliny but then again I generally don't go for high ABV beers. Beers tend to get sweeter as ABV goes up - you need a lot of sugars to keep the yeast alive.

 

I live in San Diego so it's kind of an embarrassment of riches as far as good beers go, especially since I like IPAs and hoppy pale ales and that's a thing here. Big fan of Alesmith .394 and of course Pineapple Sculpin always goes down easy.

 

This is like 25 years ago now, but my first trip to Europe was to Munich for Oktoberfest, with Prague and Vienna thrown in for good measure. And guess what: turns out I don't like German or Czech beer all that much. And especially not Belgian beer. Bleh, too sweet! Several years later I discovered English pub ales. That's where it's at for me. In London or in Wales I never had trouble finding something delicious.

 

There's a fairly newish brewery just a few miles from me called Modern Times and they've really got it going on. I pretty much have liked everything of theirs I've tasted, even styles that I don't usually go for. I don't know how much distribution they have outside of San Diego but give 'em a try if you get the chance.

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I'm sensitive to bitter tastes. That lets me out for craft beer, which makes me pucker up and make faces as they cram maximum hoppage in.

 

And I have been to the mountain - astounding fresh, clear, cool pilsners in Bavaria. So that lets me out for typical American swill.

 

:cry::hitt::Python:

Moe

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People wait for it because it's a once a year release and it's not available everywhere. For me there is 1 place in Philly that gets it, and they have the lines out the door to get 1 glass of it. My friend goes every year.

 

I'm fortunate to have a great local brewery/brew pub 2 miles from my house. Live music on the weekends, a great blues jam the 3rd Sunday of every month in the afternoon, and fantastic beers. They just released a bourbon barrel aged imperial stout that is just amazing.

 

I love the hoppy IPA beers but also enjoy the heavier stouts and porters, and also like the more seasonal stuff like Gose.

 

I've had Pliny the Elder (not as rare) in a bottle and it was pretty good. Those 2 are among the highest rated IPA brews every year. Worth an hour drive and a long line? Nah...

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People wait for it because it's a once a year release and it's not available everywhere. For me there is 1 place in Philly that gets it, and they have the lines out the door to get 1 glass of it.

 

Yeah it's like $12 for a small glass. No thanks.

 

I'll take Dogfish Head IPA any day of the week... :cheers:

 

 

 

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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I'm a coaster fan. Not happy when In-Bev stole AB and spun off the parks. Many Americans are now boycotting In-Bev and the big companies because of it. I made of list of beers I drink, scroll to the bottom of this page here to see them.

http://www.nogodforme.com/USA_Park_Coaster_Attendance_Results.htm

 

Local breweries are being bought out by the major companies, yet they don't want anyone to know. Where I live, Funky Buddha was the latest brewery bought out, but at least it was by Constellation brands (3rd largest in the USA) and not In-Bev.

 

If your local brewery has a few locations, and beer in the grocery stores, they'll probably be bought out soon. I try to support the local breweries not owned by a major company.

 

 

Korg 01W/FD, Hammond XK-2, Neo Ventilator2, JBL Eon, Rhodes 88
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The latest review for Cisco Brewing in Nantucket. My nephew started this about 18 years ago. His slogan is Great Beer if You can Get it,

 

https://www.menshealth.com/guy-wisdom/cisco-brewers-nantucket-dream-job

Jimmy

 

Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others. Groucho

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I checked out your list and noticed it includes Ballast Point Sculpin - on of my faves - but not exactly your local microbrewery anymore since Constellation Brands bought them out for a b-b-b-billion bucks.

Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

-Mark Twain

 

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Not sure if it's like this in the States, but over here an abundance of "craft" beers have exploded on to the scene over the past few years.

 

The typical profile of the new breed of beers is:

- very heavily hopped

- come in a bottle so small you could snort the contents

- have an esoteric name like "the hairy dog's nuts IPA"

 

For younger people here, drinking beer has become a question of fashion, and it's important to have the correct bottle to match your particular version of the bushy beard, lack of socks and geometrically perfect sleeve tattoo.

 

So to tack my way back to OP's point, I could definitely see the beautiful people lining up for the latest ferment here too.

 

I admit to also having queued for beer (as mentioned in another thread), but that has purely been caused by supply and demand issues at the cricket/football.

 

Australian males in my (Gen X+) social circle do not contemplate the IBU of our ale while we thoughtfully preen our facial hair. We slam it down with haste between overs while calculating who's shout is next.

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I checked out your list and noticed it includes Ballast Point Sculpin - on of my faves - but not exactly your local microbrewery anymore since Constellation Brands bought them out for a b-b-b-billion bucks.

 

http://s2.quickmeme.com/img/c3/c3305497a908aed0e1792f5d6be8bb85b8878081952e9874ad45fe22692451d0.jpg

 

Yup. And got booted from the San Diego Brewers Guild. I haven't noticed any decline in quality, though I imagine that will come. It's cool that so far they've kept the Home Brew Mart open which is how the business started.

 

 

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In that world there is an obsession about adding more and more hops that I can't really understand... sometimes it seems that you are drinking cold alcoholic tea!!! I hope the trend is cyclical and it reverses itself to a more balanced beer style. I am particularly fan of British ales ala Innis and Gunn, Fuller's or Greenall's and it's hard to find those styles in the US micro-breweries.

 

Here in our town we have a local brewery, which in itself is great, but, apart of a really great summer wheat beer, all the rest are "over-hopped" by a mile.

 

Fran

 

 

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I checked out your list and noticed it includes Ballast Point Sculpin - on of my faves - but not exactly your local microbrewery anymore since Constellation Brands bought them out for a b-b-b-billion bucks.

 

Right, a few of my selections are owned by major companies. I have to keep checking if any have been bought out by In-Bev. They keep this stuff secret. I have to check the wiki and news reports to see who owns each brewery.

 

When a local brewery is bought out, the beer doesn't change at first, but if In-Bev takes over, they eventually move the processing to a new facility. In-Bev did this with Goose Island and basically turned it into water. Here's an article that talks about Goose Island.

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-deal-that-shook-craft-beer-five-years-ago-is-still-reverberating-2016-04-21

 

Most In-Bev beers are 5% or less. IPAs are 6-7% on average, double and triples are 8-10%. You don't have to drink as much beer to get a buzz. So yes, it costs more up front, but that's because they're using more ingredients.

 

I usually have a variety at home, start at 5%, and work my way up to the good stuff. In-Bev is like a big bully trying to take over. Look at the beers on your grocery store shelf and In-Bev gets 2-3 slots per brand while the local mom and pop brewery only get 1. Look at the taps at most bars and they will be In-Bev brands, unless you're in a local tap room or brewpub that includes food.

 

It's a fine line when your local beer goes national as to whether it's still craft or not. I think everything by In-Bev needs to move out of the craft section of the grocery store shelf. If you read articles on this stuff, you'll find others who want the "craft" label taken away from a beer once it goes national.

Korg 01W/FD, Hammond XK-2, Neo Ventilator2, JBL Eon, Rhodes 88
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I do it the opposite way- start heavy, then gauge where I'm at and either keep going heavy or lighten up. :)

Live: Korg Kronos 2 88, Nord Electro 5d Nord Lead A1

Toys: Roland FA08, Novation Ultranova, Moog LP, Roland SP-404SX, Roland JX10,Emu MK6

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Ran down to my local micro-brew pub to get a growler of a limited edition beer called Hops Are My CoPilot. From Draftmag.com Read:

 

"Hops Are My Co-pilot

Tombstone Brewing Co.

For people who live on the east side of Phoenix, the Valleys western half is like the shadowy place in The Lion King: You must never go there, Simba. But there are a few places for which a beer geek will brave the journey; Ground Control in Litchfield Park is definitely among them. The lauded beer bar recently celebrated its tenth anniversary, and to celebrate, head beer guru Ian Harwell collaborated with local brewers on several new creations, including Superstition Meaderys Coffee Blueberry Hex (a blueberry melomel with Ground Control coffee), Dark Sky Brewing Co.s High Country Brunch (an imperial stout with maple syrup and more Ground Control coffee) and Borderlands Brewing Co.s Sitting in a Tin Can (a hazy double IPA). Our favorite of the collabs, though, was this imperial IPA brewed with Cashmere, Idaho 7 and Cascade hops. The nose changes with temperature: Its incredibly grapefruity at first, like a just-sliced peel, but warmth brings out crystallized pineapple and peach juice with a side of Wheaties and glazed donuts. Mown grass emerges with a swirl of the glass. Sips stay true to the warmed-up aromaat least until the swallow, when dripping peach, angel food cake and mango rind burst forth. Warm vanilla rises between sips, as does a surprising amount of pithy, grassy, slightly rough bitterness; it digs into the tongue in a way were not used to with the style. It may not look like mucha shade or two darker and this would be pond waterbut dammit if it doesnt have everything we want in a New England IPA."

 

I don't drink beer that often because of the mega-caloric intake, but when I do, I don't mind getting something special. I love wines too but beer seems to have much more variety and character.

 

After a "Hops Are My CoPilot", there's no way you can go back and drink a Blue Moon with a slice of lemon...it just seems bland.

You want me to start this song too slow or too fast?

 

Forte7, Nord Stage 3, XK3c, OB-6, Arturia Collection, Mainstage, MotionSound KBR3D. A bunch of MusicMan Guitars, Line6 stuff

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My brother, a drummer, makes nice beers which I sample with him as I'm able. He doesn't get carried away with the hops. I make wine from an indigenous grape, scuppernong, a white muscadine. I believe these were enjoyed by the Cherokees. Sometimes I'll make it carbonated by sealing in a plastic container towards the end of fermentation.
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I once made a sparkling wine from the finest of ingredients - Welch's Frozen Concentrated Grape Juice, and a packet of ordinary baker's yeast.

 

I put it in ordinary glass coke bottles (the big ones you haven't seen for 30 years), sealed them with wax, and put them up for a year.

 

It carbonated nicely and might as well have been Cold Duck.

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

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The Greeks make a wine called Retsina, a white wine flavored with the resin of the Alleppo pine tree. Some folks believe they originally did this to make their wine unsuitable to invading Romans. If you haven't tried it, it's interesting. I find wines can embody the flavor of the grape or whatever other fruit nicely, so I find wines at least as interesting as beer. How is American beer like making love in a canoe?
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Back on topic?

 

There are 5 or so major microbreweries in my locale. I won't comment on the beer (I can't drink beer, but everyone else seems happy). Seems like citrus beer is a thing in Florida, as are tropical lagers.

 

Happy hipsters, plus older folks.

 

All I can say is that they hire bands on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Our best gigs these days are in microbreweries. A cool crowd comes out, we entertain them.

 

All good.

 

The owners are happy with us, and book us out 12 months. Pay is increasing over time. The $300 gig is now $400, and heading to $500. Doesn't suck.

 

One them upgraded to a new space. Asked us about stages, acoustics, amplification. I provided very detailed feedback. They listened, and complied. Looking forward to playing there in a few weeks!

 

The others in town are starting to take band relationships more seriously. Even a bit of competition, which is good.

 

Hey, if microbreweries are the new thing for bands, I'm all in!!

Life is too short to be playing bad music.

 

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