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Average Age????


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Dont be scare now. How old were you when you got your first professional gig playing keyboards? Ill be 45 in about 2 or 300 hours and Im still a beginner. I dont think Ill be gigging til Im near fifty. Casey

 

P.S. Please try to be encouraging, I need it.

 

This message has been edited by kcbass on 10-20-2001 at 01:45 PM

 "Let It Be!"

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We played a few times in my high school, but the 1st 'gig' I would consider was playing in a club, and we actually got paid. I was 15 or 16. We actually ran out of songs to play (I think our set list by then was only about 10 songs), and we actually repeated two songs. It's great to be a teenager, no matter how much you suck you want to play live anyways http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

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mmmmm...

I was 14th when I joined my first "covers" band. Yes, I got paid so I consider it my first "pro" gig...

 

I'm 29 right now.

 

Hey KCBASS, Music is what keep us all alive. Let's do it till the end of the times, ok? ...

 

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kcbass, you're not alone. I'm 28 and my first gig is planned for a couple of decades from now :o I have been mostly into sport until a serious health problem virtually destroyed my knee and changed everything in my life. So since...1 year and a half ago, I started getting serious with keyboard and music in general. I had always liked music but sport was always first. Also, when I was a teenager I wanted a keyboard but I had no money - later I was able to buy one, but I had very few time for it. Now many things have changed, and music is the only positive change there has been in my life in the last 3 years.

 

Kcbass, maybe if I put a lot of effort into it I can catch you, so that we can do our first gig together http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gifhttp://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gifhttp://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

 

 

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= blue =

 

This message has been edited by Blue on 10-20-2001 at 06:26 PM

= blue =
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Old enough to been through the rise fall and resurrection of analog synths. Old enough has have sold the Mini-moog(who knew?). Old enough to know what digital is better at (CHORDS). AND I fervently hope to get old enough to see analog die again. And maybe actually see people learn to play the keys again.
Q:What do you call a truck with nothing in the bed,nothing on the hitch, and room for more than three people in the cab? A:"A car"....
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I was 13 & got a gig at the local "Drop In" centre. I was 15 & started doing the Junior High circuit, 17 & was doing some high profilers. One high profiler I did back in '73, I did again just last weekend. The drummer, the owner, & I were standing at the soundboard when the drummer commented on the owner's shirt. It was about the place's 55th anniversary. I said I know people that played here that have died of old age, that's how long this place has been around. Those that haven't done their first gig, don't let fear & common sense get in the way, just jump in with both feet. If you don't you'll never do it!!!

Steve

 

www.seagullphotodesign.com

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Originally posted by Brian Leary:

Old enough to make money by making thunder rattling the reverb under a Farfisa organ (I was 12)

 

Too funny! I always just kicked my Ace-Tone amp for thunder...

 

Trivia question - Ace-Tone was the first company started by the man who started what current big musical instrument company?

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

 

Affiliations: Cloud Microphones • Music Player Network 

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Trivia question - Ace-Tone was the first company started by the man who started what current

big musical instrument company?

 

A guess, probably wrong...Carvin?

 

My very first "Gig" was in Memphis, TN, people would throw change at me for dancing in front of the stage while the bands played. I was 4 years old. Needless to say, I can't dance for shit now. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

 

First real Paid "Gig" as a keyboardist was when I was 10, doing mostly covers for big parties and weddings playing keys with my older brothers.

 

When I was 11 I got 4 church gigs playing organ...every Weekend my Mom and I would play 4 Catholic masses all at different churches (1 Sat. night, 3 on Sunday)...it paid for my first 2 synths (Sequential Circuits Prophet 600 and a Roland Juno 106) as well as Cigarettes and Beer...I was a "baaaddd" kid who grew up way to young.

 

I worked just about every kind of gig imaginable (semi-pro, amature, all- pro) until I was 26. Now I'm 29 and do the occasional recording session or a private party here and there but music really don't pay my bills anymore. Now I just make it for the love.

 

 

This message has been edited by Steve LeBlanc on 10-21-2001 at 01:52 PM

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I could be wrong, but I believe that Roland is the answer to your question, Dave.

Then again, a small but vociferous part of my noggin says "No, no, no......that would be Korg."

Ace-tone had some excellent stuff in their day. Some of the earliest Japanese solid-state equipment I ever saw. I particularly remember their powered mixers. Fabulous concept and functionally well-executed (late 60's)

 

Ah yes, the juvenile delight of spring reverb. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/wink.gif

The most outlandish ones I ever saw were the big honkers they put in the Hammond organ tone cabinets. Draped in a U-shape, they had to have been a good 4 feet in length. I could never get past the solemnity of their location (a church, or an uppity organ showroom) to rock & roll one to the imagined (and mischieviously desired) state of thunderous cacaphony. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

 

This message has been edited by Jeep on 10-21-2001 at 02:03 PM

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That company is Roland. It was written up in Keyboard once upon a time.

I also have used reverb thunder; we used hit the cabinet of an big Yamaha

guitar amp. Of course it was an accident the first time.

Q:What do you call a truck with nothing in the bed,nothing on the hitch, and room for more than three people in the cab? A:"A car"....
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I was 18 when I was playing for tips in some of the local bars. You could still drink at 18 in NY back then.

 

I was 24 when I started making enough money in a cover band so as not to need a day job.

 

I quit when I turned 28 and have not played in a professional situation since.

 

I'm 36 now.

 

Carl

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I was 10 when I first started taking lessons. Right away they trained me to be a church musician. I didn't get paid with cash at that time. They paid me with "chicken sandwiches" (Man, I missed those days). As my progress evolved and I was able to teach choirs, I was placed on salary. I'm 40 years old now. And always had a gig to play, whether in the church or outside of it. Thanks for asking this questioned. It made me look back on my roots.
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Did my first recital on a memorable night: December 8, 1980 (can anyone tell me what else happened on that night?).

 

I was 14 for my first paying gig. In fact, as a performing musician, I made all of my money (roughly $4.93 total) between 14 and 23. Pretty young to retire, huh? http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

 

I did a bunch of work playing on people's records since then (still do...did it this weekend) and engineering records. But yes, I actually got myself and my band booked at 14, which was cool except twice, I got kicked out of clubs I was playing because I was under 21!

 

33 now...busy being a respectable business guy with a family. And guess what? I want to gig again! I miss it, and my pal and I are going to scrape together some other geeks and take our show on the road! Well, as long as I'm within 20 miles of home and sleep in my own bed evey night. No touring with a 2-year-old at home.

 

- Jeff

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Let see... the first time I got paid to play was in college. The band was called Organized Crime. I was 19, I think. I played in a couple more bands (parties, etc.) until I was about 25 and then moved to L.A. to work in the recording industry. That ended my playing for money.

 

I'm 37 now and haven't played in front of people in 12 years. I'm planning to get back on stage in a year or so. That should be an experience.

 

Seems like a lot of people are in the same boat as I am. That's encouraging. I do enjoy this forum.

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Originally posted by Jeff, TASCAM Guy:

Did my first recital on a memorable night: December 8, 1980 (can anyone tell me what else happened on that night?).- Jeff

 

John Lennon was killed that night... right?

Músico, Productor, Ingeniero, Tecnólogo

Senior Product Manager, América Latina y Caribe - PreSonus

at Fender Musical Instruments Company

 

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I was about 13 or 14 when I got paid (I think it was a high school mothers club fashion show). Me and my Rhodes. My mom didn't appreciate my playing "Baby Elephant Walk" when it was her turn to move down the runway... but my dad thought it was funny.

 

First bar gig - 15. It wasn't the one we were supposed to play (the 17 year old guitar player got thrown out of that one for trying to pass a fake ID). I never had a problem playing bars that young - probably because I looked so young - and the bouncers generally protected me.

 

First paying session - 24

 

Best paying single gig - 40

 

Today - 40 and still gigging.

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Started taking piano lessions at age 6. Trumpet at age 8. Played trumpet in all types of jazz/brass type bands untill my senior year in high school(military academy) Got to jam with some member of the US Marine Corps band after they performed at my school. While talking with one and telling him of my desire to play trumpet professionally he told me good trumpet players were a dime a dozen, but if you could play keyboards, you will always be in demand. Boy, was he right! I gigged full time from 18 till 25(and also got a degree),took 17 years off to raise a family and now have been playing again for the past 3 years. I'm 45 now and loving it more than ever!

Kurzweil PC3, Hammond SK-1 + Ventilator, Korg Triton. 2 JBL Eon 510's.

 

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KCBass, we hired a new lead guitarist, age 47, about three months ago. As a teenager he and three buddies put together a band, got their first gig, and two of the guys quit before the gig. He and the other member went thru with the gig anyway, and the manager basically told them they sucked to their face. He hadn't played in a band since (20+ years!!) and auditioned with us without thinking he'd actually take the job. He played for us, made a few mistakes (so he fit right in!) but had a great attitude and we kept him. He's playing better and better each gig, and his wife, who was opposed to it at first, now attends quite a few gigs and is having a blast! So GO for it!

Botch

"Eccentric language often is symptomatic of peculiar thinking" - George Will

www.puddlestone.net

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I did my first paying gig at 17. It was also the band's first gig. I played for my high school's Christmas dance and made $45, which wasn't bad money in 1977. We started paying dues a month later when we were playing a weekend in some toilet. The club owner refused to pay us Friday night, so we said we wouldn't be back the next night unless he paid up. He tried to call our bluff, so we started packing up. It got ugly. We ended up calling the Sheriff to supervise as we loaded out. Everytime we passed him with a load, he'd try to pick a fight. Ah, the old club days! http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/eek.gif

 

Now I'm 41 and have been making my living as a full time keyboardist in Las Vegas for about 10 years now. Like everyone else, I've got my little bedroom studio. I get enough projects to make hobby income, but playing live is still my bread and butter.

 

BTW, I also fondly remember the old spring reverb "explosion" effect. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

In the band I mentioned above I worked with another keyboardist who played back to back with me. He used to lift the amp head up a few inches and drop it when I wasn't looking. Scared the SHIT out of me! I'd get even by moving the pitch wheel on his Minimoog when he wasn't looking! http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

 

Trivia; Can anyone identify the model organ he had? It was a double manual Farfisa, kind of a lime green color. The coolest thing about it was a feature they called "Syntheslalom". It had a drawbar that you'd pull out, hit a chord, and the notes would slide up to the notes you were playing. The further out the drawbar, the slower the portamento. I'd never seen that model before, or since. Had drawbars for the upper manual, didn't sound too bad through a Leslie. Anybody?

 

Peace all,

Steve

><>

Steve

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i was about 17 i think. i played in a concert for a youth organisation and there were about 3500 teenagers there so it was great. but i'm nearly 25 and i'm thinking i'm getting too old. whenever i think that i think:

ben folds (rockin' the suburbs) is 35 and he hasn't been going for too long (he rocks)

metallica and U2 must be in their 40's, and they continue to make music that has young people jumpin'

all the classical pianists that i have recordings of are not under 40.

KCBASS YOU CAN DO IT DUDE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

don't worry when you see little kids like aaron carter who haven't reached puberty yet, there's a future for you dude. i read somewhere today that richard strauss didn't start making good music until he was 50.

KEEP YA HEAD UP!

"Consider how much coffee you're drinking - it's probably not enough."
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Yet another Farfisa confession...I got a single manual red one during the

great Farfisa revival of the 80's(it was polyphonic and I couldn't swing a polymoog!) the really cool thing about it was if you held down a chord and swithched the organ off the pitch would climb and fade out as things shut down. Sort of like a psuedo Patrick Moraz effect.

Speaking of age most of Depeche Mode is lurking around 40 and Vince Clarke is proably getting near there. These guys can still blow Prodigy into the weeds!

Q:What do you call a truck with nothing in the bed,nothing on the hitch, and room for more than three people in the cab? A:"A car"....
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I think the first gig I ever got paid for, I was about 18yrs old. My "rig" consisted of a Rhodes 73 stage piano and a Roland RS-09 string/organ synth.
Our country is not the only thing to which we owe our allegiance. It is also owed to justice and to humanity. Patriotism consists not in waving the flag, but in striving that our country shall be righteous as well as strong: James Bryce
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