Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

does a baldwin school a steinway?


surfjazz

Recommended Posts



  • Replies 87
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Too bright, action's too sloppy, and their pinblocks aren't strong enough. K. Kawai, Yamaha, and Steinway all mop up the floor with it.

 

So THERE!

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gifhttp://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gifhttp://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gifhttp://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gifhttp://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

Setup: Korg Kronos 61, Roland XV-88, Korg Triton-Rack, Motif-Rack, Korg N1r, Alesis QSR, Roland M-GS64 Yamaha KX-88, KX76, Roland Super-JX, E-Mu Longboard 61, Kawai K1II, Kawai K4.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I play a Baldwin SD10 at my school. The touch is equivalent to the Model D Steinway, but has faster repetition and the tone in my opinion is just as good. The biggest concern with Baldwin is that they lack quality control so while one model may be great, another model with a different serial number could be plagued with problems.

 

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No way. Baldwin and Steinway are uncomparable. How can Baldwin school Steinway if Yamaha completely blows it away? I've played on many concert grand Steinways and Baldwins alike and dislike the Baldwin's touch and sound, and in no way does it compare to the Steinway's brilliance.
"Bach is ever new"-Glenn Gould
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The newer Baldwin SD-10 concert grand models are made under strict quality control, unlike their smaller models. There is a great deal of care, material quality, and craftsmanship, which goes into these instruments. The SD-10 concert grand model does feature a German made "Renner" action, which is considered to be the very best by many. I have had an SD-10 for over six years and it holds its tuning exceptionally well, with no pin slipping.

 

I also very much like the Steinway Model D, but cannot honestly say that one is better than the other. Both of these instruments have a wonderful sound which is distinctive and unique. I am equally happy playing either of these instruments.

 

In addition to Dave Brubeck, Baldwin is also the preferred piano of Marian McPartland and George Shearing. All of these musicians have their special unique sound playing these Baldwins, which would not be the same on a Steinway. Musicians of this caliber would not be influenced by a piano company to play a Baldwin, rather than a Steinway.

 

Kip

Bardstown Audio

www.bardstownaudio.com

 

 

 

This message has been edited by Bardstown Audio on 09-30-2001 at 06:51 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, both instruments hold their own true sounds. But, I dislike the Baldwin's bright sound(with a pretty easy touch, at least in my mind) to the Steinway's easily controlable action and smooth, clear sound. The Baldwin may be more suitable for certain kinds of music, but I couldn't see it being applied to "soft" pieces, such as a Chopin nocturne or such. I don't know if I'm familier with this SD10 but if it's been out for 6 years I am probably thinking of the same piano. For that price range I think that Yamaha makes a more versatile piano. However, both companies provide a good piano for the begginning student and are good first choices. The Steinway products obviously run VERY expensive and should only be considered by serious musicians who want to play boroque(spelling?) classical, or romantic music, which I do, so my choice will be altered accordingly http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/wink.gif.
"Bach is ever new"-Glenn Gould
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Living in Europe, I didn't have a chance to play a lot of Baldwins (they're rarely seen here), but the few I did play didn't feel very good to me. I much, MUCH prefer Steinway, especially the German ones, frankly. The best piano I played is a Bosendorfer Imperial I found in Buenos Aires, but I realize it's not for every kind of music. I find the Yamahas of the last 10 years to be consistently good, really close to Steinway quality now.

I think nothing beats a good-feeling, well-regulated Steinway for expressivity and versatility. But I also found some badly maintained Steinways that were hell to play! They can give you a constantly crashing sound, and I like to have that only when I pound...

Another piano firm that's widely adopted in Europe is Shimmel; I think they're very good for classic and romantic music, but maybe a bit dark for American tastes.

I had an amazing experience when I played at the Embassy of France in Rome - They gave me a Yamaha that was so responsive and easy to play, it seemed to read my mind. I wish I can remember the model number - It was one of the expensive ones with complicated names. Maybe I should have tried to buy it, but I was afraid to ask the price http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif... Plus, it was TOO easy, I think you need some resistance to your will when you practice! Otherwise you get spoiled, and you don't want to play the crap pianos that you find on the road anymore... http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

 

marino

 

BTW I seem to remember there was a thread about the best pianos from several months ago... I'll try to retrieve it from the old pages. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by marino:

The best piano I played is a Bosendorfer Imperial I found in Buenos Aires, but I realize it's not for every kind of music.

 

I've gotten to play the Bosie Imp. only 3 times in my life. This one time I was at a party at a very wealthy family's house. They loved it when I played Mussorgsky, Chopin, or Mozart, but more than one person looked askance at me (like it's some kind of sacred cow or something) when I played "Benny the Bouncer," after sombeody asked for some "modern music." Most got into it, though. Great big beastie, that.

 

The other 2 times were for recitals. I warmed up with...

You guessed it - "Benny the Bouncer." (Partly.)

Setup: Korg Kronos 61, Roland XV-88, Korg Triton-Rack, Motif-Rack, Korg N1r, Alesis QSR, Roland M-GS64 Yamaha KX-88, KX76, Roland Super-JX, E-Mu Longboard 61, Kawai K1II, Kawai K4.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 years later...
Wow, you've been busy, digging up an 8 year old thread. :D

 

Bah! More like seven and a quarter... :D

 

Actually, I was just doing a search to see if there was anything on here regarding a Baldwin sample library (I've seen all sorts of pianos sampled but never a Baldwin) and came across this thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Baldwin used to make world class pianos comparable to Steinway. Some old Baldwins are still great. And their pin blocks were superior/stayed in tune longer. I had an old Acrosonic that stayed in tune for 3 years once. But the company changed and the quality went way downhill a while back. I haven't tried a new Baldwin to see how they are now - hopefully they've improved.

 

Each piano is different, although Yamaha's seem to be more consistent. Mason & Hamlin also made some great pianos. I've played and recorded on Bosendorfer, and got a Steinway. I'd like to play a Fazioli, but haven't had the chance yet.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This doesn't prove anything - all just personal anecdotes.

 

Best Baldwin I remember playing was an SD-10 at Sherman Clay in San Francisco years ago. I did think it came very close to the best I'd played. On the Yamaha side, I still remember playing an S that was exquisite. A few Masons have really seemed to sing for me, too. Can't say I've found a Bosendorfer yet that wanted to cooperate with me. Agree that Steinways seem to have a wide variation in quality, and would guess most of us have the experience of finding some where the highest quality element of the piano was the name on the fallboard.

 

But at least for me, the few "to die for" pianos I've played have all been Steinways. One was an M, another an L, and a few others over two decades. In my limited experience, when they get it right, they really get it right.

 

Also, all this may really reveal is the limits of my own ability to produce a singing tone on different instruments.

..
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I look at pianos like cars-they always need regular maintenance and fine tuning.

 

I'm certainly not an Autophile type guy with my non-turbo '91 Volvo 740 wagon with 173K. My mechanic works on just Volvos, both old and newer ones just out of warranty. People will drive all the way across town from Santa Monica to Pasadena to have this guy service their car. He and his mechanics are very meticulous, they know Volvos inside and out.

 

If you owned say a Porsche, Mercedes or BMW, you wouldn't want some independent mechanic who just does work on American cars giving your car a major tuneup.

https://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

2005 NY Steinway D

Yamaha AvantGrand N3X, P-515

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

If you owned say a Porsche, Mercedes or BMW, you wouldn't want some independent mechanic who just does work on American cars giving your car a major tuneup.

 

I own a '54 Oldsmobile and a '61 Cadillac,and my brother owns a '51 Hudson and a '63 Studebaker,and I perform all the maintenance.

I used to work on Volvos (544 and 122) but now I hate'em,so you don't have to worry about me ever touching your precious car :rolleyes:

 

as far as Baldwin versus Steinway,unless Steinway or Bosendorfer etc. starts making an electric version I won't have anything to base a comparison on :P

 

 

(disclaimer;that's not me playing,but it's the only video I could find of someone playing an Electropiano like mine)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I own a Baldwin Artist Grand Model R. It's the best feeling, and most beautiful sounding piano I've ever played. On the other hand, I've played some Baldwins that were awful in every way. In my experience, no two Baldwins are created equally.
Reality is like the sun - you can block it out for a time but it ain't goin' away...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to work on Volvos (544 and 122) but now I hate'em,so you don't have to worry about me ever touching your precious car :rolleyes:

 

I certainly wouldn't refer to it has precious, more like reliable and functional for schlepping gear. I keep looking but nothing out there has ever seemed like a good replacement. (I've never been comfortable with the SUVs) I just keep putting the money into it over the years for the thing to stay running smooth. If I did have the expertise to work on cars, I'd save a ton of dough. But I figure that all money I've saved in not having car payments all these years was better put into more important things......like pianos.

https://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

2005 NY Steinway D

Yamaha AvantGrand N3X, P-515

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I certainly wouldn't refer to it has precious, more like reliable and functional for schlepping gear.

 

Sorry if I seem a bit oversensitive about this,but i tend to read certain implications into being a "mechanic" that works on American cars,as opposed to being a "technician" of fine European craftmanship.

 

I won't have to worry about it much longer I suppose,when the Big Three are gone I'll be an "Automotive Historical Preservationist".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BTW, does a Volvo "school" a Camry? :)

 

Kinda like a RD 700GX tutors a CP300.

 

What famous Swede or Swedes played the Baldwin Electro Piano from the 70s?

 

Bjorn Borg v.s. Seiji Ozawa v.s. Bob Seger in a 5K Road race-who wins?

 

Does Nord school Yamaha?

 

How about Kawai schooling Peavey?

 

Who would be a better tuner for a German Steinway-

Ted Nugent or Ingrid Bergman ?

https://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

2005 NY Steinway D

Yamaha AvantGrand N3X, P-515

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

What famous Swede or Swedes played the Baldwin Electro Piano from the 70s?

 

 

ABBA? :confused:

 

In Sweden there are large numbers of people who drive classic American cars,in fact I personally know one of them who comes here on a regular basis to purchase cars and spare parts by the container load,and that's in the country that builds Volvos.

 

:wave:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Does this SCHOOL that", is this a west coast thing (School). What the ?@#$. I've never heard that phrase used.

Does this have something to do with Zeppelin lyrics because Plant won?

 

I had an idea over the weekend to afix a 1955 Thunderbird front fender to the rear of an Upright Piano or a B3. It just popped into my head, very weird! I think I may be having 80's flashbacks or it could just be residual damage from having watched most of the Grammys last week! :snax:

 

http://tbn2.google.com/images?q=tbn:SZ5aQcT2Re2TxM:http://www.annualclassiccarraffle.com/FrontFender.jpg

 

 

SP6, CP-50, FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, XK-3, CX-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...