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It's amazing how well the EP sound has held up...


Sundown

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Hey all,

 

I doubt Harold Rhodes would have thought that his recuperative teaching device for wounded soldiers would still be strong 60 years after it's inception. Benjamin Miessner would be similarly surprised about the Wurlitzer equivalent.

 

Most non-musicians born after 1980 don't know what a tine or reed EP is, but they have surely heard one. I was listening to the radio the other day and heard Train's "Hey, Soul Sister" playing, and sure enough, buried beneath the bridge is an EP emulation. That's just a quick example...

 

Laurens Hammond probably didn't expect the cult following that tone wheel organs have enjoyed either.

 

I suspect in 50 years we will still be talking about these specific instruments.

 

Todd

Sundown

 

Working on: The Jupiter Bluff; They Live, We Groove

Main axes: Kawai MP11 and Kurz PC361

DAW Platform: Cubase

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Most non-musicians born after 1980 don't know what a tine or reed EP is, but they have surely heard one.
To be fair, I'm not sure many non-musicians born before 1980 would know, either. They are just keyboards to most people.

 

I am glad the appreciation of these classics continues. I see acts of all ages and generations using these. Heck, if these things weren't popular, I don't think Nord would have gotten where they are today.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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Most non-musicians born after 1980 don't know what a tine or reed EP is, but they have surely heard one.
To be fair, I'm not sure many non-musicians born before 1980 would know, either. They are just keyboards to most people.

It's amazing how many musicians today don't know anything about these instruments... including, sadly, the Hammond organ. I've occasionally discussed the Wurlitzer, Rhodes and Hammond with our worship band leader, and then he makes some silly comment in reply. Granted, he's in his early 30's and wouldn't have been around back in the day, but I'd think he'd have a little bit of interest.

 

Oh well...

 

:rolleyes:

 

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
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I don't why the EP sounds have held up so well either. I played the stuff because I had to I would convert 85% of it to AP but.... I usually try to stay somewhat true to the cover.

 

Personally I always liked Piano over fuzzy xylophone.

"It doesn't have to be difficult to be cool" - Mitch Towne

 

"A great musician can bring tears to your eyes!!!

So can a auto Mechanic." - Stokes Hunt

 

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Most non-musicians born after 1980 don't know what a tine or reed EP is

I'm not sure many non-musicians born before 1980 would know, either.

What about non-musicians born in 1980?

Hey! Yeah! What about those guys??!! :poke:

 

:D

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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In 1970 or thereabouts, my high school's music department bought a boatload of Wurlitzer electric pianos. It was like heaven.

 

Back then, you could get a pass to go to the Wurli-class (if it wasn't being used) during study hall. I spent hours there.

 

We had it made and we didn't even know it.

Steve Coscia

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I think any electromechanical or acoustic instrument is going to hold up over time, because it's a dynamic, playable, expressive instrument with a unique sound.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

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I think any electromechanical or acoustic instrument is going to hold up over time, because it's a dynamic, playable, expressive instrument with a unique sound.

And I think part of that uniqueness is in the impurities. One of the reasons we love the Rhodes, Wurli and tonewheel Hammond/Leslie combos is because of inherent distortion and artifacts (such as key click, leakage, hum, release noises, overloaded tines and reeds etc.). Why we find that inspiring, I have no idea, other than it seems to allow our own exuberance a way to express itself that can't be achieved (easily) in a digital representation.

 

In the '80s and '90s, when instrument manufacturers had access to ICs and digital techniques, they sterilized the sound, and are now fighting to reinstall the "dirt." I wonder whether anyone will, once again, design a "real" keyboard, or whether we're doomed to a permanently cloned future.

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Laurens Hammond probably didn't expect the cult following that tone wheel organs have enjoyed either.

 

Although Laurens Hammond was not a musician, he was a musical snob who had no appreciation for jazz, blues, rock, or any popular music. Hammond never acknowledged people like Jimmy Smith who made his organ popular.

 

Alan Pearlman of ARP was also a bit of a snob but at least he embraced popular musicians using his instruments.

 

I think Harold Rhodes is smiling in his grave knowing that his instruments are still desired today.

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I think Harold Rhodes is smiling in his grave knowing that his instruments are still desired today.
Ewww!!!

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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Theres just something that's hard to explain about sitting at a console Hammond, or sitting at a Rhodes, but really, just not practical to gig with, especially when Im still getting paid the same for a gig now as I was in 1988. I aint lugging a B3 for peanuts . Although last summer, checking out several street fests in Chicago, a lot of players were in fact lugging their Rhodes and wurlis to the stage, impressed me a lot when typically, all you see are the red machines everyone uses....

"Ive been playing Hammond since long before anybody paid me to play one, I didn't do it to be cool, I didnt do it to make a statement......I just liked it "

 

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It was not until I head this song as a 14 year old that I realized how powerful the Wurlie sound was.

 

[video:youtube]

Great clip!

 

Ian Mac! You gotta love him!

'55 and '59 B3's, Leslies 147, 122, 21H, Motif XS7, Mellotrons M300 and M400, Wurlitzer 200, Gibson G101, Vox Continental, Mojo
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It was not until I head this song as a 14 year old that I realized how powerful the Wurlie sound was.

 

[video:youtube]

Great clip!

 

Ian Mac! You gotta love him!

 

Hammonddave, you need to let your hair grow out like Rod's in this video. You will drive the girls crazy if you do! :crazy:

 

And by the way, the Wurlitzer is one of the sounds of the EP that I don't believe will ever be replaced. Still can't figure why the RMI hasn't been revisited by some of the clone keys unless it has and I'm not aware of it.

John Cassetty

 

"there is no dark side of the moon, really. As a matter of fact it's all dark"

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It was not until I head this song as a 14 year old that I realized how powerful the Wurlie sound was.

 

[video:youtube]

Great clip!

 

Ian Mac! You gotta love him!

 

Hammonddave, you need to let your hair grow out like Rod's in this video. You will drive the girls crazy if you do! :crazy:

 

 

I would... If I had hair...

'55 and '59 B3's, Leslies 147, 122, 21H, Motif XS7, Mellotrons M300 and M400, Wurlitzer 200, Gibson G101, Vox Continental, Mojo
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Rhodes, Wurlitzer, and Hammond all started out as poor imitations of something else (piano, pipe organ). I even remember not liking Rhodes the first time I tried one, because it wasn't a piano. Then I, like countless keyboard players before me, learned to appreciate it for what it was rather than dislike it for what it wasn't.

 

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Still can't figure why the RMI hasn't been revisited by some of the clone keys unless it has and I'm not aware of it.

It's on the SV-1, although I can't remember which preset or RMI setting (I reworked most of my presets).

 

Lots of different RMI presets on Kurzweils as well.

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