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Any problems with playing a Yamaha P90 in the rain?


alby

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Hi guys,

 

I have had to gig a couple times with my Yamaha P90 in a very light drizzle. Last night was a recent example.

 

Are there any long term ramifications for doing this? The P90 seems to have survived so far.

 

It is not something that I intend doing regularly, but unavoidable at times. Like when it starts raining outdoors in the middle of a song.

 

The funniest incident was when we were playing "September in the rain", with bubble jet printed lead sheets when it started raining. The notes were literally running off the paper. The band came to a grinding halt in the middle of the song.

 

regards

Alby

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:eek:

 

 

Ummmm.... okay, give me a second...

 

 

:eek:

 

 

You can't actually be serious, can you? :freak:

 

I mean, aside from the warning in the P-90 manual on page 3:

 

Water warning

 

Do not expose the instrument to rain, use it near water or in damp or wet conditions, or place containers on it containing liquids which might spill into any openings.

Never insert or remove an electric plug with wet hands.

...isn't there some little voice in the back of your head telling you that electricity and water don't mix? :confused:

 

The risk of electrocution and catastrophic damage to components aside, yes, there are definitely negative long-term ramifications from allowing moisture (even 'drizzle' quantities) to penetrate the enclosure of any electronic equipment.

 

I need a drink. :freak:

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I wouldn't hesitate to stop in the middle of a song and cover up my stuff if it started to rain. Actually, I wouldn't play outside at all if there wasn't some kind of covering for the stage. Consider yourself lucky that your keyboard has made it through okay, but I would recommend not letting it happen again. As Sven said, it may seem fine, but there could be long term damage that could start showing up somewhere down the line.
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My bands would shut down at the first drop of precipitation.

 

Even folks scheduled for electrocution want to STAY...here. ;)

 

Under no circumstances should a musician continue playing in the rain. Even if the gig paid enough to replace the board, it cannot pay enough to bring you back alive.

 

Already covered in an old thread but extreme heat is the worse too. Be smart with your gear and live on to play another day. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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I don't know about a light rain

 

Just don't let anyone puke champagne on your P90

 

This is not covered by a warranty

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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as far as I remember yamahas are waterproof up to 1 meter.

A friend once was playing gig in a pool, with no problems. lead sheet had to be laminated though.

 

I remember after that one of the notes, I guess C5

had bubbling sound...

♫♫♫ motif XS6, RD700GX
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Others mentioned stuff about electrocution and protecting your gear, so I'll mention something else: you (or someone else) could slip and fall--even worse onto your gear.

 

I never play gigs outdoors where my gear is completely exposed to the elements. I want a covering (in case of precipitation), a scaffolding (in case of flooding or other things that could ooze up from the ground), some kind of protection from the wind (in case it gusts), and protection from over-eager fans (to prevent the aforementioned puking). ;)

 

With that said, I do like gigging outdoors.

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Originally posted by delirium:

as far as I remember yamahas are waterproof up to 1 meter.

A friend once was playing gog in a pool, with no problems. lead sheet had to be laminated though.

 

I remember after that one of the notes, I guess C5

had bubbling sound...

my band had a gig in a pool. I discovered a B3 floats better than a Fender Rhodes

 

I think the wood case helped...

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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Originally posted by delirium:

as far as I remember yamahas are waterproof up to 1 meter. A friend once was playing gig in a pool, with no problems. lead sheet had to be laminated though.

 

I remember after that one of the notes, I guess C5

had bubbling sound...

Ha-ha! :D Funny...

 

But seriously though, I have stashed in one of my cases a sheet of thin plastic, the kind they put around your dry cleaning, in fact I think that's where I got it from. If it's just very light drizzle, for a couple of minutes, and no one seems to have stopped the show yet, I'll throw that over the keys, and keep playing - you can play through that stuff, no problem. Of course, if the rain starts to get stronger, I stop playing.

 

I also have stashed in my cases a sheet of plexiglass, for putting over sheet music on windy outdoor gigs (is there any other kind?)

 

Ever try playing an outdoor gig in really cold weather? Try playing with gloves on, that can be fun, especially if they're really thick ones, so that your fingers end up wider than the keys - each note you play brings one or two others with it - wacky!

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Originally posted by Floyd Tatum:

 

Ever try playing an outdoor gig in really cold weather? Try playing with gloves on, that can be fun, especially if they're really thick ones, so that your fingers end up wider than the keys - each note you play brings one or two others with it - wacky!

I have that problem without the gloves :(
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Originally posted by Floyd Tatum:

Ever try playing an outdoor gig in really cold weather? Try playing with gloves on, that can be fun, especially if they're really thick ones, so that your fingers end up wider than the keys - each note you play brings one or two others with it - wacky! [/QB]

well, we have already color lighted keys,

why don't just build heated keys... :idea:

not that hard to do I guess, we have enough power

in our amps to heat it up a whole house.

 

BTW, we'd have additional nice stage effect like coming steam from the keybed...

 

Oh, they have heated keyboard already for PC:

warm keyboard

♫♫♫ motif XS6, RD700GX
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Originally posted by delirium:

Originally posted by Floyd Tatum:

Ever try playing an outdoor gig in really cold weather? Try playing with gloves on, that can be fun, especially if they're really thick ones, so that your fingers end up wider than the keys - each note you play brings one or two others with it - wacky!

well, we have already color lighted keys,

why don't just build heated keys... :idea:

not that hard to do I guess, we have enough power

in our amps to heat it up a whole house.

 

BTW, we'd have additional nice stage effect like coming steam from the keybed...

 

Oh, they have heated keyboard already for PC:

warm keyboard [/QB]

OTOH, then the various manufacturers providing that kind of solution will have to go to war over who provides "The Best " thermostat isolation circuitry . . .
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Originally posted by ewall08530:

For those outdoor cold gigs, I have a very slim pair of gloves that I have cut about an inch of the tip off each finger and thumb. It really helps!

Yep... I picked up a pair of Isotoner gloves and did the exact same thing. When you do outdoor gigs for New Year's Eve, you tend to learn these lessons the hard way. :thu:
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To the original poster - in case you still didn't get it from the others:

 

Don't play under direct rain, no matter how light. Don't play on a wet stage. NEVER.

This is for your health first, and for your gear's health second. The fact that you got away until now means nothing.

 

Don't say you weren't advised. ;)

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When I was in the military they had different degrees of ... wetness. Was it a dry rain? :D

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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