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Acoustic Pianos


piano39

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I have a very nice studio with a Motif XF + 4 lesser electronic keyboards, and a fully equipped DAW studio, great monitors, etc.

 

Why do I get more enjoyment out of playing my 1923 Upright piano?

My technician tells me that I need to spend $3000 to fix this piano correctly, but advises against it.

 

The though occurs to me that I am a serious piano player, but NEVER play a decent acoustic piano. About 20 years ago, local clubs would have crappy pianos in their bars, but even those are gone now.

 

I went to an acoustic piano dealer last week that sells high end Yamaha and Steinways. After I noodled around on a variety of uprights he had me play a Yamaha CFIII. It was hands down the best sounding piano I ever played. I could only play it for about a minute. I did not want to spend too much time on it because it was unattainable.

 

One reason that I don't own a decent piano is because I do not feel like spending >$8K, plus about $500/ year in maintenance.

 

By the way, I played the new Yamaha Hybrid digital pianos. I didn't like the sound of the bottom line one (NU1), but loved the next one up (N1). About $7K or so.

Yamaha Motif XF6, Yamaha AN200, Alesis Micron, Sonar X3, Arturia Microbrute, Behringer Model D, Yamaha UX-3 Acoustic Piano, assorted homemade synth modules
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I love a real acoustic piano: uprights, grands, etc.

 

I have been surprised at how much I like the Yamaha N series. Yeah, I sprang for the N2, but I think I got more grand piano for my money than all the other alternatives I examined. And I never, ever have to tune it.

 

The other thing you might investigate is a good used Yamaha U1 upright. I've played them for years, and there seems to be no shortage of used ones for sale at quite reasonable prices on Craigslist -- $3K+ for a reasonable instrument.

Life is too short to be playing bad music.

 

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The other thing you might investigate is a good used Yamaha U1 upright. I've played them for years, and there seems to be no shortage of used ones for sale at quite reasonable prices on Craigslist -- $3K+ for a reasonable instrument.

 

+1...I wouldn't give up my U1 for anything. (unless someone gives me a CFIII and a house that can accommodate it.)

Nord Stage 3 88, Korg Kronos 2 61, Moog Sub 37, Yamaha U1 Upright, Casio CT-S1, Spacestation V.3, QSC K10.2

www.stickmanor.com

There's a thin white line between fear and fury - Stickman

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I have an old small grand that needs just about everything done to it to get it in proper condition. It was good enough for me a few years ago when I got it, but I've outgrown it. Unfortunately, it's not worth the investment for me to have that work done. I've done a lot of work on it myself and enjoy doing that very much, but what remains is a larger project than I can do for various reasons. I will probably give it to someone who will only play it a little, and it will look nice in their living room.

 

Spending $3000 on your upright is questionable. If you think you're going to keep it and get that value out of it, it's worth doing. But, you could put that same $3000 towards a "new" one that will go much further for you and possibly have some resale value for your down the road. I put "new" in quotes because that could mean a good deal on a good used piano, where your money can go much further.

 

I've been piano shopping the past few months, and it's both a struggle and a blast. It's great trying out all these pianos, but it's a drag driving all over just to try out a piano in someone's home. Then, you find it's out of tune or has other issues. I don't know, I think if you're selling a piano for thousands of dollars, you can spend around $100 to have the dumb thing tuned. I've also missed out on some good pianos for different reasons.

 

There's nothing like playing a real acoustic piano.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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I play every Thursday afternoon at the LA Music Academy in Pasadena. I've brought both my CP5 & Nord Piano in there on occasions when they were servicing the 6' Young Chang. The digital pianos might be clearer but they are way more thin and don't sustain like the real thing. The "old" Chang as we call it is pretty beat but still is way better then any dp. You just play differently on an acoustic vs a digital. There's no comparison. Everything feels more "right" and natural on acoustic..

 

Here's a not so good audio quality example of it. The singer and guitarist are the students. The 3 horns, bass and myself are there to play with the students. There's usually a student drummer but in this case we were reading a new chart so Tony Inzalaco, the teacher, played on it.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibt8A-ALU94

 

But definitely great deals to be had on the LA CL on grands or uprights. The main thing is to have "a piano" ...any piano.

 

I started with this in '79 when I first moved to LA. I practiced 4 hours a day, 6 days a week for almost 6 years on it.

http://www.kohlerandcampbell.com/km247.html

 

Was finally working enough around town to be able to get a C7E in '85. They were affordable then. I paid under 14K brand new. I kept trading up every 10 years or so. Traded the C7 on an S6 in'97 and was very lucky to find a once in a lifetime deal on the Steinway in '06.

 

The outrageous steep pricing of a good acoustic aside, the main problem with a lot of people I know are space and noise restrictions of condos and apartments. The Avant Grands are an excellent alternative but way overpriced imo.

https://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

 

NY Steinway D

Yamaha AvantGrand N3X, P-515

 

 

 

 

 

 

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There's nothing like playing a real acoustic piano.

THIS

 

Sometimes I think about selling all my gear just so I would focus on acoustic piano. (That thought quickly fades as I am a gearslut.) I am fortunate enough to have 2 pianos, a baby grand and an upright. When I get old I want to look like your avatar, Joe. I mean Bones. :laugh:

:nopity:
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I have the privilege of playing an outstanding piano every day, a fifteen year old Schimmel 6-10 LE. The Yamaha P105 is a little more practical for gigging, however.

 

 

aka âmisterdregsâ

 

Nord Electro 5D 73

Yamaha P105

Kurzweil PC3LE7

Motion Sound KP200S

Schimmel 6-10LE

QSC CP-12

Westone AM Pro 30 IEMs

Rolls PM55P

 

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Researching the Yamaha U1, as a couple of you posted about.

Found a few within 100 miles, ranging in price from $2K to $4K.

 

Guess I just got a case of GAS.

Yamaha Motif XF6, Yamaha AN200, Alesis Micron, Sonar X3, Arturia Microbrute, Behringer Model D, Yamaha UX-3 Acoustic Piano, assorted homemade synth modules
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I've found that the used U1s hold their value very well and there's always a good resale market as they're sort of a de-facto standard that everyone is familiar with, well made, etc..

 

Not to mention, they're very nice as far as uprights go - great action, tone, they hold a tuning pretty well, etc.. Don't buy new, though, the depreciation is brutal for the first 3-5 years.

 

Shop well, my friend!

Life is too short to be playing bad music.

 

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When I get old I want to look like your avatar, Joe. I mean Bones. :laugh:
:D Yeah, I would like to be playing piano for the rest of my life, and then some! Maybe I should buy this place and I can join the party after I die.

 

http://www.chron.com/homes/article/Haunted-Texas-landmark-Weinert-House-for-sale-in-4845648.php

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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$500/ year in maintenance.

 

I feel you on all this. Just want to point out that this figure doesn't make sense unless you're getting instrument tuned 5 times a year.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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Within about the next 15 - 20 years , I see most of the acoustics becoming obsolete , with the dramatic advancements being made with electronic technology.

 

Brett

 

Never. At least not in my lifetime. Impossible to reproduce 100% of the nuance and feeling of 9' of solid spruce resonating real air in a room.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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Within about the next 15 - 20 years , I see most of the acoustics becoming obsolete , with the dramatic advancements being made with electronic technology.

 

Brett

 

there will always be a demand for acoustic instruments regardless of improvements in technology

:nopity:
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Here's my theory. I've been discussing with some people offline about this, and the difference between where we are with organ clones vs. DPs.

 

Organs always ran through speakers (electric organs, anyway). All the sound came from that. Leslie speakers dispersed the sound a bit more, but not like a piano. Acoustic pianos hit us in many, many ways. There are vibrations coming from all different directions, including through the keys, the floor, and the whole body of the instrument. You feel it when you play. Can these things be simulated? Sure. But how many speakers and amplifier circuits would it take to do that? How much do you have to replicate a real piano action to get that exact feel? By the time you've done that, you might as well have the real thing.

 

DPs and software pianos are great, don't get me wrong. But they won't completely replace physical pianos for those who care, not with just a couple of stereo speakers or even something like 5.1.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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My technician tells me that I need to spend $3000 to fix this piano correctly, but advises against it.

 

Where are you located? What does he/she say needs to be done? I'm going to assume that it needs new hammers, dampers, key bushings, bridle straps, and various other felt parts that have worn through out the years. That would be a $1000 - $1500 job for me to do depending on what exactly it needs. If it needs to be restrung and re-pinned, then you're getting into the $3000 territory. I'm just curious.

 

What make of upright is it?

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My post wasn't comprehended properly - MOST acoustics (their production slashed to the bone) will be obsolete.

Only a small handful of the best master makers of acoustics will be left.

Just around the corner , I see real grand action key beds , triggering totally realistic sounding digital/electronic sound generators. Without the dogma of WEIGHT ,high price , and TUNING and miking hassles.

Elton is doing it a bit now , triggering his pet Roland MKS20 module off his acoustic grand. Except the sounds will sound like the real thing , not a Roland MKS20 :).

 

Brett

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Elton is doing it a bit now , triggering his pet Roland MKS20 module off his acoustic grand.

Brett

 

I loved gigging my old Roland RD 300s (late 80s early 90s).

Self praise is no recommendation but I can really play now. Thought I was ok twenty years ago - and as good as I was going to get - but something happened in my 40s and a combination of practising and .. whatever, too much info

 

I get gigs where I have to supply a keyboard and ones where they have a piano. One gig (choir accompaniment in my local theatre) - they have a properly maintained Steinway upright. I take a semi weighted 76 note keyboard to the ones where I have to supply a keyboard.

 

I still miss my 88 note RD300s. Very heavy but I miss the way it cut through.

 

You go Elton. Do your crazy flamboyant too many feathers and big glasses thing on something driving an MKS20.

 

If I'd your money, I suspect I might too - for pop/rock stuff.

 

btw hello bobadeath and bob musk. Been on here a while and don't remember seeing either of you before - but your number of posts indicates you're regulars. Hello from Perth.

I'm the piano player "off of" Borrowed Books.
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btw hello bobadeath and bob musk. Been on here a while and don't remember seeing either of you before - but your number of posts indicates you're regulars. Hello from Perth.

 

Dude. It's their Halloween personas. You'll laugh when you figure out who they are :)

David

Gig Rig:Roland Fantom-08| Arturia Keylab 61MK2 | MacBook Pro 14" M1| Mainstage

 

 

 

 

 

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btw hello bobadeath and bob musk. Been on here a while and don't remember seeing either of you before - but your number of posts indicates you're regulars. Hello from Perth.

 

Dude. It's their Halloween personas. You'll laugh when you figure out who they are :)

BWAH HA HAAAA!!

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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My post wasn't comprehended properly - MOST acoustics (their production slashed to the bone) will be obsolete.

 

Most acoustics are already obsolete. There were thousands of piano makers in America at the turn of the 20th century. Have a quick thumb through the Pierce Piano Atlas as an example. Now you can count the American manufacturers that actually still make them in America on one hand.

 

But there will always be a market for a real acoustic piano. Nothing beats sitting down at a real 9' concert grand. Even a well-made console, like the Yamaha U series, are inspiring to play vs their digital counterparts.

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