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For Brad Mehldau and/or Jon Brion fans


Dana.

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Defintely should be an interesting collaboration. I wonder if Kanye West will make a guest appearance on the record (Brion worked with him too). :laugh::cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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I heard about this a while back. Looking forward to it. Largo was a killer album, and I used to play some of those tunes pretty frequently on gigs when my trio was active. Particularly "When It Rains" and "Dusty McNugget." We also did the drum and bass version of "Wave" once or twice. Matt Chamberlain kills it on that track. One of my favorite drummers.
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  • 3 weeks later...
I was jonesing for this before and the video just made it much worse. I'm not a fan of most attempts at "orchestral jazz" but this sounds so cool. Mehldau seems to be coming into his own as a composer. He has that ability to make things that are interesting and complex but that sound inviting and sweet even on the first listening.

Nord Stage 3 88, Korg Kronos 2 61, Moog Sub 37, Yamaha U1 Upright, Casio CT-S500, Spacestation V.3, QSC K10.2

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There's a thin white line between fear and fury - Stickman

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I love Mehldau. I've seen him several times, and he strikes me as a particularly deep improviser--unpredictable, with a "long throw" on his ideas--truly spontaneous composition.

 

And I like about half of what Jon Brion does. "Largo," oddly wasn't a favorite of mine. "Places" was.

Check out the Sweet Clementines CD at bandcamp
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I can't stop thinking about this after watching the video earlier today. Jon Brion's comment that, "There aren't any good [jazz musicians] anymore" is ringing through my mind. I know what he means, he's talking about originality and innovation and it's given me real food for thought today.

 

This should be a cool album, but we'll have to wait and see. It may be brilliant and not to my taste. With all those great players, it's worth a peep.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

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I wasn't thrilled about that comment either. I get tired of those kinds of generalizations when they slam a whole bunch of people. Then again, I never heard of Jon Brion before today

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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Jon Brion wasn't involved in Places. To date, Largo is the only album that Brion and Mehldau have collaborated on.

 

I know. The mis-arrangement of my thoughts made it seem as though I thought Brion produced Places.

 

I was really taken by Brion's production when I first encountered it (probably the first two Aimee Mann records.) As a virtual disciple of the Rain Dogs-and-beyond era of Tom Waits, I liked the way Brion incorporated the "twisted cabaret" vibe into more modern, guitar-driven pop. Froom and Blake from that period, too. Brion's also a hell of a multi-intrumentalist, that's for sure. I think he's gotten a little mannered, providing "that Jon Brion thing," but I suppose that's always the risk when you have a strong vision. The Brion album I probably like best--sonically if not in terms of songs--is the second Fiona Apple album. Talk about a showcase for Matt Chamberlain!

Check out the Sweet Clementines CD at bandcamp
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I can't stop thinking about this after watching the video earlier today. Jon Brion's comment that, "There aren't any good [jazz musicians] anymore" is ringing through my mind. I know what he means, he's talking about originality and innovation and it's given me real food for thought today.

Don't read too much into that comment. Over time, musos tend to think that way.

 

I listen for the next Miles, Herbie, Chick, Harris, Evans, Weather Report, etc. Then, I have to step back and think about how those cats kept it moving.

 

While musos and the public may not have appreciated everything they put out, it was important to them as musos to continue exploring music.

 

I still listen for unique voices in musicianship and creative ideas but I'm accepting that music continues moving forward whether it is retro trends and/or a combination of influences.

 

There may not be another school of [insert virtuoso muso here] and/or coming up with their own -isms to be copped by a future generation of musos.

 

It doesn't prevent musos from making great music. Mehldau is on the right path by bringing "different" folks into his project(s). :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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I can't stop thinking about this after watching the video earlier today. Jon Brion's comment that, "There aren't any good [jazz musicians] anymore" is ringing through my mind. I know what he means, he's talking about originality and innovation and it's given me real food for thought today.

Don't read too much into that comment. Over time, musos tend to think that way.

 

I listen for the next Miles, Herbie, Chick, Harris, Evans, Weather Report, etc. Then, I have to step back and think about how those cats kept it moving.

 

While musos and the public may not have appreciated everything they put out, it was important to them as musos to continue exploring music.

 

I still listen for unique voices in musicianship and creative ideas but I'm accepting that music continues moving forward whether it is retro trends and/or a combination of influences.

 

There may not be another school of [insert virtuoso muso here] and/or coming up with their own -isms to be copped by a future generation of musos.

 

It doesn't prevent musos from making great music. Mehldau is on the right path by bringing "different" folks into his project(s). :cool:

 

Hey, I think there's some validity in the comment. Obviously Brion himself doesn't entirely feel that way, as he does dig Meldau and I'm sure he dug the other guys Meldau used on that record. But when you think about so many young jazz musicians and their lack of originality, I can see why he would be fed up.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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Regarding Brion's comment on jazz musicians: To me, it just sounded like a toss off comment that was meant as a compliment to Mehldau. I'm guessing that if Brion was pressed, he would say the comment was an exaggeration. His sentiment is probably more along the lines you could make for any type of music, i.e. that there are a lot of hacks, imitators, and even respectful, proficient practitioners...but very few with a new voice.

 

But far be it for me to speak for him :-)

Nord Stage 3 88, Korg Kronos 2 61, Moog Sub 37, Yamaha U1 Upright, Casio CT-S500, Spacestation V.3, QSC K10.2

www.stickmanor.com

There's a thin white line between fear and fury - Stickman

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Hey, I think there's some validity in the comment...But when you think about so many young jazz musicians and their lack of originality, I can see why he would be fed up.

His sentiment is probably more along the lines you could make for any type of music, i.e. that there are a lot of hacks, imitators, and even respectful, proficient practitioners...but very few with a new voice.

Like yourselves, I would imagine Brion is thinking along those lines.

 

However, I do wonder with so many influences from recorded music to competing forms of entertainment whether the environment exists to appreciate a new or unique voice.

 

IMO, regardless of genre/style and talent, a lot of music sounds derivative. That isn't a knock because some of it is still very good. I'm just not so sure musicians can escape it. :cool:

 

 

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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I can't say I disagree with Brion. There are a lot of really talented young guys in jazz for sure, but not many that have the kind of unique voice on their instrument that makes guys like Miles, Trane, Monk, Ellington, Powell, Rollins, Jarrett, Evans, Corea, and Hancock stand the test of time. You know, the kind of playing that really moves you. That indescribable "it." Mehldau has it. Metheny has it. Michael Brecker had it. In my opinion, Chris Potter and Joshua Redman have it. That's about it as far as I'm concerned. There are lots of other guys who can indeed play their asses off, but are missing a sense of innovation (which is what jazz is all about) and that "it" factor." I think that's what Brion meant.

 

Of course it also could have been something he just said without thinking in order to pay Mehldau a compliment, and it just sorta came out the wrong way. Lord knows I've have plenty of times where my mouth was ahead of my brain as well..

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I'm thinking the way you are Bridog6996. Guys can play their asses off, but they aren't all unique the way the guys were. That's the way it is. Some have their own voice, but many don't compared to back in the day when many more did. I think that's Brion's point, and I think it's the way many others think as well.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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I can't say I disagree with Brion. There are a lot of really talented young guys in jazz for sure, but not many that have the kind of unique voice on their instrument that makes guys like Miles, Trane, Monk, Ellington, Powell, Rollins, Jarrett, Evans, Corea, and Hancock stand the test of time. You know, the kind of playing that really moves you. That indescribable "it." Mehldau has it. Metheny has it. Michael Brecker had it. In my opinion, Chris Potter and Joshua Redman have it. That's about it as far as I'm concerned. There are lots of other guys who can indeed play their asses off, but are missing a sense of innovation (which is what jazz is all about) and that "it" factor." I think that's what Brion meant.

 

Of course it also could have been something he just said without thinking in order to pay Mehldau a compliment, and it just sorta came out the wrong way. Lord knows I've have plenty of times where my mouth was ahead of my brain as well..

I'm thinking the way you are Bridog6996. Guys can play their asses off, but they aren't all unique the way the guys were. That's the way it is. Some have their own voice, but many don't compared to back in the day when many more did. I think that's Brion's point, and I think it's the way many others think as well.

 

+100

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Brion doesn't listen to enough jazz. . .Dave Douglas, Avishai Cohen, Maria Schneider (and more) . . .he'd like them if he listened to them.

 

I'd guess Dave Douglas, & Zorn, et. al, is exactly the kind of jazz Brion listens to--not all Marsalis/Lincoln Center-approved canonical jazz. Which begs the question: is even honking, downtown jazz canonical and institutionalized now? (Don't mean to dismiss the brilliant Dave Douglas as "honking, downtown." Just terms of conveninece...)

Check out the Sweet Clementines CD at bandcamp
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I'd guess Dave Douglas, & Zorn, et. al, is exactly the kind of jazz Brion listens to--not all Marsalis/Lincoln Center-approved canonical jazz.

I don't think he listens to any of those people. Check out some of his set lists from Largo and you'll see that he's all about Fats Waller and Duke Ellington.

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