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Giant Steps


linwood

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nice, I assume we all have such drawing in head when we hear music :cool:

 

I actually don't, instead I visualize the key itself on the keyboard. I like this method and use something very similar when learning to play a new song. It helps me to see and hear it at the same time. The more modalities I use generally, the better it is for me.

Begin the day with a friendly voice A companion, unobtrusive

- Rush

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I actually don't, instead I visualize the key itself on the keyboard. I like this method and use something very similar when learning to play a new song. It helps me to see and hear it at the same time. The more modalities I use generally, the better it is for me.

 

I was just teasing, when I hear music I see more like a mix of colors and emotions. Thanks God I don't see any notes on paper :grin:

♫♫♫ motif XS6, RD700GX
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Tommy's probably grateful for that. You can tell he's overwhelmed. I've heard him talk about it. When Coltrane gave him the changes, he assumed it was a ballad. Then when it got counted off, he was completely unprepared for it. They didn't use that first take on the album, but even still, it takes more than a few takes' worth of practice to be able to play over those changes. Finally, he decided to keep his solo minimal, which would provide some contrast to Coltrane's solo anyway. He later re-recorded the song under his own name some years later and did a great version. Dignity regained. :thu:
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Yes,Yes......

 

I have that record..."In memory of JC...Giant Steps"..It's on the very hip Enja label....I've never seen it on CD.

W/George Mraz and Al Foster....they play all 6 tunes from the Giant Steps record....just beautiful!

 

I'll have to say my favorite Tommy recording is "Jazz Poet" on the Timeless label (1989) W/ again G. Mraz and Kenny Washington. Raincheck, Caravan, I'm old fashioned.......classic stuff.

 

Tommy along with Hank Jones embody the highest level of that style jazz piano playing.

 

I've listened to these guys for many years....they have had a major impact on my development as a player.

 

Best

Dave Ferris

https://soundcloud.com/dave-ferris

 

NY Steinway D

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Very cool. I thought this was a post from some time ago with the recording played along with some abstract multi-colored architectural animation. Here it is (gotta love the Spotlight feature on Mac OS X- I'd never have found it):

 

http://michalevy.com/gs_donate.html

aka âmisterdregsâ

 

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I have that record..."In memory of JC...Giant Steps"..It's on the very hip Enja label....I've never seen it on CD.

W/George Mraz and Al Foster....they play all 6 tunes from the Giant Steps record....just beautiful!

 

I have that album too. Actually, I transcribed Tommy's "Giant Steps" solo from it! He's able to give a strong melodic sense to his lines, even thru the intricate changes.

Flanagan is a monster swing pianist, probably the best accompanist a soloist can have - as Ella Fitzgerald knew very well. :)

 

I have a fond memory from a summer jazz festival of many years ago: After an outdoor concert of the Hancock/Metheny/Holland/DeJohnette quartet, I and my friends walked out rather overwhelmed by the 'always full' attitude of that group... only to discover that on a secondary stage, Tommy Flanagan was about to start a trio set. George Mraz was at the bass, and I couldn't identify the drummer - but I remember very vividly the free music lesson that I had that night. They played standards, mostly medium-tempo (Tommy was quite old already), with such good taste and 'logical' phrasing, one couldn't do anything but listen and be grateful. I'm all for modern jazz, you know - but when you hear a master at work, you just shut up and learn. :grin:

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I'm all for modern jazz, you know - but when you hear a master at work, you just shut up and learn. :grin:

 

He he. Well put, Marino.

aka âmisterdregsâ

 

Nord Electro 5D 73

Yamaha P105

Kurzweil PC3LE7

Motion Sound KP200S

Schimmel 6-10LE

QSC CP-12

Westone AM Pro 30 IEMs

Rolls PM55P

 

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Totally cool! Thanks for sharing it.

 

I like the way it shows Coltrane playing the rests. Nobody could play a rest quite like him. ;)

 

Seriously: we often think of rests as parts where we're not playing, and IMHO that's not the best way to think of it at all. If you pay attention to this video, I think you'll see what I mean.

 

What an amazing piece of music in any case, and a delight to watch as well. Even though I don't sight read, watching the score helped me understand what Coltrane was playing much better. (Going at 25% speed would help too!)

 

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learjeff,

 

Yes you have to be deeply connected to the beat regardless of weather your playing or not. The same intensity! I like the fact that you mentioned that espically on this tune!

 

lb

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Tommy Flannagan and I had (have) the same accountant. He gave me Tommy's last CD for free when he came over to do my taxes 3 or 4 years ago! Then he passed, shame as it is. I went through a phase with him about 15 years ago! You had to admire him really!

 

lb

SP6, CP-50, FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, XK-3, CX-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122
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Great video, yes, but to me what's interesting is the obvious inadequacy of the notes on the page to convey what Coltrane was playing. I've always known and certainly appreciated the ability of musicians to turn notes on a staff into a living piece of music, but, for some reason, watching the notes unfold in that video as you listen to Coltrane play them really hammered that point home for me.

 

Noah

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