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Dead Electro


Dave Pierce

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So, I'm rehearsing Friday night, and suddenly no sound is coming out of the Electro. "Gee," I think, "I wonder if all of the lights being out has anything to do with that?" :rolleyes: Turn the power switch to off, back on -- dead. Unplug it, plug it back in -- dead. Try a different power cord -- dead. Is the power circuit good? Sure, several other things are plugged into it with no problems. Different outlet maybe? Dead.

 

Sigh.

 

I finished the rehearsal on the bass player's 80s-vintage K-mart special Casio, which was . . . interesting. :P

 

Any helpful tips appreciated, but I'm really just bitching at this point. I know the obvious things to check, but I'm too heart-sick right now to bust out the tools and check it out. That thing is my baby, we've played a lot of gigs together. :cry:

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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Check to make sure it isn't something simple, like a fuse. Not sure if there's an external fuse on the Electro, or not, but it sounds like something simple, rather than a dead motherboard, or something.

 

Sorry to hear about your troubles, Dave... but on the bright side, at least it wasn't at a gig, just a rehearsal. :thu:

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Yeah, I'm also glad it wasn't a gig! It's actually a good argument for not finding the ever-elusive all-in-one 'board -- if you've got two on the gig, you can at least play something if one dies.

 

I thought of a fuse too -- before I crash out tonight I'll probably muster up the energy to open her up and check it out.

 

For a minute last night I thought it was a power surge or something -- a few minutes after this happened to me the drummers electronic drum "head" stopped working. But it turned out he had just kicked out the power cord while getting a beer. :D

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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wOw. I've been giggling (I mean gigging) with Electros for 4 years now and never once had a fuse problem. So I'm probably due for some bad luck soon.

 

Dave, what type of fuses were they? Any part # from RS? I could look at my Electro, but for the past 6 months, I've simply left my rig locked up in my Trooper in between gigs. Too much nonsense going on in the house to actually lug the live rig inside!

 

Regards,

Eric

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Originally posted by eric:

Dave, what type of fuses were they? Any part # from RS?

Sorry Eric, I don't recall.

 

I couldn't easily read the writing on the fuse, so I just brought it to Radio Shack and let the (much younger) clerk read it. He grabbed me the right ones.

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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Originally posted by Sven Golly:

Originally posted by konaboy:

you have to open the case to change the fuse?

Nope... there's a fuse cover on the back, right next to the AC cord, if memory serves.
Yes, that's right. I didn't notice that when it died, because the lighting was poor, but it's right on the back, super easy to swap it out (assuming you've got a replacement, that is).

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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Fuses generally blow due to increased current draw, (sometimes combined with sudden voltage surges or sags). Many times fuses blow due to lower than usual supply voltage. The supply voltage can drop due to the use of long extension cords causing an excessive current-resistance or "IR" drop.

 

Think of it like this: your keyboard generally wants to consume a constant wattage, say 500 watts. 500 watts equals 115 Volts (AC) times 4.35 amps. If the voltage drops to 95 volts (due to "IR" line loss), then the current needs to go up to 5.26 amps to maintain the 500 watts. If there is a 5 amp fuse in the circuit it will probably blow.

When most people go to work, they work. When musicians go to work, they play. Which do you prefer?
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Originally posted by Still Learning:

Fuses generally blow due to increased current draw, (sometimes combined with sudden voltage surges or sags). Many times fuses blow due to lower than usual supply voltage. The supply voltage can drop due to the use of long extension cords causing an excessive current-resistance or "IR" drop.

 

Think of it like this: your keyboard generally wants to consume a constant wattage, say 500 watts. 500 watts equals 115 Volts (AC) times 4.35 amps. If the voltage drops to 95 volts (due to "IR" line loss), then the current needs to go up to 5.26 amps to maintain the 500 watts. If there is a 5 amp fuse in the circuit it will probably blow.

That's right. Thanks. :thu:

 

Of course, if I ever buy a keyboard that consumes 500 watts, remind me to go on an Equal Payment Plan with the electric company. ;)

 

 

So Dave,

 

what do you think caused the fuse to blow?

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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Originally posted by Is There Gas in the Car?:

Of course, if I ever buy a keyboard that consumes 500 watts, remind me to go on an Equal Payment Plan with the electric company. ;)

Nah Gas, if you buy the keyboard, I think Dr. Emmett L. Brown can build you a converter for it. :D:cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Originally posted by ProfD:

Nah Gas, if you buy the keyboard, I think Dr. Emmett L. Brown can build you a converter for it. :D:cool:

/Dr.%20Emmett%20L.%20Brown.JPG

 

Gak :eek::D

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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Originally posted by Is There Gas in the Car?:

So Dave,

 

what do you think caused the fuse to blow?

Ummmm, sunspots?

 

I don't know is the only accurate answer. I mean, I could think of a bunch of things that could have been the problem. Temporary voltage drop? Transient short somewhere in the Electro? But "sunspots" is my default answer for things like this.

 

Or, 42.

 

:D

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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