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ELP


Paul Clancy

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There are transcriptions available for sale at Emo's website http://www.keithemerson.com/Store/KE-store.html

 

IMHO, the best albums are the early ones: Emerson Lake & Palmer (their first release in the US), Tarkus, Trilogy, Pictures at an Exhibition and Brain Salad Surgery.

 

If you aspire to play this stuff you will need to practice quite seriously for at least six hours a day (and probably more) in order to understand the material and be able to perform it cleanly.

 

How good are your chops for playing Bach, Chopin, Beethoven and Rachmaninoff?

 

- Barry

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Depends how much experience you already have with keyboards. ELP keyboard stuff is amongst the toughest to play in what I refer to as "band music", because on top of speed, one needs endurance, improvisation skills, etc.

 

I would recommend easier stuff like their "Works" or "Black Moon" albums to start practicing with.

 

I used to have my own tribute to ELP band some years ago. Let's just say it's not for everyone. :)

 

If you play classical piano, then it might be easier, as they often arranged classical pieces for "electric trio" (Bartók, Bach, Mussorgsky, Prokofiev, Copland, Ginastera, etc.).

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Originally posted by Cydonia:

I used to have my own tribute to ELP band some years ago.

Dear Cydonia,

 

Do you, perhaps, have recordings of this band?

 

I would love to hear this.

 

Thank you,

 

Tom :)

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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Originally posted by Cydonia:

Tom, check your mail. :)

So YOU ARE ACTUALLY KEITH EMERSON!!! :eek:

 

Very nice to meet you, Keith. :thu:

 

I hope you'll stick around The Keyboard Corner, as we'd love to hear more about your work.

 

Best regards,

 

Tom

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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I have working my way slowly thru ELP for about 1-2 years.

 

The midi files are on the Internet. There are ELP and Emerson Yahoo groups that make this easier

 

Then pick up Finale or similar software that You will be set for a long time translates midi files to tablature

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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Originally posted by Is There Gas in the Car?: Very nice to meet you, Keith. :thu:
*LOL* :D

 

Yep, you never know who might be hiding under the paperbag. Thanks Tom, for your great sense of humor. It's really appreciated. ;)

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Give Hoedown a whirl...It was one of the first ELP tunes I learned, and you can get many of the notes from the original (Copland) transcription. Practice your "D" major scales, as well....You can also get much of "Fanfare" from the original Copland transcription....This actually may be an easier ELP tune to start with....After you play the body of the song it turns into a jam in "E." My band frequently opens with Fanfare...it's a blast to play!

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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Ooooh I LOVE this thread! :love:

 

Personally, I started with Trilogy. That's because the original ELP song book was plentiful when I was 14. I then moved onto Benny the Bouncer, The Sheriff and Endless Enigma.

 

When I found the Tarkus songbook I was in heaven. Played it cover to cover. My favorite album. You can still pick these up for around $100 on eBay once in a great while. I have two copies.

 

The easiest and cheapest way to get your hands wet is to get a copy of Pictures at an Exhibition by Modest Mussorgsky. Any sheet music store should have a copy.

 

I play ELP strictly for pleasure. Not that I've never performed any ELP tunes, I have (I played Trilogy for my jury peice at Shenandoah Conservatory of Music in Virginia), but ELP is special. It's addictive to play these tunes. Great for practice and warm ups. Always get better and better too. Like there's no limit to how good you can play ELP if you keep playing ELP a lot.

 

http://members.aol.com/carlsresume/books.jpg

 

Visit these other threads for more info:

 

Karn Evil 9 makes an appearence on TV\'s Law and Order

Where to find ELP song books

 

Carl

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I believe the June 1992 issue of Keyboard had a transcription of the keyboard part of "Eruption" from Tarkus. If you already have that issue there's a great start as well. I used that when my band did "Eruption" as part of an ELP medley.

"The devil take the poets who dare to sing the pleasures of an artist's life." - Gottschalk

 

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I strongly recommend the live albums, not only as a glimpse of ELP's live chops, but also simply because you always find the 'best of' on a live album. Welcome Back My Friends sounds like it was recorded in a toilet, and Keith's piano mic feeds back pretty horribly a few times, but the performances are scorching, especially "Hoedown" and "Toccata." To see what it looks like, and to get a few more tracks, grab Live At The Royal Albert Hall on DVD. Get the audio album too, though, because there's a different performance of "Tarkus" on there which features THE ONCE AND FOR ALL TIME BADDEST HAMMOND ORGAN SOLO EVER RECORDED, AND FUCK YOU IF YOU DISAGREE. :eek:

 

Forgive me if I overstated that last bit.

"I had to have something, and it wasn't there. I couldn't go down the street and buy it, so I built it."

 

Les Paul

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Hi Folks,

I gotta chime in here. The first book I got was the Anthology in Carl's photo. It think it has a lot of stuff from Love Beach. But what I liked most was the Fugue from The Endless Enigma, a very nice piece (note: Endless Enigma is not in this book). One of my greates accomplishments was playing The Fugue without mistake - this I did ONCE (awful).

 

I have the Tarkus book. It's a pretty deep study, if you ask me. All fourths, seconds and fifths. I worked all through Tarkus for personal pleasure. It's a fantastic solo piano piece. The whole Tarkus album is in there, Jeremy Bender, Bitches Crystal (I heard a jazz/big band arrangement of this tune on the radio, can anybody identify the source?), Infinite Space (a great warm-up piece). It even includes Aquatarkus! Great material.

 

I also have the black song book with gold lettering (the one on the seat of the couch in Carl's photo). This is a must have also, Endless Enigma, Trilogy, Take a Pebble, Sheriff, Benny the Bouncer. It's great piano stuff.

 

The Triple Album is a "can't live without" must have. I agree with Mr. Jode about the Hammond solo on Stones of Years, probably my favorite of all time. As for DVD's, if you want a glimpse of ELP coincident with the triple live album, get "Beyond the Beginning". You will find the arrangements are the same as the album (gum chewing and all!). Even Emerson's Piano Improvisations use the same ideas and structures as the album (check out the beat-up Steinway). The Montreux and Royal Albert Hall DVD's are great too. Get the DVD's because after you hear the live album you're gonna wonder how on earth anybody could pull off the stuff Emerson pulls off, and there he is doing it. It's amazing stuff, the guy is extraordinarily talented, so too are L&P!

Regards,

Joe

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Originally posted by Jode:

Get the audio album too, though, because there's a different performance of "Tarkus" on there which features THE ONCE AND FOR ALL TIME BADDEST HAMMOND ORGAN SOLO EVER RECORDED, AND FUCK YOU IF YOU DISAGREE. :eek:

Damn, now I'm gonna have to buy it just so I can argue with you. ;):D

Botch

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In Beer there is Freedom

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I like to learn songs by using the VanBasco Karaoke Player... I'd watch the keyboard over and over and over until I memorized how to play it. I ALMOST have Eruption down. I think I'm pretty good for not having any training whatsoever.

 

www.vanbasco.com

He shall be Levon....
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I wore out three copies of the first ELP vinyl album learning "Take A Pebble" and "The Three Fates". :freak: I don't believe the transcriptions were ever published back then (oh my, what a long time ago that was!), so I just listened and practiced - literally, four to six hours a day - in order to learn those pieces. I still enjoy playing them today, as well as Tarkus and Hoedown, Trilogy, etc. But the only tune I can get my bandmates to agree to play is "From The Beginning"!

 

Despite my devotion to EMO, I suspect, Carl, that you would be a tough act to follow. ;)

 

Barry

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88 Keys,

Since you learned all those difficult tunes the hard way, you should not have a problem transcribing ELP's version of Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet, and I bet your band would play it, it's not too difficult to learn. The guys I play with love it. The guitarists like to solo over it and so do I. Of course, it is an instrumental. But it's cool!

Regards,

Joe

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Originally posted by Botch:

Originally posted by Jode:

Get the audio album too, though, because there's a different performance of "Tarkus" on there which features THE ONCE AND FOR ALL TIME BADDEST HAMMOND ORGAN SOLO EVER RECORDED, AND FUCK YOU IF YOU DISAGREE. :eek:

Damn, now I'm gonna have to buy it just so I can argue with you. ;):D
So, have you had time by now to hear the cut and discover that I'm right? ;)

"I had to have something, and it wasn't there. I couldn't go down the street and buy it, so I built it."

 

Les Paul

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Hopefully I'm not violating a forums rule here, but I have an ELP book listed on ebay right now, for those interested. Item #7411077761.

 

Includes:

1. Benny the Bouncer

2. The Endless Enigma - Part 1

3. The Endless Enigma - Part II

4. Jeremy Bender

5. The Sheriff

6. Take a Pebble

7. Trilogy

Les Mizzell

----------------------------------------------

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I am gigantic Emo fan and can't help but chime in. Since this is somewhat a discussion of Keith's technique, I would like to suggest that in particular Keith's left hand technique (and left - right hand independence) is one of the best in rock history. I think that sets him apart from the many other fantastic players. It's a lot more common to hear this from jazz guys, but Keith brought it squarely into the rock world and with some serious huevos. Examples: Tarkus, Trilogy, Karn Evil 9 ... and on. My favorite album: Pictures at an Exhibition. Now that's some serious live keyboard work!

 

Best regards,

Erik

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