Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Extended maintenance warranties ?


I-missRichardTee

Recommended Posts

Not OT because my vehicles carry my PA keys body ( the clown who pays for and plays these items ) to the gigs.

 

I have 2 weeks to decide on a new car maintenance warranty

Looking deeper into this I am learning ( my learning is limited and I welcome more info ) that eg

the manufacturers are saying you do not have to change your auto trans fluid till upwards of 100,000.00 miles

That sounds like a good thing, but is it?

The mechanic is no longer required to change the tran fluid!

I spoke to a service manager of a large dealership

he said he would change trans fluid 30,000 miles! that is, if you want car to last a long time ( 200,000 )

But factory recommendations contradict this

So a maintenance warranty does NOT mandate a tranny fluid change

similar for oil when they offer bloated ( based maybe on EPA pressures ) oil change intervals such as 7500 or 10,000 miles

it may be ok and it may not be for super long life.

 

Brake work is covered under the maintenance warranty ( at least $1800 for 75,000 mile warranty ) BUT even that warranty does not cover the brake FLUID!

 

A rattle in the dashboard is ONLY covered for within 12,000 miles EVEN with the pricey maintenance warranty!

 

other issues varying .. some only 12,000 miles

other 36,000, others 75,000 miles and 100,000 miles

The devil is in the details.

 

Can anyone give the nod for going for the maintenance warranty where they pay for brake pads, spark plug coils, plugs, timing belt or chains, etc?

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 26
  • Created
  • Last Reply

I think we would need more details to give a good recommendation, but most of what I've heard in the past is that these tend to not be good deals. Most of the time the dealer requires you to go to them for all of the maintenance and if you don't follow their schedule, or take it to somebody else, it voids the warranty. They are usually designed to drive business for their service department.

 

Do the math as to how much you would save by sticking the extra money into the bank and not spending it. Look at consumer reports and other sites for most common failures on that model and see if you can get some estimates for what that repair would cost. You'll have to spend money on things like brakes, oil, tires, and battery in either situation, so take all that out. My guess is that you'll be ahead by keeping your money and spending it as you need it.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's fluid in the transmission? :idk

 

Lol, yes and a filter, too. Usually doesn't have to be changed very often. But often when an automatic transmission starts to slip, it's the fluid/filter. Used to have to be changed much more often than in modern transmissions. You may not realize that there is also a transmission cooler in most cars. You'll see some transmission fluid lines going to a cooler that's either part of the radiator, or looks like a second smaller radiator.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also this I have so so credit, IF an issue came up, I could easily not have the money to repair or maintain it.

 

The other thing is all the many whys and wherefores, aka the details, of what is covered and what is not covered; and for what mileage interval ( 12,000, 36K, 75K and 100K )

eg:

On my last car, it was brakes time.. and dealer wanted around $1000! for all four ( with 59,000 - I still had a few miles on brakes left... not abused ) brakes!

That $1000 figure was bloated, but nevertheless I did not HAVE the 10K out of pocket while making the monthly payment of $400.

 

it is an inscrutable algebraic equation for me!

The details is my issue... I have not found all those prices for services, and the exceptions and mileage intervals all in one convenient place.

 

Anyone with anecdotal info, would be cool.

Thanks

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would just ask yourself if you believe there's any chance in hell the dealer has run the numbers on this and set it up so that they lose money (i.e. you come out ahead) on it?

 

I like the way you put that worldy wise, observation.

I guess it's more a matter of not trusting myself with my not so hot credit, and money.

Maybe I need to get a bit wiser with my money?

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's fluid in the transmission? :idk

 

Yes there is.. exactly like the fluid in your brain :wave:

 

Haven't changed that fluid either. :rimshot:

 

Ok seriously if you saw my long winded reply from yesterday regarding extended warranties you know I'm not a big fan. I rather have control over who and what is being done to my stuff. I haven't been burned yet but there's always that potential. I know people say it buys you peace of mind, but I don't worry about not have the warranty

after making the purchase.

 

Btw I didn't get an extended warranty on my brain. :snax:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Consumer Reports generalizes extended warranties (for cars, computers, phones, TV's, etc.) as a bad investment.

 

While many people that have purchased extended warranties will have a story of how wonderful it was to have it, there are many, many more that never cashed in and used them.

 

They're like life insurance and based upon the law of averages (how long stuff lasts, whether a human being or a hard drive) and are ABSOLUTELY geared to benefit the seller of the warranty. One of the things the car dealership loves to sell is extended warranties because they make so much money off of them.

 

All extended warranties are carefully written and crafted to EXCLUDE certain things, events, wear and tear, abuse, etc. so they often have an 'out' and don't have to pay.

 

My bet is your extended warranty will cost you well over $1K and wouldn't cover your brake replacement anyway (normal wear and tear).

 

Take the $$ you would have spent on the warranty and put it in the bank for the day you need it.

 

Most things we buy if they make it through the normal warranty period will generally avoid any 'lemon' issues.

 

The funny thing about extended car warranties is the car alreayd has 3 year/36K or 5 year/60K so when you buy an extended warranty you're really only getting a modest amount of additional time/miles over what is already included.

 

I've bought extended warranties on a couple computers because it was a modest amount of money. One of them (a desktop PC purchased from Best Buy) actually needed a new hard drive and motherboard. On that one, I cleaned up.

 

Like I said, everone that buys warranties has a winning story.

 

My .02 cents.

Kurzweil Forte, Yamaha Motif ES7, Muse Receptor 2 Pro Max, Neo Ventilator
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Consumer Reports generalizes extended warranties (for cars, computers, phones, TV's, etc.) as a bad investment.

 

While many people that have purchased extended warranties will have a story of how wonderful it was to have it, there are many, many more that never cashed in and used them.

 

They're like life insurance and based upon the law of averages (how long stuff lasts, whether a human being or a hard drive) and are ABSOLUTELY geared to benefit the seller of the warranty. One of the things the car dealership loves to sell is extended warranties because they make so much money off of them.

 

All extended warranties are carefully written and crafted to EXCLUDE certain things, events, wear and tear, abuse, etc. so they often have an 'out' and don't have to pay.

 

My bet is your extended warranty will cost you well over $1K and wouldn't cover your brake replacement anyway (normal wear and tear).

 

Take the $$ you would have spent on the warranty and put it in the bank for the day you need it.

 

Most things we buy if they make it through the normal warranty period will generally avoid any 'lemon' issues.

 

The funny thing about extended car warranties is the car alreayd has 3 year/36K or 5 year/60K so when you buy an extended warranty you're really only getting a modest amount of additional time/miles over what is already included.

 

I've bought extended warranties on a couple computers because it was a modest amount of money. One of them (a desktop PC purchased from Best Buy) actually needed a new hard drive and motherboard. On that one, I cleaned up.

 

Like I said, everone that buys warranties has a winning story.

 

My .02 cents.

 

I am late but wanted to remind

this is not extended warranty

this is a

Maintenance Warranty it is ostensibly for dealer to service your car for 75000 or more miles

 

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And again, they are not going to lose money on this. It's intended to drive business to their service department. If you can have the will power to take the money you would spend in it, and stick it into savings for maintenance expenses, you will save money.

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was offered one of these new car maintenance warranties for a car I bought my daughter. I read through it in detail. The coverage had more holes in it than swiss cheese. Looked like a real moneymaker for the dealership, preying on people's fears that their cars would self-destruct after the mfg warranty ran out.

 

That's very unlikely to happen. Other than a few oil changes, tires and brake pads, most cars these days are bulletproof to 100K miles and beyond.

 

If you're worried about not having the money on hand when you might need it, that's a separate issue to deal with. I wouldn't turn to a new car maintenance warranty to solve that problem.

 

Best of luck.

Life is too short to be playing bad music.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I spoke to a service manager of a large dealership

he said he would change trans fluid 30,000 miles! that is, if you want car to last a long time ( 200,000 )

Utter nonsense. This is an unnecessary upsell and you should run, not walk, from this dealer. Maybe change the AT fluid at 80k or 100k, and whatever you do, never flush an automatic transmission, simply have them drain the fluid and replace. Power flushing an automatic transmission is risky with no real benefit.

 

As others have noted, extended warranties are generally a very bad investment. I can only think of two exceptions:

 

* Applecare on Apple products, which generally cover drops and other user stupidity with a reasonable deductible. I've also had them cover things like mice, trackpads, and keyboard at no cost.

 

* Toyota extended warranties on hybrid vehicles. Even this is arguable. I bought an early 2005 Prius, which was the second model year of the 2nd generation Prius, and at that time you could buy the extended warranty from any dealer while the factory warranty was still active. These cars are super reliable, but breakdowns in the hybrid system, while rare, are expensive to repair. Since this was still fairly new tech at the time, I bought my extended warranty from an out-of-state dealer which had been well-reviewed by the priuschat forums. He was selling the warranties for about 1/3 MSRP. The Toyota extended warranty is rare in the automotive world - it's actually issued by Toyota Motor Co, and it shows up on the dealer's service managers screen. I had a few items fixed proactively under the extended warranty.

 

Most automobile warranties are third-party, and the warranty companies will generally try to weasel out of paying any claim. They often don't direct pay either - you pay for the repair out of pocket then get to go haggle with the insurance company for reimbursement. No thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't usually go for maintenance warranties, but I did on my last purchase, a used 2012 Chevy Volt hybrid. As OBDave just mentioned, some of the components in the hybrid system are quite expensive.

The dealer did replace the charger module (which retails for about $1,000) under their own warranty, at no cost to me. There was damage that I did not notice before buying - and the retainers for two of the electrical connectors had broken off. Turned out to take most of the day - the car has three separate cooling systems, there is a special tool for re-filling the cooling system.

 

My belief on car warranties: out of 10 people, 8 will lose money, 1 will break even, and 1 may come out significantly. It is insurance - how much risk to assume. My wife was that last one with a Chrysler LeBaron that she purchased - the automatic transmission failed, which was considerably more than the total warranty cost.

 

Howard Grand|Hamm SK1-73|Kurz PC2|PC2X|PC3|PC3X|PC361; QSC K10's

HP DAW|Epi Les Paul & LP 5-str bass|iPad mini2

"Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen."

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Extended warranties, being a source of additional profit, are also offered by music stores and other retailers besides car dealerships. I usually don't buy extended warranties although I did get one with my last tire purchase. From past experience I have never had the need to use an extended warranty so I prefer to take my chances.

 

When buying a new car an extended warranty is one of the add-ons they give you a hard sell on at the last minute just before you sign the contract. Many people are caught off guard and make an on the spot decision without having time to think it through. Before I go in to make the purchase I calculate my maximum monthly payment and how I can pay the car off in the shortest time. When they give me the hard sell I tell them that it sounds like a good offer but if I stick to my budget I can pay the car off within three years and trade it in when the original warranty is up. BTW, I have one more payment left on my 2015 Outback and with all the miles I do for gigs the warranty was up several months ago.

C3/122, M102A, Vox V301H, Farfisa Compact, Gibson G101, GEM P, RMI 300A, Piano Bass, Pianet , Prophet 5 rev. 2, Pro-One, Matrix 12, OB8, Korg MS20, Jupiter 6, Juno 60, PX-5S, Nord Stage 3 Compact
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couple of observations.

 

If the extended maintenance warranty is offered by the vehicle manufacturer, Toyota or GM for example, and it is an extension of the factory warranty then it may worth getting. If by a third party insurer then it will have deductibles, exclusions and maximum payments per event that mean it is almost impossible for these to be considered good value.

 

On the subject of sealed for life automatics they will get to 100k. They were introduced to minimise the cost of ownership for the first owner, just like longer and longer oil change intervals. The manufacturer is not bothered how long it lasts thereafter.

 

As I buy second hand cars the first thing I do when I buy a car is get all the fluids changed including the sealed for life transmission. Then every two years because:

 

When MB introduced the 5 speed auto 15 years ago they went sealed for life. Within 6 months they issued a dealer bulletin reverting to max 2 years 60k changes. MB would prefer their vehicles are pretty trouble free for 10 years from sale.

 

Oil deteriorates with extreme heat and cold. Synthetics may slow the process, but don't eliminate it.

 

Once it stops lubricating it is metal on metal. The metal clogs up the valve body, pressure drops, the clutch packs slip and burn and then might as well do the solenoids and electronics while we got it out, gets expensive. Out here the ubiquitous ZF 5 or 6 speed sealed for life auto runs $4,500 to $6,000 for a reco.

 

Trannies today are not like the old Torqueflites or FMX's that went forever.

MainStage 3 | Axiom 61 2nd Gen | Pianoteq | B5 | XK3c | EV ZLX 12P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couple of observations.

 

If the extended maintenance warranty is offered by the vehicle manufacturer, Toyota or GM for example, and it is an extension of the factory warranty then it may worth getting. If by a third party insurer then it will have deductibles, exclusions and maximum payments per event that mean it is almost impossible for these to considered good value.

 

On the subject of sealed for life automatics they will get to 100k. They were introduced to minimise the cost of ownership for the first owner, just like longer and longer oil change intervals. The manufacturer is not bothered how long it lasts thereafter.

 

As I buy second hand cars the first thing I do when I buy a car is get all the fluids changed including the sealed for life transmission. Then every two years because:

 

When MB introduced the 5 speed auto 15 years ago they went sealed for life. Within 6 months they issued a dealer bulletin reverting to max 2 years 60k changes. MB would prefer their vehicles are pretty trouble free for 10 years from sale.

 

Oil deteriorates with extreme heat and cold. Synthetics may slow the process, but don't eliminate it.

 

Once it stops lubricating it is metal on metal. The metal clogs up the valve body, pressure drops, the clutch packs slip and burn and then might as well do the solenoids and electronics while we got it out, gets expensive. Out here the ubiquitous ZF 5 or 6 speed sealed for life auto runs $4,500 to $6,000 for a reco.

 

Trannies today are not like the old Torqueflites or FMX's that went forever.

 

Trannies are no longer bulletproof as in some past auto trannies!

 

So my service managers' ( 30,000 mile intervals ) experience, and my instinct to change auto tran fluid is on the money as far as you are concerned? This opinion runs diametrically opposed to "the bologna" manufacturer claims of huge trouble free intervals!

 

My car is a Kia Forte.. so my guy on the QT said auto trannie 30,000 mile changes!

This is not an excessively short interval in your view?

Context here is.. I hope for this to be a long running vehicle, well beyond 150K

- I drive above average miles, as well as a bit higher RPM's .. and it's a 2800 lb car with 147 hp.

Do most auto trans use a full synthetic fluid? I imagine I stick with dealer recommendations on the brand?

 

Oil changes..the service manual says "7500 mile interval"

BUT they also add a grey area - severe conditions, dust, towing, stop and go... and in that case HALF the mileage interval is in the manual 3750!!

Btw i have peace of mind because I switched to full synthetic after 1500 miles and

I figure 5000 max miles on oil and oil filter.

 

While I am inquiring : Brake fluid? Pads.. how soon?

Power steering ?

Radiator?

Shocks ?

 

I want the light in weight car, to feel as close to original, the whole period of ownership.

You don't have ideas, ideas have you

We see the world, not as it is, but as we are. "One mans food is another mans poison". I defend your right to speak hate. Tolerance to a point, not agreement

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the extended maintenance warranty is offered by the vehicle manufacturer, Toyota or GM for example, and it is an extension of the factory warranty then it may worth getting. If by a third party insurer then it will have deductibles, exclusions and maximum payments per event that mean it is almost impossible for these to be considered good value.

 

A friend of mine had an extended warranty for his Volvo from a third party insurer that was absolutely crap. He should have read all the fine print, because when he experienced his first claim, the exclusions and excuses began. One of the worst rip-off cases I'd ever seen. :mad:

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the advice you have been given sounds good.

 

Oil, filter full synthetic engine oil every 5,000 max.

 

All cooling, brake fluids 2 year intervals.

 

If your guy knows Kia and says every 30,000 for the auto then take his advice. Every transmission these days has a specific oil that must be used for that transmission. Again if you guy knows Kia/Hyundai then he will know the exact oil that must be used.

 

FWD and AWD vehicles use transaxles so the transmission oil is also lubricating the diff. That is a lot of moving parts to lubricate. That would explain why 30k interval is recommended rather than the 60k I use which is for RWD transmissions.

 

Shocks deteriorate so slowly you tend not to notice. But most cars use struts now so replacement can be a lot more expensive than shocks in the old days. Shocks wear as they are used, lots of speed bumps or rough roads and shocks and suspension rubbers wear out faster.

 

Power steering should be good unless the boots on the rack tear or get damaged, which is unlikely.

 

Radiators all have plastic tanks which will eventually crack. Varies by manufacturer, BMW seem to get theirs built with a chip that blows the tank up at 50k or 4 years. Toyotas seem to last 10 years. Your mechanic should check the belts and cooling system every service, the tell tale signs of a coolant leak are easy to spot. Belts crack from the inside out and wear can be tricky to spot so every two years for those.

 

MainStage 3 | Axiom 61 2nd Gen | Pianoteq | B5 | XK3c | EV ZLX 12P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"On my last car, it was brakes time.. and dealer wanted around $1000! for all four ( with 59,000 - I still had a few miles on brakes left... not abused ) brakes!"

 

Dang, is this a Maserati? Run from this dealer!!

 

With today's engines and synthetic oils you can safely go 7500 m as long as it's being drivin normally. If you're using it in a x-country road rally thru the desert then yeah you're gonna have problems. Extended warrantys are typically never used (which is what they count on) so it's pure profit for them and a wallet drainer for you. The chevy dealer we just bought from gives free oil changes for as long as you own the car. The only thing we purchased as an extra was the auto butler service cause I hate to wax a car, so they get to do it every 6 months for 4 years.

FA-08
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When buying a new car an extended warranty is one of the add-ons they give you a hard sell on at the last minute just before you sign the contract.

 

That plus the Simoniz and/or interior fabric treatment ripoffs.

When an eel hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that's a Moray.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see no need for extended warranty. It's 100% pure profit above and beyond what was made on the initial purchase. As suggested in this discourse, the dealer selectively applies the warranty and their hourly rate for simple mechanic work is terrible. The best bet is to budget for repairs and do pro-active maintenance on the vehicle(s) you own. You save a lot in the long run and they usually indicate that you have an issue coming up like you need brakes, timing chain, tires etc. and then you can plan for upcoming costs. I usually budget 1000-1500 dollars per year to include tires, oil change, tire rotation and change out of fluids like trans and AWD gear box etc. Some years you only spend 500 some years 1000. That strategy works well for me as I have 4 cars to maintain.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

might be an exception. We carry an America Tires account

 

In the past we always got the $40 'tire protection. There is a bunch of construction in our area and unfortunately our tires pick up nails.

 

Its much easier to have America Tires take care of that.

 

And I had to buy new tires for my CRV last weekend. They included the additional protection for free since we have the account and I bought tires on it. Plus I got a $160 rebate and even better rated tires than before. It was a Thanksgiving weekend/2 day promo. Lucky timing on my part.

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...