Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

What chords are these?


Tusker

Recommended Posts

Can you guys help me.

 

I'm doing a "jazz waltz with modal sensibilities" version of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" for our town holiday party. I ended up with this descending bass line E, C#, B, A ... with these voicings on the piano (from bottom to top):

 

E, C#, F#, B

C#, B, E, A

B, G#, C#, F#

A, G, B, E

 

I've also got this altered chord in there that I am trying to express simply:

 

A, G, C#, F#, A#

 

I've been thinking of this last chord as A#13#9 or F#-9/A UGGH. There must be a better way. Thanks in advance,

 

Jerry

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 15
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Like most voicings of quartal nature, these chords could be named in many ways. The first one could be called an Emaj, C#m7, rootless Amaj, F#m7, or even a Bm7. The second is most definitely an A/C# add9. The fourth is an Em/A or A9sus. The last chord is A13(b9).

 

The sad truth with this kind of chords is that if you try to describe them with chord symbols, you can never be sure that they would be interpreted correctly. Just write them note-for-note. The only possible exception is the last chord, a typical upper structure triad over a dominant chord.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by marino:

Originally posted by Tusker:

Originally posted by marino:

The last chord is A13(b9).

Yes, a flatted 9 you say? :o

Sure. A #9 (also called +9) from an A root would be C natural, or B# (same note).
I know. I was just embarrased at calling a flat a sharp. :o

 

 

:o

 

 

:o

 

 

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, very risky putting up a "what chord is this" thread :eek: .

 

Very much depends on the melody as many of the chords don't have a 3rd so could be major or minor - the melody may fill in the missing harmony. As this is a reharm it would be dangerous to assume the key especially as we don't know where abouts in the tune these chords occur.

 

Taking the chord progression as a stand alone, how about this:

 

1. E6/9 there's no third so could be minor but no 7 hence the 6/9

2. A add9/C#

3. B6/9 (again no third so could be minor)

4. Am9 (not a sus4 chord, sus2? - no third so could be minor or major)

 

The last chord I would notate A7b9 but it does have the 6th so A13b9 might be more accurate?

 

But what do I know - feel free to shoot me down in flames!!

 

PS. don't anyone tell Jazzwee or Legatoboy about this thread ;)

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Manhunter - everything you say is correct, but the real pont is the quartal nature of most of those chords. Assuming that Tusker wants this quality preserved, to notate them with symbols would be nonsense, as another pianist could voice them in lots of different ways.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

E, C#, F#, B

F#sus4/E

 

C#, B, E, A

Esus4/C#

 

B, G#, C#, F#

C#sus4/B

 

A, G, B, E

Em/A

 

A, G, C#, F#, A#

A13b9

 

I wouldn't be embarrassed about calling the Bb an A# - that chord sure looked like an F# triad over an A and a G when you spelled it that way. There's probably some way to play around the F# triad when you solo over it too.

 

As far as all the slash chords I listed - it seems like that's the way they're working, especially seen as a group. Trying to express them using 3rds is an interesting exercise, but pretty much ignores the way they function.

I played in an 8 piece horn band. We would often get bored. So...three words:

"Tower of Polka." - Calumet

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Manhunter - everything you say is correct, but the real pont is the quartal nature of most of those chords. Assuming that Tusker wants this quality preserved, to notate them with symbols would be nonsense, as another pianist could voice them in lots of different ways.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes, I agree. The chords as written have much more meaning than chord symbols which are open to interpretation. As always it's difficult to state in words when the sounds are what's important but I just attempted to put down what one may get in a lead sheet which is only a guide anyway.

 

This is one of the great things about music where you get this sort of ambituaty (sp!!) and it's down to the player's ears and/ability.

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Manhunter:

This is one of the great things about music where you get this sort of ambituaty (sp!!) and it's down to the player's ears and/ability.

Unacceptable. That denies the need for conventional notation.
A ROMpler is just a polyphonic turntable.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by kanker, apparently:

Originally posted by Manhunter:

This is one of the great things about music where you get this sort of ambituaty (sp!!) and it's down to the player's ears and/ability.

Unacceptable. That denies the need for conventional notation.
Did I write that :rolleyes: It was late last night and I was slightly (maybe more than slightly!) drunk. And that your honour is the case for the defence :)

 

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...