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Keyboard -> Piano


davorp

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I play guitar and I have decided to start playing the keyboards to expand my musical knowledge. I bought a cheap digital piano that is actually a synth with a stand that has synth keys. I wanted the one with the piano keys but oh well.... Thing is, how hard it is to switch from playing on the synth ( that has synth keys) to the piano later or the synth that has piano hammered keys?
Davor
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everything is doable, but if you think you are going to switch to real hammer, graded weight action it's better do it now then later. Playing long on synth plastic not weighted, probably without after touch keys can mess up your technique and hand badly. Not to mention expression aspect of playing.
♫♫♫ motif XS6, RD700GX
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Hmmmm... it would be like learning guitar on a Strat with light gauge strings and then switching to a big'ol dreadnought acoustic with really heavy guage strings. All the notes are in the same place, but damn, it takes a heck of a lot more effort to play.
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Originally posted by delirium:

Playing long on synth plastic not weighted, probably without after touch keys can mess up your technique and hand badly. Not to mention expression aspect of playing.

Ummm.... not. :rolleyes:

 

If you meant to say that it's hard to develop a true pianistic skill set by playing on a synth keyboard, I might buy that. However, if you're asserting that one cannot learn to be expressive on a synth, then I must say ... wrong.

 

And what the hell do you mean by "mess up your handly badly"? Are you actually trying to suggest that playing a synth action causes harm to your hand, or is it just more of your not-very-clear prose conveying the wrong message? :rolleyes:

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Stall him out Sven. :D

 

Clean up your thought delirium. ;)

 

davorp, when you decide to make the switch to a weighted action, practice, practice, practice is all you need.

 

Welcome to our instrument. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Originally posted by Sven Golly:

And what the hell do you mean by "mess up your handly badly"? Are you actually trying to suggest that playing a synth action causes harm to your hand, or is it just more of your not-very-clear prose conveying the wrong message? :rolleyes: [/QB]

yes, right, you hand will fall-off and you fingers

start to freak out :freak:

 

If you don't understand post correctly don't comment on it, but read again.

 

And another thing I can tell, you've never played accustic piano probably.

 

Every piano teacher can tell you you can get bad habits playing long on cheap plastic keys.

♫♫♫ motif XS6, RD700GX
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Originally posted by Sven Golly:

Originally posted by delirium:

Playing long on synth plastic not weighted, probably without after touch keys can mess up your technique and hand badly. Not to mention expression aspect of playing.

Ummm.... not. :rolleyes:

 

If you meant to say that it's hard to develop a true pianistic skill set by playing on a synth keyboard, I might buy that. However, if you're asserting that one cannot learn to be expressive on a synth, then I must say ... wrong.

 

And what the hell do you mean by "mess up your handly badly"? Are you actually trying to suggest that playing a synth action causes harm to your hand, or is it just more of your not-very-clear prose conveying the wrong message? :rolleyes:

I thought he meant that by learning on a synth, you will have difficulty being expressive once you go from the synth to the weighted keys, and you may injure your hands from using the technique on hammer action that you learnt from the synth action.
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Classical organ or synthesizer technique is very different from piano technique. If you decide to switch to piano consider taking a few lessons with a qualified teacher to make sure your posture and muscular movement is correct.

Gig keys: Hammond SKpro, Korg Vox Continental, Crumar Mojo 61, Crumar Mojo Pedals

 

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Originally posted by delirium:

If you don't understand post correctly don't comment on it, but read again.

I read your post a half-dozen times. I've yet to be accused of having poor comprehension skills... :rolleyes:

 

You'll notice that other members have also been unclear as to your actual meaning.

 

And another thing I can tell, you've never played accustic piano probably.

Wow... you must be psychic... you're right... I've never even seen an accustic (sic) piano before. :rolleyes:

 

Do me a favour... grab a 4th grade English grammar book and spend a couple of weeks brushing up before you post again; it'll save us all a lot of headaches.

 

Every piano teacher can tell you you can get bad habits playing long on cheap plastic keys.

Yeah... you might end up playing Bach's Prelude and Fugue in G minor or something. :thu:
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It is unlikely that you will be able to develop much useful (physical) piano technique playing unweighted keys. But to Sven's (cleverly disguised) point, there are great pipe organists who make pretty good pianists and vice versa. :thu:

 

I have a steinway and a bunch of synth action keyboards. I have to work up my performance technique leading to a piano performance, but it's hardly dangerous. Especially for pop, jazz, and light classical. I progressed from classical technique to unweighted. Would it have been harder to go the other way? Of course. But not impossible.

 

Now if you desperately want to become the next Rachmaninoff, I'd suggest starting with a piano. Otherwise, play what you got. Enjoy it. When it's time to pick up formal piano, you will want to see engage a teacher and develop some piano technique. At which point you will unlearn the occasional bad habit. But it's not fatal.

 

Jerry

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Actually, folks the whole issue of "dangerous" technique would make a good thread on its own. Back when dinosaurs roamed the earth and I was taking piano lessons, I had a teacher who was sheer death about keeping one's wrists level and using the forearm to aid in getting force to the keys. These days I see far too many players my age complaining about hand and wrist problems after years of playing. I don't have these problems and I thank my teacher. I play both B-3 and piano and own both in addition to the unweighted gig rig stuff. I know how easy it is to get into bad playing habits when the keys don't offer much resistance. For some reason guitar players who switch to keys seem prone to dropped wrists. While perhaps not phrased clearly, the concern over the long term effects of bad technique are not misplaced.
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Duck the issue all you want, delirium... you still have spoken a patent falsehood, and have yet to clarify yourself. Instead, you choose to engage in a personal attack against me. No problem, I'm more than capable of taking it, as I was even at the tender age of 11.

 

I look forward to future opportunities for you to avoid commenting in upcoming threads. :thu:

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