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OT: Chocolate Beer?


ITGITC

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As any GOOD beer snob would know. The flavor of your better Porter's (Dark beer but not stout) will often have a finish (after taste) of a hint of chocolate. I could tell you how they do that but I would have to kill you. Now if we could just get more women to drink this when they crave chocolate more fun would be had by all. Except the sheep.

Jimmy

 

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Originally posted by Is There Gas in the Car?:

If it's not chocolate beer, it's Canadian troops fighting Taliban militants hiding in impenetrable forests of Ten Foot Marijuana Plants in Afghanistan. :eek:

 

What's this world coming to? :rolleyes:

 

CLONK HERE FOR THE STORY

You can count on us to have a good sense of humour about the situation.... :thu:
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My sister does her own home brew and has over thirty different recipes for various chocolate brews -- most of them being stouts, as that is her preferred style. One is a combination of chocolate and cherry, and each recipe differs in the amount of chocolate.

 

As I am hypoglycemic, I have to be a teetotaller. Only occasionally do I even dare taste a sip of her marvellous brew. Even the lighter recipes are probably too strong for the unexpecting guest, but once the taste is acquired, there is no going back.

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Originally posted by Sven Golly:

I'd be interested in what you consider a 'perfect beer'... ;) [/QB]

You know, that one made from water and hops... :D

Here is the home made recipe:

 

1) Sanitize all items that will come in contact with the wort, including the fermenting bucket and any utensils you may be using.

 

2) Pour two gallons of clean water into a large boiling pot.

 

3) Some items may be added to the mixture prior to boiling depending on the recipe, so follow it closely.

 

4) Bring to a boil before adding grains or to the temperature called for in the recipe. The Brewer's Connection "First Brew Pail Ale" kit, for example, asks brewers to bring the water up to 160 degrees before adding the grain.

 

5) Add grain to the pot (in a muslin bag if it is a filtered beer or loose if it is an unfiltered beeräfollow the recipe).

 

6) Stabilize the boil and follow the recipe for times and temperatures during the steeping process (it differs for each recipe).

 

7) Add the malt, hops, moss etc. according to recipe and continue to boil as necessary.

 

8) Cool the wort down to the appropriate pitching temperature of 75 to 80 degrees. The quickest way to do this is to place the boiling pot into a sink of ice water.

 

9) Pour cooled wort into the fermenting bucket.

 

10) Add remaining water and yeast according to recipe.

 

11) Place the lid on the fermenting bucket. Then rock back and forth for 5 to 10 minutes to mix in the yeast.

 

12) Fill the airlock device with iodophor sanitizing solution and insert into the fermenting bucket.

 

13) Store in a cool place that maintains the ideal temperature for the yeast you are using. Ales can be fermented between 66 and 75 degrees, while lagers require cooler temperatures in the 48 to 56 degree range. The fermenting period will also differ depending upon the recipe, so follow it closely.

 

14) After the fermenting period, it is time to bottle. Prep the recycled bottles by thoroughly rinsing and cleaning in the dishwasher. Another option is to soak the bottles in an iodophor solution.

 

15) Sanitize the bottling bucket as well as any siphoning or bottling equipment you will be using.

 

16) Mix 2/3 cup of dextrose with water and heat until clear. 2 or 3 minutes in the microwave does the trick.

 

17) Pour dextrose solution into the bottling bucket.

 

18) Siphon beer from fermenting bucket into bottling bucket, being careful not to suck up any dregs. As tempting as it may be, do not siphon by mouth.

 

19) Fill each bottle and cap.

 

20) Store bottles at room temperature for 7 to 10 days, to allow further fermentation.

 

21) Chill and consume.

 

 

thats it, if you want to have something done well, do it yourself ;)

:thu:

 

 

http://www.azcentral.com/home/beer/articles/0625homebrewhowto.html

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Originally posted by captainmri:

Don't you mean consume and chill?

Methinks it should be...

 

Chill - Consume - Chill.

 

But that's just my opinion. My brother may disagree. He's not much on chillin'. :rolleyes:

 

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Originally posted by BluesKeys:

As any GOOD beer snob would know. The flavor of your better Porter's (Dark beer but not stout) will often have a finish (after taste) of a hint of chocolate.

My wife nicknamed the Sam Adams double bock the "chocobeer". It's seasonal and I haven't seen it in a while. If you don't have any microbrews in your area, this is a good 2nd choice.

 

(The triple bock is a different story. :rolleyes: )

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Originally posted by delirium:

Chocolate Beer??? :freak:

come on why to fix what is perfect already...

 

Thinking about it makes me already sick :D

Um, maybe you didn't notice that it's Miller that's doing this. I would hardly call any of the Miller offerings "perfect".

 

Of course, a Miller chocolate beer will still be mass-produced corn swill. :P

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Chocolate beer goes great with garlic ice cream, which is another food item that sounds grotesque in concept but tastes absolutely heavenly.

 

The concept of peanut butter grossed people out until they actually tried it. My impression is that it is a fairly popular food staple at this point.

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Chocolate beer can't be any worse than pumpkin beer, which also exists. It's made by Blue Moon, and actually, it's pretty damn good.

 

There's more than a few breweries that already have chocolate brews. Sam Adams makes Chocolate Bock and Rogue Breweries makes Chocolate Stout, just to name a couple. Never had the Sam Adams, but the Rogue stout is amazing.

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chocolate beer, in my experience, is a terrible drink. if its marketed as chocolate, it tends to have way too much of the sweet stuff in it. some beer does have a naturally chocolate finish, like some great wines too!

 

also, i've never been a fan of beer that involves blueberries...i did enjoy molsons stingers a while back tho, beer, fruit juice and rum all in a beer bottle!

 

thanks y'all, now i'm thirsty at work:(

so, its not so much about curing it as it is about hiding it...to help spread it faster
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