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Jamming old songs/Rhodes question


MAJUSCULE

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I was jamming with my band at my bassist's the other night, and guess what I was playing. His uncle's vintage Rhodes Mk II 73. Mm-mm! So rich, it's almost creamy!

 

So anyways, we were jamming some old songs to get ready for a show. We've been writing a lot lately, so we haven't played our older songs much. But man, did it ever feel good to just relax and play! After finishing the first song, we all burst out laughing. Just wanted to share the good vibes all y'all.

 

Now to part #2 of my post. I've only ever played that Rhodes, so I really have no idea. But I was wondering what makes it a Suitcase model. This only has volume and low end, whereas I've seen some live with the EQ, tremolo, etc. Was I playing a Suitcase Rhodes? Or did the extra controls only come in later models?

 

Thanks guys!

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IF it has chrome legs it's a a stage. If it has a speaker cabinet under the main body, it's a suitcase. Suitcase and stage have different preamp section.

 

There are some rhodes modified by owners, so some suitcase models can be modified to have chrome legs (leaving the lower cabinet part at home for gigs), and some stage models can have a custom preamp resembling that one from suticase. Stock condition is described in the first sentence, if it has chrome legs it's a stage model.

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Μajucule

I owned the Suitcase and i still own the Mark II model and, yes, it's a pure joy just to sit and play the thing. Plug a delay and a phazer pedal and you're ready to go. Yesterday i felt the same joy as i played my Mark II, and i was thinking what a joy it is to play such an expressive instrument. I hardly need anything else (Hammond apart) to be in pure heaven. Try to persuade your bass player to let you use the Rhodes in gigs or rehearsals. Miracle happen!

Be grateful for what you've got - a Nord, a laptop and two hands
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Majuscule

A Stage can be transfered in a regular "European" car - i got a Citroen C4 and it my Mark II Stage fits inside like a glove. Two people are more than enough to carry it around.

 

I have an even smaller car - an Opel Corsa, and it still fits.

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Just like Pale mentioned, here's the picture version:

 

Rhodes Stage 73:

http://www.fenderrhodes.com/img/models/mark1b/stage73.jpg

 

Rhodes Suitcase 73:

http://www.fenderrhodes.com/img/models/mark1b/suitcase73.jpg

Yeah, that's all good, but it ain't nothin compared to this....

 

 

http://www.vintageguitars.org.uk/graphics/fender72p61.jpg

A ROMpler is just a polyphonic turntable.
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Just like Pale mentioned, here's the picture version:

 

Rhodes Stage 73:

http://www.fenderrhodes.com/img/models/mark1b/stage73.jpg

 

Rhodes Suitcase 73:

http://www.fenderrhodes.com/img/models/mark1b/suitcase73.jpg

Yeah, that's all good, but it ain't nothin compared to this....

 

 

http://www.vintageguitars.org.uk/graphics/fender72p61.jpg

 

Well, this is the American proportion... No car anymore - get a huge van!

Be grateful for what you've got - a Nord, a laptop and two hands
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Ahh, memories. I schlepped my Stage 73 Mark I, ARP String Ensemble and Fender Bassman separates (4x12) in the back of my VW Scirocco back in the early 80's, along with a full size hand truck and GF in the passenger seat. Those were the days...

 

 

..
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Majuscule

A Stage can be transfered in a regular "European" car - i got a Citroen C4 and it my Mark II Stage fits inside like a glove. Two people are more than enough to carry it around.

 

I maybe should have also mentioned that the tuning in the top octave or so is pretty wonky. Also, a low B doesn't sound at all. I haven't had a chance to look inside yet, but I'll have to see if I can do anything about that.

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My local Guitar Center has a used Stage 73 on the floor right now. Spent a half-hour having fun with that the other day. It was pretty tempting to scrounge up the cash and walk out with it.

 

But I wouldn't end up gigging with it. Too much work to keep it in gig shape. And it's heavy. And I have not place to store it if I'm not gigging with it.

 

Yup, time to get out of this store.... :D

 

--Dave

 

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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....I maybe should have also mentioned that the tuning in the top octave or so is pretty wonky. Also, a low B doesn't sound at all. I haven't had a chance to look inside yet, but I'll have to see if I can do anything about that.

 

If it's like the 1970 Rhodes Suitcase I once owned, there are little coils of metal clinging tightly onto what resembles a bicycle spoke wire which is attached to each tine. If you move the coil (which is a small weight) towards the free end of the "spoke", this should flatten the pitch. Caution: I have never opened a 1973-vintage model.

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All the rhodes are tuned like that. Have no fear, it's only a simple mechanism inside. Move the little spring up/down until your key is in tune. Repeat 73 times. Adjust timbre. Go up and down the octave, compare. Adjust pickup distance. You probably have some volume issues now, and timbre changed a bit. Repeat adjusting. Adjust keys that went of tune while you poked the insides trying to make the tine be in the middle of the pickup area. YOur rhodes should be almost ready now. Now you just have to make sure everything is in tune, the timbre is right, the pickup distance is evenly distributed, and you like what you hear. Ah yeah, there's that "one key" that just won't sound the same as the others. Maybe the grommet is stiff, you shoud change that one. Now, after the grommet has been changed, you need to adjust the timbre and tune that key. It's all nice and even now. Time to play.....HEY! THe escapement feels funny, you should adjust that.

...

...

...

1h later

... Ok, escapement is fine now.... but some of the keys aren't in tune now, and the timbre across the keyboard is all messed up now!

 

BUt once you tune it it's golden :D

 

 

Wait... it seems some of the hammertips hardened over the years.... should some be changed ....?

 

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