Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Chet beat Eddie to it!


picker

Recommended Posts



  • Replies 37
  • Created
  • Last Reply

I always loved Chet's playing, and Bob Aslanian (one of my and Al DeMeola's guitar teachers, never met Al though) taught me that technique. I never used it or practiced it however.

 

Anyways thanks for posting that I liked the heck out of seeing Chet play that again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe I've seen that clip before; but I'm happy to see (hear) it again, too! Love the tasty, Jazzy/Country-ish playing and tone, and the harmonized dual-guitar approach to some of it; who's the other guitarist, the guy playing the Les Paul? Seems like I should know, but I can't place him...

 

Also, anybody know what those amps are they're playing through there? Just curious!

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw Ted Nugent do some double handed tapping back about 1969 (Amboy Dukes days)

 

Chet also beat everybody to the whole "sweep picking" thing:

at about 1:13

I learned the sweep technique from a Guitar Player article in the early 80's - by Lenny Breau, who said he got the trick from Chet!

The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side.

- Hunter S. Thompson

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The second guitar player is Paul Yandell, I think. I don't know who the harp conga guy is, and I wondered about the amps myself. I'm told that Chet used Standells for a while, but I wouldn't know a Standell from a biscuit.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw Ted Nugent do some double handed tapping back about 1969 (Amboy Dukes days)

 

Chet also beat everybody to the whole "sweep picking" thing:

at about 1:13

I learned the sweep technique from a Guitar Player article in the early 80's - by Lenny Breau, who said he got the trick from Chet!

 

Well, first off I think techniques are a means to an end musically. Who invented what is irrelevant unless they invented music.

 

But as far as Chet. He was an innovator on many levels. EVH was an innovator on many levels. Personally tapping to me is the LEAST of Eddie's accomplishments. To me he is one of the most gifted rythm players in rock EVER. He raised the bar. But I attribute that also to his mega talented brother Alex.

 

I have seen Chet sweep more than a few times. I have to imagine that technique has also been around for a LONG time. Both of these are very practical applications.

 

In fact, I think had I NEVER heard of tapping-- I would have tried it by now after 27 years because it is very practical. You add another note with your right hand.

 

Being that I don't have huge hands it would be practical for me to do that.

 

Chet's biggest contribution was of course his fingerstyle. That is unquestioned. I love his playing. I prefer Chet's sensibility to Les Paul. So deep and musical. Not to take away from Les Paul. He is a guitar GOD! I just love the warmth of Chet's acoustic guitar. Plus he just looks like the most trustworthy person next to maybe.. Morgan Freeman.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, the thing I like the most in Chet's playing- Chet's music, really- is Chet's personality coming through so clearly in every little thing he does. Very warm, friendly, easy-going, down-to-earth, good natured; he couldn't pretend to be pretentious to save his own life- but maybe he could've for someone else's. Anyways, you can tell it's him from any given little note, Bigsby warble, tic-tac-y bass line... and he did it all so easily, so effortlessly, with an air of understated casual confidence.

 

Well, first off I think techniques are a means to an end musically. Who invented what is irrelevant unless they invented music.

 

But as far as Chet. He was an innovator on many levels.

 

I have seen Chet sweep more than a few times. I have to imagine that technique has also been around for a LONG time. Both of these are very practical applications.

 

In fact, I think had I NEVER heard of tapping-- I would have tried it by now after 27 years because it is very practical. You add another note with your right hand.

 

Being that I don't have huge hands it would be practical for me to do that.

 

Chet's biggest contribution was of course his fingerstyle. That is unquestioned. I love his playing. I prefer Chet's sensibility to Les Paul. So deep and musical. Not to take away from Les Paul. He is a guitar GOD! I just love the warmth of Chet's acoustic guitar. Plus he just looks like the most trustworthy person next to maybe.. Morgan Freeman.

 

Agreed! Good points.

 

EVH was an innovator on many levels. Personally tapping to me is the LEAST of Eddie's accomplishments. To me he is one of the most gifted rythm players in rock EVER. He raised the bar.

 

Also very much agreed. And I'll add that it wasn't that EVH tapped, it was what he tapped- it wasn't the "how", it was the "what"- which was bold, good, new music that carried his personal flare!

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great post Picker...have always loved watching in awe and listening to every clean note Chet picks and he's just as good without any backup...his arrangements are second to none...those small amps sounded great...the tapping was fun to watch...when I was a teenage kid in the 60's there was a guy who played at the San Jose Flee Market every weekend for free (red 335 gibson) who tapped the chords with the left hand tapped the melody with his right...long time before EVH and around the same Merv era...I could stand there and watch and listen for hours...still not a tapper but admire the skill...
Take care, Larryz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It never stops amazing me when I watch truly gifted and talented musicians. I've never been a huge Chet Atkins fan (mostly a head banger growing up) but I've always respected the talent and skill of guys like Chet Atkins and Les Paul.

 

I'm pretty sure my fingers/hands move around the fretboard at least 10x Chet's and they don't produce even 1/10 of the music his does. Compared to him my technique looks like a discombobulated and decaptitated chicken running around. Not pretty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, Django swept quite a bit and also tapped, occasionally, particularly on some of the taller arpeggios. Chet got it from Les Paul, who got it from Eddie Lang; there's a whole list of guys that are more than happy to take credit for the tapping thing, but I've seen 14th century lute tablature with tapped notes. I guess running out of fretting hand fingers isn't a new problem, heh. :) Extended tapping technique involving upwards of four fingers on each hand is fairly modern, I suppose, but I wouldn't be surprised to learn that Paganini did it.

 

 

Oh, and that's Mike Douglas, not Merv Grifffin.

"The Blues ain't got no dental plan."-"Bleeding Gums" Murphy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

CA beat just about everyone to just about everything, didn't he. :laugh:

 

As far as the continuing citation of pre-EVH tappers (I think there was another thread along these lines just recently), it should by now be well-established that there were many, not limited to some already mentioned here & including Emmett Chapman, Zappa, Allman, largely forgotten Deeetroit adroit heavyweight Harvey Mandel & someone who's name escapes me but who Mandel's cited as the cat he picked it up from.

 

My personal fave in this area, who also may be the earliest well-known practitioner is

.

Check also how well he uses his thumb for bass notes.

TF bio

What's hip about Farlow's tapping is it's never a "show" technique but a way of reaching notes otherwise unavailable.

 

[edit: I typed this while Bone was posting his semi-simultaneous comment citing other, earlier players.]

d=halfnote
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was a duet CD, called `Chester and Lester` that my former guitar teacher recommended to me and I`ve never been able to find it.

 

Here ya go, at Ama-zon-dot-com:

 

RCA B000ROAL8A

 

_____________ Chester & Lester

 

_________ http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51mJ9TLRdSL._SS400_.jpg

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, Django swept quite a bit and also tapped, occasionally, particularly on some of the taller arpeggios. Chet got it from Les Paul, who got it from Eddie Lang; there's a whole list of guys that are more than happy to take credit for the tapping thing, but I've seen 14th century lute tablature with tapped notes. I guess running out of fretting hand fingers isn't a new problem, heh. :) Extended tapping technique involving upwards of four fingers on each hand is fairly modern, I suppose, but I wouldn't be surprised to learn that Paganini did it.

 

 

Oh, and that's Mike Douglas, not Merv Grifffin.

 

U right...wrong guy, right era...knew it wasn't Johnny Carson, Jack Paar, Steve Allen, Dick Cavitt...and Merv in the video. :thu:

Take care, Larryz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for Chet vs. Les: Both mens' personalities came through their playing. Chet was more laid back, maybe even cerebral; Les was balls-to-the-wall. I think neither is better than the other, just different flavors.

 

Of course, I did see Chet hit on Lorianne Crook on live T.V. one night...

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was a duet CD, called `Chester and Lester` that my former guitar teacher recommended to me and I`ve never been able to find it.

 

Here ya go, at Ama-zon-dot-com:

 

RCA B000ROAL8A

 

_____________ Chester & Lester

 

_________ http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51mJ9TLRdSL._SS400_.jpg

Buy it. Listen to it. Despair.

 

How so? no one`s ever going to mistake me for competition for these guys.

I aspire to be more like those above me-better than standing on a ledge aspiring to be like those below me, if ya net my drift...

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe I've seen that clip before; but I'm happy to see (hear) it again, too! Love the tasty, Jazzy/Country-ish playing and tone, and the harmonized dual-guitar approach to some of it; who's the other guitarist, the guy playing the Les Paul? Seems like I should know, but I can't place him...

 

Also, anybody know what those amps are they're playing through there? Just curious!

 

Don't look like Standels to me. Too many knobs. Maybe Lab Series? Hard to tell with them stuffed under the piano.

"You never can vouch for your own consciousness." - Norman Mailer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, anybody know what those amps are they're playing through there? Just curious!

 

Don't look like Standels to me. Too many knobs. Maybe Lab Series? Hard to tell with them stuffed under the piano.

 

Yeah, I thought the same- too knobby for Standels, maybe Lab Series (which would make sense- this appears to be a Gibson endorsement review kinda sorta thing!); or, maybe Music Man?

 

 

Oh, yeah; and FWIW, that was a link (in my previous post) to NEW copies of it on CD, in stock, at Amazon-dot-com (US). Iddunno, is there an Amazon-Japan or -Asia that's more applicable for you there??

 

Buy it. Listen to it. Despair.

 

How so? no one`s ever going to mistake me for competition for these guys.

I aspire to be more like those above me-better than standing on a ledge aspiring to be like those below me, if ya net my drift...

 

Not only that, neither of them are any better at being you than you are.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, yeah; and FWIW, that was a link (in my previous post) to NEW copies of it on CD, in stock, at Amazon-dot-com (US). Iddunno, is there an Amazon-Japan or -Asia that's more applicable for you there??

 

 

*There is, but from what I`ve heard by the time you factor in the shipping charges, it`s still cheaper to order from Amazon U.S.-figures.*

 

 

Buy it. Listen to it. Despair.

 

How so? no one`s ever going to mistake me for competition for these guys.

I aspire to be more like those above me-better than standing on a ledge aspiring to be like those below me, if ya net my drift...

 

Not only that, neither of them are any better at being you than you are.

 

*Yeah, and I already know I suck at being any better than they are.* :D

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Caevan,

 

there is an Amazon Jpn actually, the Mrs sometimes uses it, I tend to go the ebay route, I can buy CDs/DVDs & have them delivered to my mailbox then buying new here & often even cheaper than buying used as well, the Japanese get seriously gouged on Cds/DVDs except for a some imported stuff which can be reasonable priced

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Caevan,

 

there is an Amazon Jpn actually, the Mrs sometimes uses it, I tend to go the ebay route, I can buy CDs/DVDs & have them delivered to my mailbox then buying new here & often even cheaper than buying used as well, the Japanese get seriously gouged on Cds/DVDs except for a some imported stuff which can be reasonable priced

 

Oh, OK, then- FWIW- here's a link for that CD via Ama-zon-dot-CO-JP (Amazon-Japan):

 

Chester & Lester

 

I like this write-up on Chet and Les by Rich Kienzle from an Amazon-dot-co-jp 'page (which, in turn, was probably taken from album liner notes or the like):

 

They weren't joined at the hip, yet Chet Atkins and Les Paul were far closer than many realize. Chet's half-brother Jimmy Atkins played rhythm guitar in the Les Paul Trio in the '40s. Both Chet and Les's playing reflected Belgian Gypsy jazz virtuoso Django Reinhardt's influence. They not only created records of monumental importance to guitarists in all genres, but their signature model electric instruments advanced guitar technology. In other words, ample common ground existed for these 1970s collaborations. The first, Chester & Lester, won the pair a Grammy in 1976; Guitar Monsters was the 1978 follow-up. Recorded in a loose, lighthearted atmosphere that bypassed country (except for the tongue-in-cheek "Give My Love to Nell"), these albums explored their roots in the big band era. In some cases, such as "It's Been A Long, Long Time" for Les and "Hot Toddy" for Chet, they revisited songs they recorded years earlier. Les, downplaying his electronic wizardry, proved that he didn't need it to dazzle. Chet, who'd come to favor sterile perfection over passion, unleashed his old intensity in the presence of a fellow virtuoso. --Rich Kienzle

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...