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Never really played with others, this a big jump?


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Okay, so here's the (potential) tricky thing.

 

I've been playing bass for about five years, but in all that time I've never done much more than play alone or occassioanlly (very occassionally) jammed with a couple of guitarist friends.

 

Now I've been wanting to play in a band or somesuch for a while now, and there's a really awesome one that's in need of a bassplayer. Now aside from the slight difficulty of them hoping to be a gigging band and me being stuck with a 15 Watt practice amp, how hard is this potentially going to be for me?

 

I think I've got to a fairly decent standard, and have managed to pretty much nail a few of their songs that I've got by ear in a couple of days practice. But that's just playing along with full tracks, anyone got any advice for potential pitfalls?

 

....I really shouldn't get as panicky as I do, I haven't actually even approached the band yet!!

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You're gonna need to get out there and play with a drummer sooner or later. And it will be rough the first time.

 

Eventually, though, the bassist "sets" the time for the band.

 

You'll need to borrow an amp to make it work, I fear.

 

And if it goes south, please don't take it personally. You must learn how to do this, so dust yourself off and keep going.

 

Good luck

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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One thing I keep in mind is that my chances of making the band are 1/(how many people try out). This could be 20 people or 100. Who knows?

Things I ahve noticed people really care about...

1. Are you easy to get along with and/or like minded if they are very culturally oriented.

2. Can you contribute to writing(sometimes people dont want you to... it jsut depends.

3. Are you dependable, prompt, and as dedicated as they are?

4. Can you play there music well. (these are not in any particular order.

5. do you ahve the gear to do it?

You need to get an amp to play in a band. I would say that even if they have one for you to use you should get your own.

 

I would go into it with the mindset that you really want to play with them without hanging your hopes on it. SO what if you dont make it. just 19 more auditions to go till you do! Not making an audition is a good thing for you also. It means they were not right for you as well in some aspect. Remember you are auditioning them also.

Have fun learning the songs. I dont know what level they are at, but if you are learning them by ear you must be doing alright. Just keep at it and have fun.

I was nervious my first few auditions. But jsut like any other interview, get a good night sleep, dress well(errr... maybe thisone goes out the window... but dont wear reggie cloths to a metal band audition ;) ), be confident...etc...etc.

 

Do they have a myspace page?

 

Jonathan

 

 

 

 

 

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I was typing an elegant response and lost it. Oh well... I agree auditions get easier. Plan on diarrhaea for the first one or two. (there goes the elegance).

 

:freak:

"When I take a stroll down Jackass Lane it is usually to see someone that is already there" Mrs. Brown
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Borrow a bigger amp if you can, or even hire one if you get the chance to audition - there are places in London that hire them out.

 

As you've taken the trouble to learn the songs, that will definitely be in your favour but treat the experience as just that an experience; don't be too down if it doesn't work out.

 

I played a few gigs within a year or two of starting playing, it just depends on the standard of the band, their repertoire and their expectations. You often develop most as a bassplayer playing with others, especially drummer so you need to get out there and just try, even if you just set up your own thing with friends.

 

Anf play through the songs a few times without the CDs to see how you sound.

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Jump on the opportunity. Get out there and have fun. Don't worry about a thing. Hey, you need a bigger amp anyway if you are playing through a 15 watter, that's pretty much a headphone amp anyhow, not that there is anything wrong with it, there a time and place for everything.

 

Play -play - play... You can do it!

"Grab it, stab it, hold it like a heart in your hand".-bnb

If you think my playing is bad, you should hear me sing!
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Go for it. Remember, your hands and brain have been doing it for 5 years. Since you seem to have a computer already, here are some tools I use to learn songs fast:

 

1) Computer (check)

2) POD of some sort or one of those CD trainers

3) Software to manipulate song keys. I use Goldwave to change the pitch and then use its "Time Warp" function to put the song back to its original length(keeps the tempo).

4) Headphones

5) TIME

6) Software to convert audio formats to mp3. Then put ALL of the band tunes on one "data disk" as mp3's.

 

Here is my "woodshed". A POD and bass go to work for use during my lunch hour with their PC:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v245/Johnny_Crab/MyWoodshedFx2.jpg

http://www.myspace.com/theguzzlers

 

Dad gave me a bass when I was 10.

I learned Gloria, Satisfaction, and a lot of Booker T & the MG's.

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Also, as mentioned above....at least a stage-worthy amp. It need not be an SVT or huge rig but does need to be able to keep up with or exceed the drummer's volume AND if it has a direct output(XLR) to go to a PA that is handy.

http://www.myspace.com/theguzzlers

 

Dad gave me a bass when I was 10.

I learned Gloria, Satisfaction, and a lot of Booker T & the MG's.

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Originally posted by Phil W:

. . .play through the songs a few times without the CDs to see how you sound.

Excellent advice-- I've played with guitar players who always practiced with CD's, and couldn't really play without them. If you're practicing with CD's and you hesitate or stop, the music keeps on going. In real life, if you hesitate or stop, the music stops, too. It's a bad feeling if you stumble on a riff, and you feel it ripple through the entire band!

 

I feel that I don't really know a song unless I can play the whole thing from start to finish, with the intro, every verse, chorus, ending and all, with just a metronome. Or without a metronome, for that matter.

 

But you've got to get out and play with other people-- for me (and most other bass players, I suspect) the only reason to play bass is to play in a band.

 

Ed

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if you want to start playing with bands. IMO. this is what i would personally get. a fender rumble. plenty of sound..plenty of power. they sound so increadable for a low price. i cant stress this amp enough! its the best begginer amp you can get so i think.
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The main thing is to listen, not just to the drummer, but everybody. And don't try to impress them with fancy or fast licks; lay down the foundation first, then you can add flavor to your lines with fills. Laying the foundation does not necessarily mean just playing roots, be creative. Don't step on the vocals. Try to be musical and play at an appropriate volume. Show up on time (if the rehearsal is set at 6pm, don't show up at 6pm: get there early to warm up and tune to be ready to play at 6pm). Oh, and have fun! :thu:
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LV - Just been where you are now. Learned a couple of things the hard way-

1. Playing by yourself and "jamming" is a whole lot different that actuall auditioning.

2. You can audition with the practice amp, but they will want to hear you though the stage gear sooner or later. I recommend starting with a 15" combo at a minimum. Plenty of used Peavey 115's lying about.

3. You will realize your ear was lying to you the whole time. You will also be amazed at how fast you get your ear once you start actually playing with a band regularly.

4. Show up with your best axe, prepare to have a beater in reserve (I'm NOT taking my '51 reissue to a biker bar).

5. Get a CD of what the band is playing and listen to it all the time. In the car. In the shower. In your sleep.

6. Pray like hell you don't end up with a pair of flakes for bandleaders like I did with my last two attempts to gig.

 

Bien Suerte!

 

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

 

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Peavey 115 works great for me for such things. It is a little heavy but has wheels.

 

Probably pays to be honest. Try strange songs but if you never heard them or played them before, say so. I had to change keys a couple of times for songs that I learned in a different key.

 

Keep it simple. And listen to all of the advice the others have given. and have fun.

"When I take a stroll down Jackass Lane it is usually to see someone that is already there" Mrs. Brown
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Welcome to the forum longview,

 

A gigging amp is definitely in order for you, and being prepared that way will give you a better chance of getting with a band on your first try.

 

When looking for an amp I would try to find one that will do the job, and is also lightweight as far as amps go. Your back will thank you in years to come. A combo would be a good way to go, and you could look for one with about 300 watts to get started, then add an extension speaker down the road.

 

Good luck getting with a band.

Visit my band's new web site.

 

www.themojoroots.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sorry if this sounds condescending.

 

You should at the least know the names of notes and their corresponding positions on the fretboard.

 

I know you say you have been playing for 5 years (and have jammed with a couple of guitarists), but have you had any lessons, worked from any books, or is the extent of your playing limited to playing along to recordings.

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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I'd say be up front with them and let the band know where you're coming from. Playing with human folk is much more fun than going along with a CD. You'll see up close how parts of a band can feed off the others. The hardest part, to me at least, is getting the feel of the band. Learning the songs is something we all can do but playing with feeling is another aspect of playing.

 

I'm in a similar situation where I've just joined my church band. In my situation, they aren't so concernded about how "brilliant" my playing is, just if I'm willing to learn and be a part of a group. I've been playing for 6 yrs myself (no band experience), and the director was thrilled to have another person wanting to play bass. We've had just one guy holding down the Low End for over a year. Needless to say, both he and the director are happy to have someone help out.

 

If you're dependable and want to learn while adding something new to the band, you might be surprised how open they are to having someone new to playing in a live setting...

 

As far as amps, I have a 350W 4x10. Just the right amount of power for the venue. I imagine you wouldn't need anything more unless you'll be playing some arenas. :) It really depends on you.

 

Good luck!

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