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NGD- Squier Vintage Modified 70s


wraub
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Squier Vintage Modified 70s Stratocaster, acquired for a really good price because the seller listed it with an intermittent pickup. I was hoping it'd be a loose solder joint or similar easy fix- Turned out to just need all the pots rolled back and forth and the 5 way switch moved back and forth a bunch of times, all working now and no other work needed.
I cut off the strings and assertively cleaned the guitar and the grungy fingerboard until I thought enough was enough, restrung with fresh new strings and I think it's a keeper.

Feels about 8 lbs or so, really nice vintage white color and the Duncan Designed pickups sound really good. One small nick in the front, another on the back, otherwise almost new condition. The neck is really impressive, the edges feel rolled and the frets are well done. The neck shape just feels right to me, it's very comfortable.
Now I'll probably sell off a Strat I don't like as much as this one... That one is fine but I almost never play it, I think I've already played this one more than I have that one.

Here's a quick, not especially great picture. Please enjoy.  :)

 


image.thumb.png.5f34c8e8a17b4bf4e98424ed599966cc.png

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I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, wraub said:

Squier Vintage Modified 70s Stratocaster... I think it's a keeper.

Here's a quick, not especially great picture. Please enjoy.  :)


No, you please enjoy... 😉

Congratulations, sounds like a great axe; play the Hell outta that toboggan!

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Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Thanks, all. Apparently though, this isn't a 70s VM, just a VM. I was going by what the seller told me, but some further research says it's a VM, but not the 70s model.

Whatever it's called, I like it.  :)

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I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Additionally-first guitar with slotted tuners, and I am wondering they aren't more commonly used (and why they're disliked by so many). Easy string install and they stay in tune.  :) I like 'em.

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
On 3/10/2022 at 4:31 PM, Larryz said:

Not a fan of slotted tuners (Fender vintage).  I prefer standard and/or locking tuners...I had a Jaguar and a Jazzmaster 62 re-issue and didn't care for the tuners.  A lot of guys do like them though...😎

 

I actually just swapped the basic tuners on my cheapest Strat with Fender Road Worn nickel vintage slotted tuners- really big improvement, the guitar feels and balances better, and the tuners were inexpensive. I'm a fan for sure.

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I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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On 3/10/2022 at 1:27 PM, wraub said:

Additionally-first guitar with slotted tuners, and I am wondering they aren't more commonly used (and why they're disliked by so many). Easy string install and they stay in tune.  :) I like 'em.

 

I do prefer locking tuners to all others but I like the slotted tuners. Cut the string so you have enough to wind around the post3 or 4 times, poke the end down into the hole in the center of the post and wind it to pitch. No string ends to poke your fingers when you bend the headstock!

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On 5/2/2022 at 6:49 PM, Larryz said:

+1 Slotted tuners do get the job done and have a clean look with the string ends poked down the center hole...I can see why Wraub likes them! 😎

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They do look pretty clean, and they work great.

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I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Aaahh, the classic Fender 'Safety Post' tuners!

I kinda like 'em, they're not hard to get the hang of and they live up to their name, as far as eliminating the possibility of pricking ones finger or thumb on the end of a fresh-cut steel string... Ouch! It happens! Those sharp sharp needley ends seem to be a magnet for little children's finners...

However, if I were choosing tuners to begin with, I'd definitely go with Kluson's Locking Revolution line, preferably the collarless H or G Mount with the vintage-style press-in bushings; my favorites, and they have a 19:01 ratio- super smooth fine-tuning!
  
  

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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2 minutes ago, Caevan O’Shite said:

Aaahh, the classic Fender 'Safety Post' tuners!

I kinda like 'em, they're not hard to get the hang of and they live up to their name, as far as eliminating the possibility of pricking ones finger or thumb on the end of a fresh-cut steel string... Ouch! It happens! Those sharp sharp needley ends seem to be a magnet for little children's finners...

However, if I were choosing tuners to begin with, I'd definitely go with Kluson's Locking Revolution line, preferably the collarless H or G Mount with the vintage-style press-in bushings; my favorites, and they have a 19:01 ratio- super smooth fine-tuning!
  
  

I haven't tried the Kluson's but now that I've put 2 sets of the Graph Tech Ratio Locking Tuners on other people's guitars (and I am about to have a repeat customer), I wouldn't use anything else. The included mounting plates allow fast, solid installation without compromising the originality of the guitar and the ratio system makes for the easiest, most accurate tuning experience I've ever tried. 

 

They've blown everybody else completely out of the water. Just sayin'.

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21 hours ago, KuruPrionz said:

I haven't tried the Kluson's but now that I've put 2 sets of the Graph Tech Ratio Locking Tuners on other people's guitars (and I am about to have a repeat customer), I wouldn't use anything else. The included mounting plates allow fast, solid installation without compromising the originality of the guitar and the ratio system makes for the easiest, most accurate tuning experience I've ever tried. 

 

They've blown everybody else completely out of the water. Just sayin'.


I understand that those are excellent tuners, from what I've read (I haven't tried them).

I also understand that they use different ratios for different strings, to change the turns-ratio per each string.

However, judging from my general tuning experience, I cannot imagine that I'd want ANY of the strings having any less than an 18:1 (certainly no less than 15:1!) ratio. Judging by the example info on the Graph Tech site, I'd want to at least swap the 1st/High-E tuner from their set to one with a 20:1 ratio (like their 2nd/B) or greater.

Again, I haven't tried them, so maybe I'd be pleasantly surprised by their ratio choice for the 1st-string; if so, I'd be happy to be wrong.

I really like the vintage peg-hole size and vintage look (including the option of press-in bushings, instead of hex-nuts) of the Kluson Locking Revolution sets, though! Further points in their favor for me...
   
 
 

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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35 minutes ago, Caevan O’Shite said:


I understand that those are excellent tuners, from what I've read (I haven't tried them).

I also understand that they use different ratios for different strings, to change the turns-ratio per each string.

However, judging from my general tuning experience, I cannot imagine that I'd want ANY of the strings having any less than an 18:1 (certainly no less than 15:1!) ratio. Judging by the example info on the Graph Tech site, I'd want to at least swap the 1st/High-E tuner from their set to one with a 20:1 ratio (like their 2nd/B) or greater.

Again, I haven't tried them, so maybe I'd be pleasantly surprised by their ratio choice for the 1st-string; if so, I'd be happy to be wrong.

I really like the vintage peg-hole size and vintage look (including the option of press-in bushings, instead of hex-nuts) of the Kluson Locking Revolution sets, though! Further points in their favor for me...
   
 
 

The Ratio tuners are a complete experience. You should ask around and see if you can try them on somebody's guitar. You'll like them. 😁

 

"I also understand that they use different ratios for different strings, to change the turns-ratio per each string."

 

Yes, they do that, they EQUALIZE the tuning so you can quiclkly get each string into pitch using the same turns. Typically the 6th string on a set of tuners will be very responsive and difficult to get those fine increments. The Ratio tuners correct that problem and the consistency between strings is something I didn't have to get used to, I loved it from the first time I used them. 

 

FWIW, I don't give guitars back after a repair/modification until they've settled for a day or two. This helps insure that everything is as it should be. I haven't spent a long time with the Ratios but both the installation and the results were compelling in a positive way. 

With the Ratio tuners, turning each tuner one full turn will adjust the pitch of each individual string more or less the same amount (whole step, half step, etc. they have that in print somewhere). That makes tuning the guitar so much easier it's hard to describe. I can easily tune the 1st string on a set with a 12:1 ratio but not the 6th string. 

I've had many guitars in the shop that arrived with finish damage caused by owners fiddling about with ferrules, they are one of the most diffiult things to remove and/or replace (and one of the most common causes of finish damage).

 

That said, the first guitar I put Ratios on was an immaculate Dean Cadillac from the original Dean factory. It had the original, old Klusons on it. The Ratio tuners came with a full set of Kluson mount plates, I just unscrewed the Klusons, put the plates on and was able to mount the Ratios. The tuner holes (and screw holes) that were stock to the guitar remained unchanged. Years of experience, I have a technique for removing ferrules that works very well and so far has not caused any finish chips around the edges of the tuner holes on the front of the headstock (I've seen some really "pretty" accidents here). In other words, a fast, painless direct swap and the original tuners can be replaced with zero change to the guitar, keeping it's value. 

 

The second guitar was a friend's 1980 Gibson ES-335, again bone stock. He purchased it from the widow of a former band mate. It had the old USA made Grovers from the factory. Those are crap tuners, cast gears - the newer Korean made Grovers are much better. Same thing, the Grover mount plates are also provided. Take old tuners off, put new tuners on - it takes just a few minutes and the original tuners could be put back on with no change to the guitar. 

 

So yeah, from a guitarist's perspective and a guitar tech's perspective - Graph-Tec clicked all the boxes with the Ratios. Mounting plates are included for several of the most popular original tuners, they are easy and safe to install and they work better than any other tuner I've tried - by far. 

 

Now if I could only afford to put them on all of my guitars!!!!! FWIW, both of my Rainsongs came with 18:1 tuners and they are pretty nice but the 6th string is still a bit "squirrely". It always feels weird on the 12 string because the low E string shifts pitch much more than the octave string with the same amount of peg turning. 

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7 hours ago, KuruPrionz said:

I've had many guitars in the shop that arrived with finish damage caused by owners fiddling about with ferrules, they are one of the most difficult things to remove and/or replace (and one of the most common causes of finish damage).


Yeah, best pressed in (or out) instead of hammering or God knows what, and quite possibly requiring a little reaming and/or chamfering with a carefully finger-spun counter-sink. (I need to get a new one, a couple of nice ones and other cool tools that I had apparently grew legs and wandered off... !)
           
 

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~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I used a nice new tapered reamer that was sharp enough to get it done quickly- definitely have to be sure the peghead hole is properly sized for the bushings.  I chose the tuners I used for the vintage vibe and their light weight, the guitar they're on is really light and I wanted to keep that and prevent neck dive. Also, they were inexpensive, direct from Fender, and nickel, which I prefer to chrome. Easy sell.

 

As to other tuners, I may be about to install some Gotoh Magnum Lock tuners on the Firefly. The stock ones are okay, and hold tuning alright, but there's still a few typical LP style tuning issues. I was thinking having locking tuners would alleviate that, but haven't fully committed to doing the work as yet. I think it's because the tuners I got look like vintage LP tuners and I'm not trying to have the guitar look any more like an LP.  :D

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I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, wraub said:

I used a nice new tapered reamer that was sharp enough to get it done quickly- definitely have to be sure the peghead hole is properly sized for the bushings.  I chose the tuners I used for the vintage vibe and their light weight, the guitar they're on is really light and I wanted to keep that and prevent neck dive. Also, they were inexpensive, direct from Fender, and nickel, which I prefer to chrome. Easy sell.

 

As to other tuners, I may be about to install some Gotoh Magnum Lock tuners on the Firefly. The stock ones are okay, and hold tuning alright, but there's still a few typical LP style tuning issues. I was thinking having locking tuners would alleviate that, but haven't fully committed to doing the work as yet. I think it's because the tuners I got look like vintage LP tuners and I'm not trying to have the guitar look any more like an LP.  :D

An Irwin Unibit is my go to for enlarging tuner holes. You need a drill press to use it properly. 

A bit of a trick with a Les Paul, maybe have a friend support the body? 

Clean, perfectly round holes and the bit self-centers. Once I tried the Unitbit, my tapered reamers have just sat around. 

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