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Can you "tap in" to your amps AC cord to power a pedal?


SteveC

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I sometimes like to use a compressor. I have a BBE Opto Stomp that seems to do the trick for me. I don't really want to drag the AC adapter for the BBE along and I like that I have just one thing - my amp - to plug in. No multi strips, ground issues, etc. I also don't want to use a battery for the compressor. Expensive, don't last that long, etc.

 

So I'm wondering...the BBE doesn't draw that much power. Could one splice into the power going to your amp and use that to run the pedal as well? I'm thinking strip the insulation and find the "+" and "-" and do the same with the end of the AC cable for the BBE.

 

What would I mess up doing this? Does it make any sense?

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If you mess with the integrity of the power lead you will run the risk of it separating and causing a fire or electocution.

 

If the lead fails on a gig you'll be stuck.

 

To do it properly you'll need to use a proper junction box and still will need the transformer anyway.

 

Waste of time.

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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You would still need a wall wart of some sort to convert the 120 volt AC going into your amp to the 9 volt DC your pedal needs. If you ran a line straight from the power cable without one, you would fry your pedals. And anyway, you would still have another cable running to the pedal, so you wouldn't accomplish what you want to do. So if you don't want to use batteries, I'm afraid you're probably stuck with the wall wart.

 

But I do recall hearing something about a setup that provides phantom power for pedals along with your instrument's signal, through a 1/4" T-R-S stereo cable. But you'd have to modify your pedal for it to work on that system, if I recall correctly.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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Since you are not a double E, you have answered your own question: no YOU can't. And since no one else has ever done it, there is a pretty clear indication that it is not a very practical solution. If it was practical, most amps would be offering power output jacks for pedals, and as far as I know, nobody does.

 

most pedals run on DC, your line cord is AC. Most pedals expect to see either 9 or 18 volt power supplies. Wall power is 120 volts. AC is not DC, 120 volts is not 9 or 18 volts.

 

 

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

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You try that and you're going to FRY that pedal BIG TIME!

The circuitry in the pedal is designed for 9 volts DC (maybe 18, I'm not familiar with those pedals) and an AC surge like that will overload them and possibly give you a heck of a jolt!

Put your pedals on a board and use a multiple outlet battery adapter, Or use batteries, or don't use a pedal.

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Sorry Steve, I wasn't trying to be cheeky I just think that electricity is crazy dangerous. I was fried very early in playing career by lifting a guitar players effect pedal out of the end. Ever since I've not been a fan of tampering/overloading or messing with anything other than proper power supplies.
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Wow. This just sounds....lazy.

 

Your amp is designed to run at 110 V ac. And if the engineers who designed it are bright enough, they've got a switch on it so that you can run it 220 V if you travel abroad.

 

As for your pedal? It's designed to run on DC at 9 or 18 V using that AC adaptor. There's a stepdown transformer built into that AC adaptor so that you're not overpowering your pedal with 110 V.

 

Just get one of these and plug both your amp and your pedal into it.

 

http://images.orchardbrands.com/blair/assets/product/customers/c696/P-5506/generated/P-5506_default_variant_200x200.jpg

 

....But get the grounded version (three prong outlet). I think that everyone who's playing through an amp should have some kind of extension cord as part of their kit. And you'd also do well to be carrying a grounded adaptor with you in your gig bag at all times, too.

 

Power systems are not something to be trifled with. I've got a bunch of family in the electrical business and safety with electricity is no joke to them. They're the professionals. And don't forget that some musicians have met tragic ends because of shoddy electrical work.

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This would maybe help - still have to use the wall wart but only one AC cord...

 

http://www.samedaymusic.com/product--HOSPWD4

 

There's nothing wrong with that. You'll just be drawing more current from the same outlet (something that always happens with power strips).

 

Your original idea of trying to splice a wire and coaxial 9V connector onto your IEC cable without a transformer in-line is a perfect way to access the fresh, toasty aroma of a fried circuit board, but not at all advisable if you're trying to play a gig.

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None of us really like the 'Clark Griswold Special' when it comes to stacked plugs and power strips, but sometimes it's a necessary evil. That power cord with the built-in 'T' was probably created by someone with the same question you had.

 

Really, that is a pretty slick idea. It does make me wonder if you plug a pedal/ transformer into it if it makes your amp more susceptible to noise, etc. with the plug being right on top of the connector to the amp.

 

 

"Political language... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind"- George Orwell
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Regarding multi-way adaptors.

 

Every plug has less than perfect contact with the socket and you always get resistance. The resistance leads to heat, the heat leads to higher resistance, this leads to more heat, you see where this is going?

 

Daisy chaining should be avoided. ie don't plug one into the next and then another one into that one. You are better off having one centeral one that all the others plug into. A 4 way on a long lead for each band member works best for us, even if they don't need it (our drummer had a fan and some people had music stand lights etc).

 

Always use the multiway outlets that come on a lead, NOT one with lots of outlets on the same block that then plugs directly into an outlet.

 

With the flat version you are less likely to have heat build up.

 

Having lots of multiway connectors is not a bad thing as long as you don't try to connect lots of high current devices eg lights and amps.

 

Always uncoil a lead before you use it. It will turn into a giant electromagnet, heat up and melt itself together and eventually catch fire. Even at 50% of its rated current!

 

With an AC adaptor the DC output is about 300-1000mA at 9v that's between 3 and 9 watts or 75mA (0.075A) max, compared to your amplifier at 1A per 120watts. The AC adaptor is insignificant.

Feel the groove internally within your own creativity. - fingertalkin

 

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Just get one of these and plug both your amp and your pedal into it.

 

http://images.orchardbrands.com/blair/assets/product/customers/c696/P-5506/generated/P-5506_default_variant_200x200.jpg

 

....But get the grounded version (three prong outlet). I think that everyone who's playing through an amp should have some kind of extension cord as part of their kit. And you'd also do well to be carrying a grounded adaptor with you in your gig bag at all times, too.

On point. I keep one of these in my backpack with all my cables and whatnot:

http://www.summitsource.com/images/products/ACS100.jpg

And one of these when I play any place I haven't played before or I know doesn't have good power access:

http://www.kwtool.com/catalog/images/22222222222222.jpg

 

...and I carry all my gear on my back to gigs so I can't help but laugh at the idea of a power strip or powered pedal board being too much hassle.

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