Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Lowest note ever


anderz

Recommended Posts

The lowest note in the galaxy is a Bb, 57 octaves below middle C. I found this out 2 days ago while I was reading my record book, and proof is below:

 

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/blackhole_note_030909.html

 

Its decibel level is more than a million billion times lower than the human ear can detect. Pretty jaw dropping, huh?

 

Stick it to the man.

 

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/anderseb/

 

(Muh homepage of greatness)

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 44
  • Created
  • Last Reply
Bb, 57 octaves below middle C

 

...the saddest of all notes

Dan

 

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The lowest note in the galaxy is a Bb, 57 octaves below middle C.

 

When I play this note, I usually play it on the flat side.

 

Go to 'global' settings, you can change the pitch from there -

 

then you'll be totally in touch with the universe.

 

 

This is what we're talking about, yeh?????

John.

 

some stuff on myspace

 

Nord: StageEX-88, Electro2-73, Hammond: XK-1, Yamaha: XS7

Korg: M3-73 EXpanded, M50-88, X50, Roland: Juno D, Kurzweil: K2000vp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The lowest note in the galaxy is a Bb, 57 octaves below middle C.

 

When I play this note, I usually play it on the flat side.

 

Go to 'global' settings, you can change the pitch from there -

 

then you'll be totally in touch with the universe.

 

 

This is what we're talking about, yeh?????

 

I just use the pitch bend. :thu:

 

I find the concept hilarious, "Lowest note". .00000000000000000000000001 hz. :laugh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably just as well: if we could hear that note, we'd probably shit ourselves.

 

I don't suppose anyone remembers the Mike Pindar article on the power of the Mellotron and inaudible low cycles that dates back to 69 or 70 where he half dreams and half theorizes having a note so low on the Mellotron that the audience literally has a collective brown out.

 

That would be a low note.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably just as well: if we could hear that note, we'd probably shit ourselves.

 

I don't suppose anyone remembers the Mike Pindar article on the power of the Mellotron and inaudible low cycles that dates back to 69 or 70 where he half dreams and half theorizes having a note so low on the Mellotron that the audience literally has a collective brown out.

 

That would be a low note.

 

I think this ground has already been covered now Rich - there ain't nothing that compares to that

 

zillionth of a billionth (or whatever - it doesn't really matter anymore) of that Galactical low-point of Hz.

 

I wonder what Mr Heinrich Hertz is thinking now? - he's probably spinning (very very slowly) in his grave.

 

 

But I agree - a total brown-out at a mellotron concert would be quite a sad day for society.....

.

 

John.

 

some stuff on myspace

 

Nord: StageEX-88, Electro2-73, Hammond: XK-1, Yamaha: XS7

Korg: M3-73 EXpanded, M50-88, X50, Roland: Juno D, Kurzweil: K2000vp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's been said that ELP wanted to do something similar in their heyday. They knew that if they could generate a low enough tone (at a loud enough volume) that the audience would experienece a mass "brown out". Only trouble was, the band and anyone else in the vicinity would suffer the same fate. Nobodys bowels would be immune.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They have it all wrong. That's not a low note. It's very dark light.

 

That reminds me of a Steven Wright quote -

 

"ok, the speed of light is 186000 mph - what is the speed of dark?"......

John.

 

some stuff on myspace

 

Nord: StageEX-88, Electro2-73, Hammond: XK-1, Yamaha: XS7

Korg: M3-73 EXpanded, M50-88, X50, Roland: Juno D, Kurzweil: K2000vp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm afraid to ask what would be the highest note.

 

I'm sorry to admit that I did the arithmetic. A mere 40 octaves above A440 is orange. But it's those gamma rays and cosmic rays that'll fry your tweeters.

 

This deserves a show on the Discovery Channel. Hosted by Steven Wright. :D

 

 

 

 

--wmp
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A mere 40 octaves above A440 is orange.

 

Ok, so if we're all agreed that the lowest note is a mellotron-induced shade of brown, and the highest is orange -

 

what, exactly, is in the middle?

 

Are we to think that we're in a comfort-zone of autumn colours, or is there someone out there who's going to toss a swerveball in,

 

and keep us all awake tonight wondering at the significance of our very existence? :rolleyes:

 

 

My money's on red.

John.

 

some stuff on myspace

 

Nord: StageEX-88, Electro2-73, Hammond: XK-1, Yamaha: XS7

Korg: M3-73 EXpanded, M50-88, X50, Roland: Juno D, Kurzweil: K2000vp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry. Red covers the notes between F and Ab below the orange A. The highest visible note is violet, the F above the orange A, which might sound a little red if you don't have perfect pitch. There's only one lousy octave of visible light, and that's midrange compared to cosmic rays.

 

I did a little math abuse on that low Bb, 57 octaves below middle C. That works out to .00000000000000161346 Hz, which would take 619786049855589 seconds, or 19,639,834 years to complete one cycle.

 

These guys can't explain the gravity in the universe because they say there isn't enough matter to account for it. I can't explain all the bullshit on earth, because there aren't enough bulls to account for it.

 

 

 

 

 

--wmp
Link to comment
Share on other sites

... I did a little math abuse on that low Bb, 57 octaves below middle C. That works out to .00000000000000161346 Hz, which would take 619786049855589 seconds, or 19,639,834 years to complete one cycle ...

OK, now we're getting somewhere. Now I want to know what string length to set on a Roland V-Piano to model this note decently. I figure that the string length of the lowest Bb on a Steinway D is about 2.5 meters. If I double the string length per octave to maintain approximately the same string tension I calculate my string length for the lowest Bb in the Universe will have to be just over 48 quintillion kilometers.

 

And once I get the Roland set up to play it, you know what I'm going to do?

 

Play the low A.

 

And I'm going to hold it down with a knife Emerson-style.

 

Larry.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...