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The King - 30 years later....


miroslav

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So it's been 30 years since his death...this week is "Elvis Week"...

...and his fan base has not really shrunk at all, actually it seems to have grown.

 

Is Elvis still the King of Rock & Roll...and does modern rock still contain some of the vibe and tone that Elvis laid down 50 years ago...?

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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Elvis jokes aside... :)

 

...does his spirit still survive in modern rock?

 

I think his stage presence and his sexual rock persona formed a mold that many other rockers that followed were shaped from, and many have tried to emulate (to this day)....though often falling short.

 

His music may seem a bit dated to the younger gens...but his influence, IMO, is still felt today in a big way.

 

I still have a few original Elvis vinyl albums and 45s from when I was a kid.

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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Wasn't it John Lennon that said, "if there was no Elvis, there wouldn't have been any Beatles"? Yes I would consider him the King even though I wasn't raised on him nor I don't own any of his records. I have played many covers of his, though.

 

I wonder what the statute of limitations is on the annual news announcement celebrating his birthday. Are we going to someday hear, "Today is Elvis' birthday. He would have been 145 today."

 

Eric

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Charisma.... He was a white boy who sang with the soul of a black man... He was cutting edge for his time... He also had one of the greatest promoters but, worse managers in the business...

The Colonel knew how to get the most out of Elvis but it cost Elvis his life...

I am an Elvis fan but my mother actually has an Elvis 'Shrine' in one of her rooms and she's almost 80...

I went to Graceland once and was enlightned, for lack of a better word, by his digs... The place was small actually... But I swear I could feel a vibe... (or was I high) Anyway... Elvis IS the King!

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I was stationed as NAS Millington (just outside of Memphis) when he died. I'd seen some of his movies, his latest TV concerts (he had become fat) and had a record, but didn't comprehend what his impact had been on the music scene.

 

Funny thing, I've learned that one of the guys in my graduating class of 125 from Waupaca, WI became an Elvis impersonator. I've heard he does a pretty good job, too. Has the sideburns and all...

Raise your children and spoil your grandchildren. Spoil your children and raise your grandchildren.
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In my humble opinion...black people aren't afraid to get closer to the roots of any music.

It's an honesty that Jimi Hendrix, most blues musicians, many rockers, jazz musicians, etc...show exactly that and their music in so many genres of music reflect that.

 

Hence, when you get people that LEARN from that lesson such as Hank Williams Sr, Elvis, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Jerry Lee Lewis, many British and American rockers, etc...you can hear that same honesty and earthiness in their music as well.

 

I think this was what made Elvis's music enjoyable.

 

It's a no holding back, personal, putting your feelings on the line and up for possible ridicule kind of music.

It takes a fairly brave person to do that but when it clicks, it's timeless. :)

 

Randy

"Just play!"
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In my humble opinion...black people aren't afraid to get closer to the roots of any music.

 

Randy

 

Sorry, Randy, I find that a strange statement. The guys you are referring to are not run of the mill musicians either.

 

The roots of rock, soul, pop, jazz etc music are in the Black American experience (with some notable exceptions). Usually, historically, I reckon the black community have been more ready to move on to newer more modern and fashionable forms of their music and less likely to explore 'roots' music, Hendrix was an exception and (to generalise horribly) drew the majority of his audience from white people. I hate to generalise though but I was puzzled by your comment.

 

The more I listen to Elvis, the more I realise that IMHO he got his sound, his passion and his music from the Church. It was Pentecostal passion and intensity that got America moving. No different to the way that soul singers took the sound of the church to mainstream secularism and the complex relationship of wandering street preachers and itinerant bluesmen (who often played the same repertoire).

 

This is a fun 'fake' interview:

 

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/omm/story/0,,2123641,00.html

 

 

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Good points Phil and are respected. :)

 

Elvis Presleys musical influences were the pop and country music of the time, the gospel music he heard in church, at the all-night gospel singings he frequently attended, and the black R&B he absorbed on historic Beale Street as a Memphis teenager.

 

I think what caused me to make that statement, is that I'm originally from Montgomery, Alabama.

It's the home of Hank Williams Sr.

Hank Sr. learned from and got his country/blues roots from an old black man named Titot(sp?).

Yes of course, the South in general is, and still today, steeped in Christian religion to include it's music.

 

For a couple of years, I used to live in a little southern town called Lowndesboro when I was 8 and it was situated between Montgomery & Selma.

It was small Antebellum town from the old south era and about 1/8 of a mile down the road was a really nice, old clap board African American church.

The music on Sundays would just draw you there like a magnet.

I used to go down there and just LISTEN til the service was over.

This was around 1965 and those little things just seem to stick in your head, you know?

 

At that time I didn't even play a musical instrument and I was 13 before I started playing the clarinet in school and then later at age 16, I started on the acoustic guitar.

But I can see and feel that influence on me today and so I guess I can relate to others having that influence as well.

 

But if you look back to Rock & Roll's roots and their influences, they'll all mention the older black bluesmen.

 

Having been brought up in the church as well, I can tell you, the music was MUCH better in the black churches! :):D

 

I can't see the blues connection from "Onward Christian Soldiers" but I really can from the black church that I used to sit outside and listen to....even though by the time I got there, it was 1965 and past tense.

The feel is there and I would suspect, it always has been.

 

Am I saying that one race is better than another musically?

Certainly not, but when it comes to the blues...it just seems to come naturally to my brotha's. ;):D

 

I guess what I'm saying is...the music and lyrics seem to be more down to earth and carries a piece of their soul.

 

Yes, corny statement...but that's what I'm hearing.

 

Randy :)

 

Hank Williams Sr excerpt:

 

Local influences shaped Hank's music more profoundly than the big stars of the day. The gospel songs of both the black and white communities taught him that music, whether sacred or secular, must have a spiritual component. He learned traditional folk ballads and early country songs from neighbors and friends, and blues from a local African-American street musician, Rufus Payne (also known as Teetot). Payne not only taught Hank how to play the guitar, but helped him overcome his innate shyness. The blues feel that suffuses much of Hank Williams' work is almost certainly Teetot's legacy.

 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/database/williams_h.html

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He was great, but I'll go out on a limb and say it: he couldn't act.

Neither could John Wayne but when you're Elvis or John you don't have to... It's their presence...

 

I have to disagree with both statements. Elvis and John Wayne made many movies where they played a type or just 'themselves', because it was a successful formula that worked. If you have ever watched 'The Searchers', you know that the statement "John Wayne couldn't act" is a falsehood.

 

Elvis really tried in some of the early films, notably "Loving You", "Jailhouse Rock", and "King Creole". But the people making his films were interested in the bottom line, not developing a new James Dean.

"I'm very easy to please. I just want everyone in the palm of my hand."

--Duke Ellington

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I hear that Elvis isn't writing songs anymore. In fact, he's decomposing...

Now that's funny stuff... But did Elvis ever write a song? I don't think he did... Just wonderin'...

 

He was credited as a co-writer on "Love Me Tender." I doubt he actually had any input on the song. I always figured it was just a deal to get him a piece of the publishing royalties.

 

Other than that one song, I am not aware of any writing credits for Elvis.

 

I feel bad for all of the tourists going to Memphis this week. I believe the forecast is 100+ degrees F every day plus totally stupid humidity (thank you Mississippi River).

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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I agree...the Duke's dry acting style may not impress a lot of people...but he sure could act in the roles he played. There are a lot of actors that just play one or two roles their entire acting career.

 

As far as Elvis' acting...you have to check out some of the non-musicals that he did. He was never going to be a major dramatic actor...but he did no worse than many others.

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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Actully...Elvis is credited with writting a LOT of songs...

...a quick check at the US Copyright Office wil show that.

 

A lot of them co-written with Otis Blackwell...or Vera Matsen...etc.

 

But how much did Elvis really contribute to the writting...???...we may never know.

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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Great post, Randy, I respect that. I hear where you're coming from when I realise you're from the South. That makes a lot of sense.

There's a neat book - People Get Ready about the history and development of Spirituals and eventually Gospel music - the evolution of popular music is a fascinating subject.

 

I think you're spot on in terms of Elvis' musical influences.

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I hear that Elvis isn't writing songs anymore. In fact, he's decomposing...

Now that's funny stuff... But did Elvis ever write a song? I don't think he did... Just wonderin'...

 

He was credited as a co-writer on "Love Me Tender." I doubt he actually had any input on the song. I always figured it was just a deal to get him a piece of the publishing royalties.

 

Other than that one song, I am not aware of any writing credits for Elvis...

 

Well, neither Elvis nor his co-writer wrote the music for Love Me Tender. The tune was a direct ripoff of Aura Lee. Of course I doubt copyright law gave any money or credit to the original writer. It was fairly commonplace to borrow melodies for new songs prior to the era of the publication and recording industries.

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Actully...Elvis is credited with writting a LOT of songs...

...a quick check at the US Copyright Office wil show that.

 

A lot of them co-written with Otis Blackwell...or Vera Matsen...etc.

 

But how much did Elvis really contribute to the writting...???...we may never know.

 

Just like Alan Freed co-wrote all of those tunes. ;):)

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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I hear that Elvis isn't writing songs anymore. In fact, he's decomposing...

Now that's funny stuff... But did Elvis ever write a song? I don't think he did... Just wonderin'...

 

He was credited as a co-writer on "Love Me Tender." I doubt he actually had any input on the song. I always figured it was just a deal to get him a piece of the publishing royalties.

 

Other than that one song, I am not aware of any writing credits for Elvis...

 

Well, neither Elvis nor his co-writer wrote the music for Love Me Tender. The tune was a direct ripoff of Aura Lee. Of course I doubt copyright law gave any money or credit to the original writer. It was fairly commonplace to borrow melodies for new songs prior to the era of the publication and recording industries.

 

Aura Lee written by George Poulton, W.W. Fosdick (1861)written in the first year of the Americal Civil War.

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COol...thanks!! :)

 

Hey man, you know what's cool?

 

It's that actual tracing of the music brought to AMerica by the slaves, and then to follow it progress on through the years.

When you finally get to the first blues and jazz, it's almost like witnessing a birth. :):D

 

Lot's of good individual stories lying around when you can find them.

 

I'll have to pick this one up. It's looks enticing.

 

Randy

"Just play!"
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