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Sticky feeling keys


Bobsk8

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Worked the last 2 days on an outside Jazz gig in Atlanta where the temperature was about 95 degrees. We had fans, but the problem I was mainly having was that the keys felt "sticky", when I was playing, like I had something on my fingers. Anyone found a solution for that problem?
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I've had that problem. The only solution that's worked for me is to constantly wipe the sweat off of my head/neck and onto my hands, and onto the keys. Sound a little weird, but it works for me.
A ROMpler is just a polyphonic turntable.
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:sick: I vote for stashing a few WetNaps in your pocket, and washing your hands periodically during the show.

"Oh yeah, I've got two hands here." (Viv Savage)

"Mr. Blu... Mr. Blutarsky: Zero POINT zero." (Dean Vernon Wormer)

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I don't think that it's an issue of hands not being moist enough - but rather something with the plastic keys and the heat. I often set my rig up in the garage during the summer (no AC) - and have noticed that after a couple of days of hot days the keys feel like they're coated with a film of grime. (I'm trying to decide if it's just a dusty garage thing or if the heat truly has something to do with it.)

 

Either way....when the keys get that way, I've taken to spraying a little spray furniture polish (i.e. Lemon Pledge) on a rag and giving the keys the once over. I never spray directly on the keys (and therefore don't get spray between the keys) and am careful not to really goop up the rag....just a light application of the polish. The keys feel great afterwards...and haven't shown any indication that they're worse for the wear for having a little bit of furniture polish applied.

The SpaceNorman :freak:
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+1 for lemon pledge. JoeyD turned me on to that trick, although you have to occasionally clean them anyway. You don't want a buildup.

 

I too use pledge... learned it from a local hot shot... who will remain nameless.

Jimmy

 

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Clean the keys with dish washing soap and water, then with just a wet towel. Or use rubbing alcohol. If that doesn't work then use Windex. Then apply the wax and use talcum powder on your hands.

 Find 600 of my jazz piano arrangements and tutorials for educational purposes at patreon.com/HarryLikas Harry was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book."

 

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When my keys get dirty, I use some dishwashing detergent, small amount, on a wet paper towel. I wash all the keys and the chassis of the keyboard with this, then I make 1-2 more passes with just a plain wet paper towel, following this up with dry paper towels. Works great!
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We do a lot of outdoor stuff this time of year... I do the Pledge thing as well (although I prefer Endust). I thoroughly wipe down all of my keyboards with Endust before showtime, then I use baby powder throughout the night to keep my hands dry. That combination works like a charm. In fact, I just got home from a sticky outdoor gig. :)
Reality is like the sun - you can block it out for a time but it ain't goin' away...
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There is definitely something about extreme summer heat (maybe combined with humidty?) that does affect what would otherwise be "normal" feeling key tops. Does anybody know what's really happening from a physical change perspective?

 

 

The SpaceNorman :freak:
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