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Synths History?


dalpozlead

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Ok, I know we all have different tastes for music but the purpose of this topic is for understanding some of the synth history.

 

Im always been a fan of the patches founded in the early 90s euro dance music and was trying to make a compilation of the synths used in those tracks in that decade.

 

Anyone with experience in that field?

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Not sure if the answer to your question is there, but synthmania.com is my favorite place to learn about old synths and the sounds they were known for.

 

It also a page:

http://www.synthmania.com/Famous%20Sounds.htm

that details some recognizable sounds and the synths used to make them.

 

If you ever get your list compiled, I'd be really interested in it. I like reading about synth history.

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Well, you wanna give some examples of specific tracks?

 

To get started... probably the classic early 90's dance synth was the Roland JD-800 and its later relative the JD-990. Later the JV series were used heaps too.

 

"Real" analog synths were still around then, the "What the..." preset off the Juno2 can be heard on the Prodigy's "Charley," that sound is generically called a "Hoover" sound.

 

The good old TX81z "Lately Bass" preset was still used plenty in the 90's, you'll find it on Whigfield's "Saturday Night". (Yeesh!)

 

The piano on the Korg M1 and similar were used plenty on early 90's dance records too.

 

A lot of these sounds didn't really go out of fashion, so you'll probably find at least some of them are standard on many workstations, or expansion cards... or on various VA's. As ever, though, exact replication of sounds on records made with unknown gear, arbitrary programming, layering, and processing is akin to chasing your tail.

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Originally posted by lachesis:

Not sure if the answer to your question is there, but synthmania.com is my favorite place to learn about old synths and the sounds they were known for.

+100 :thu: That site rocks, and I don't understand why the other synth history sites don't have example MP3's of presets.

 

Apart from using different bits of gear, messing around with patches, layering and effects, and listening carefully to records, listening to clips on that site again and again is a great way of differentating between different sounds and getting up to speed on some of the history of synths.

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Hey, great site recommendation!

I was thinking about starting with the top synths for each brand in that time, I thought about the JD too, (which I bought primarily because of Dream Theaters albums)

Ill try to cut some tracks out and upload the thicker sounds in it for you guys to listen

Thanks guys.

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Well, I would hardly call the 90s an era in synth history. Almost everything was done with ROMplers and samplers. ;)

 

Unless, cats had enough money to round up vintage pieces which were being sold cheaply as a result of the boards mentioned above.

 

The site mentioned above is a great resource for true synth history when it comes to researching boards from the past to present.

 

If you are primarily interested in sounds from the 90s, any ROMpler in the music store nowadays has it covered. :)

 

Soundscape doesn't want to accept it having invested in a room full of old stuff. :P:cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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The innovations and inventions which occurred way before 1990 are much more interesting if you truly want to know about the synthesizers history.

 

This site offers an overview of several important inventions that led to many modern musical instruments.

 

Depending on one's point of view, this 1876 musical telegraph (below) could be considered the earliest attempt to create a synthesizer. :)

 

http://www.obsolete.com/120_years/machines/telegraph/HARMON.jpg

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Originally posted by ProfD:

Well, I would hardly call the 90s an era in synth history. Almost everything was done with ROMplers and samplers. ;)

The Kurzweil K2XXX *IS* a 90's synth. ;)

 

There are some characteristic sounds... like that, er, pizzicato sound that was popular on some dance tracks. Later, the supersaw was a very 90's sound.

 

Originally posted by ProfD:

If you are primarily interested in sounds from the 90s, any ROMpler in the music store nowadays has it covered. :)

 

Soundscape doesn't want to accept it having invested in a room full of old stuff. :P:cool:

LOL... lots of old gear isn't needed for reasonable, if not excellent, versions of 90's sounds. 80's sounds are another matter.

 

If you can replicate this brass sound using soft-synths, I'll have a fit.

 

http://www.yousendit.com/transfer.php?action=download&ufid=6EB84D4F198E5081

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