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D flat or G flat ? - Thelonious Monk


delirium

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Thats really funny man!

 

That's from Straight, No Chaser - right right!

 

DUUUUH is D. .

 

GAAAAAAA is G . .

 

You know Monk in his head was goin' Jes! whats up with this guy!

 CP-50, YC 73,  FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, Kurzweil SP6, XK-3, CX-3, Hammond XK-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122

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:D:D

I was already familiar with that footage - it was included in the wonderful movie "Thelonious Monk: Straight No Chaser", which I believe was produced by Clint Eastwood.

Many years ago, I played with someone who had known Monk; he told me that to the uninitiated, Monk gave the impression of being some kind of retarded person. His genius was closed in his private world.

 

In that same movie, Monk's son gives a very honest and touching account on what it was like to grow with such a father. It couldn't have been too bad, anyway - Monk jr. appears to be a very balanced, communicative person. :)

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Marino/Delirium,

 

This is not a Monk anecdote, but Marino, I think you will espically savor it!

 

My teacher had a funny Zoot Sims story. You know Zoot was a sax player that was known for his zaniness and odd sense of humor. He is related to the Tristano/Sal Mosca people. I have noticed recently he worked with Sal Mosca, so maybe this story comes from Sal but don't quote me on that.

 

Zoot was hired in the late 1950's by Mussolini's son who was/is a jazz pianist of some note in Italy as I understand. Zoot arrived by plane for the set of dates and was picked up by Mussolini's son at the airport. Supposedly the young Mussolini was very excited to be working with the famous Zoot and decided to pick him up himself.

 

So in the car the young Mussolini is saying 'Oh Mr. Sims I'm so Glad to see you and I'm very into your work and recordings and I've dreamed about working with you and I have this concept and that for our gigs and let me drive you to your hotel etc etc etc.....' ...basically gushing over Zoot's arrival and presence.

 

Finally the car arrives at the hotel. Through the car ride, Zoot hardly says a word, just listening to the young Mussolini for most of the ride. He exits the car at the curb of the hotel, thanks the young Mussolini for the ride, tells him he will meet him for dinner before that evenings gig and as almost as a second thought, turns around , and says in a dry deadpan tone:

 

'Oh! by the way ....sorry about your Father! ... and walks into the Hotel!

 

There is a lesson here I think!

 

"Less is more - leave more space!"

 

lb

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Italian pianist and bandleader

by Todd S. Jenkins

 

Copyright © 2006 Todd S. Jenkins

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pianist Romano Mussolini, whose formidable jazz talents were often overshadowed by a controversial bloodline, died in Rome on Friday, February 3, 2006. He was 78 years old. Mussolini had recently undergone heart surgery and suffered fatal complications.

It was ironic that Romano, the youngest child of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini and wife Rachele, embraced a decadent form of music that his fathers Fascist cohorts had banned from Italy during World War II. After the execution of Benito Mussolini and his mistress, Claretta Petacci, in 1945, young Romano and his family were exiled to the island of Ischia. He learned to play piano and accordion while recovering from a childhood illness. He first heard jazz music through some albums that his older brothers had bought, and he grew to love the American art form. By the early 1950s he had developed a style similar to George Shearings eloquent approach to the piano, although he later assimilated some of André Previns classically inspired sophistication.

 

In 1956 Mussolini performed at the first San Remo International Jazz Festival, where he garnered much acclaim and offers to tour. He declined all comers, preferring to stay at home with his family and, perhaps, fearing retribution for his fathers actions. He ended up destitute in Rome, working as a carpenter between sporadic musical jobs, many done under an assumed name in the Naples region. He wrote jazz record reviews for several publications as well. But it wasnt long before the jazz world began taking more notice of Mussolini. Among his supporters in the late 1950s were Duke Ellington, Lionel Hampton, Dizzy Gillespie, singer Lillian Terry, Swedish baritonist Lars Gullin, and Chet Baker, who became a close friend and frequent musical associate. Mussolinis first wife, Anna Maria Scicolone, was the sister of actress Sophia Loren and bore him two daughters.

 

In 1956 Mussolinis trio recorded his self-titled debut for RCA. Trumpeter Franco Ambrosetti was an early partner. In 1963 the Romano Mussolini All-Stars recorded Jazz Allo Studio 7 (Ricordi), which earned widespread acclaim. This time he did not hesitate to accept the offers of tour packages, and his name was spread further around Europe. The album was followed by Romano Mussolini All-Stars at the Santa Tecla (Philips) later that year. In the 1980s and 90s Mussolini recorded The Wonderful World of Louis Armstrong (CaBianca Club), the Perfect Alibi soundtrack and Soft and Swing (Carosello), the last title an ideal description of his approach to jazz piano. Mussolinis jobs as a sideman included three albums with multi-instrumentalist Oscar Kleins Jazz Show, work with clarinetist Tony Scott, bassist Jan Jankeje and vibist/pianist Enzo Randisi, and arrangements and conducting for guitarist Daniele Groff.

 

Mussolini was also a respected painter. His memoir, Il Duce, Mio Padre (Kales Press), is a fascinating account of his life in the shadow of one of the 20th centurys most fearsome figures. His father and Petacci receive a wealth of respect in the book, yet Romano Mussolini clearly condemns his fathers anti-Semitic policies and much of the Fascist platform.

 

Romano Mussolini is survived by his second wife, Carla Maria; and three daughters, Alessandra (a deputy in the Italian parliament), Elisabetta and Rachele.

 

(Many thanks to John Pickford for his assistance in compiling this article

 CP-50, YC 73,  FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, Kurzweil SP6, XK-3, CX-3, Hammond XK-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122

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http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2006/03/17/obit18306_wideweb__470x361,0.jpg

 

http://images.google.com/images?q=tbn:B9LwFKGfTmAbOM:http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41290000/jpg/_41290566_1romanoap203c.jpg

 

http://images.google.com/images?q=tbn:ZTtOCG1r9YCw2M:http://idata.over-blog.com/0/05/09/06/muss2-1.jpg

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Hi Legatoboy - that account on Romano Mussolini's life is rather accurate. Personally, I was never drawn to his kind of jazz, which was rather conventional. I think that to became a jazz musician was for him a way to escape the huge heaviness of his legacy. Remarkably, he was always able to keep himself far away from any political involvement or speculation.
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Marino,

 

I thought his life was an interesting adaptation coming from such an overwhelming bad family situation. Only in Italy! It was in alot of ways, a wonderful thing.

 

The power of music to change lives!

 

Cool,

lb

 CP-50, YC 73,  FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, Kurzweil SP6, XK-3, CX-3, Hammond XK-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122

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I was just reading up on Monk on Wikipedia and I saw this quote which made me laugh.

 

It is said that he would rarely speak to anyone other than his beloved wife Nellie, and certainly in later years it was reported that he would go through an entire tour without speaking to the other members of his group. Bassist Al McKibbon, who had known Monk for twenty years and played on his final tour in 1971, later said "On that tour Monk said about two words. I mean literally maybe two words. He didn't say 'Good morning', 'Goodnight', 'What time?' Nothing. Why, I don't know. He sent word back after the tour was over that the reason he couldn't communicate or play was that Art Blakey and I were so ugly."
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Kayvon,

 

You know Monk and Bud Powell were great friends and used to hang out. Bud being SUCH a player and Monk being a great player also but more compositional fostered the great jazz piano debate which still goes on.

 

Bud I heard could get very weird also. Take off and get lost in the subway on a way to a gig.

Also be cruel to his pick up bass players and drummers for a 1 night gig! I have heard a possible reason for this that I have promised to never divulge.

 

As I understand it Monk and Bud would hang out in the same room for a day and read, play, & relax and never say a much to each other!

lb

 CP-50, YC 73,  FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, Kurzweil SP6, XK-3, CX-3, Hammond XK-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122

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Kayvon,

 

You know Monk and Bud Powell were great friends and used to hang out. Bud being SUCH a player and Monk being a great player also but more compositional fostered the great jazz piano debate which still goes on.

 

Bud I heard could get very weird also. Take off and get lost in the subway on a way to a gig.

Also be cruel to his pick up bass players and drummers for a 1 night gig! I have heard a possible reason for this that I have promised to never divulge.

 

As I understand it Monk and Bud would hang out in the same room for a day and read, play, & relax and never say much to each other!

lb

 CP-50, YC 73,  FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, Kurzweil SP6, XK-3, CX-3, Hammond XK-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122

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Delirium,

 

I think you also have to be intelligent enough to know when to shut your intelligence off and just get into the feeling of the moment. Sometimes thats the hardest thing to learn how to do! To turn our brains off and have something else come through.

 

The hardest thing I've had to do after using my brian to figure out the theory (I'm am by no means a mavin at theory) and play correctly was to find the big switch in my head to turn my brain off! The switch was in a back room in my brain I had forgotten completly about.

 

I've found out it can be alot of fun. Kinda like being a kid again but in much more adult way if that makes any sense.!

lb :wave:

 CP-50, YC 73,  FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, Kurzweil SP6, XK-3, CX-3, Hammond XK-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122

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Originally posted by Legatoboy:

Delirium,

I think you also have to be intelligent enough to know when to shut your intelligence off and just get into the feeling of the moment. Sometimes thats the hardest thing to learn how to do! To turn our brains off and have something else come through.

exactly, but as you said - it does still requires some intelligence :D
♫♫♫ motif XS6, RD700GX
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Originally posted by Legatoboy:

Kayvon,

 

You know Monk and Bud Powell were great friends and used to hang out. Bud being SUCH a player and Monk being a great player also but more compositional fostered the great jazz piano debate which still goes on.

 

Bud I heard could get very weird also. Take off and get lost in the subway on a way to a gig.

Also be cruel to his pick up bass players and drummers for a 1 night gig! I have heard a possible reason for this that I have promised to never divulge.

 

As I understand it Monk and Bud would hang out in the same room for a day and read, play, & relax and never say a much to each other!

lb

I saw Bud Powell on one of his last gigs before he passed away, at Birdland in Manhattan. He had just returned from Europe and his agent got him the Birdland gig with a drummer and bass player that the agent found for him. Bud was the only one out of the three of them that could play that night, the bass player being the weakest link. Finally after one of the tunes , Bud just sat there at the piano and stared at the keys for about 2 minutes without saying a word. The bass player and drummer kept looking at Bud trying to figure out what he was going to do next, and the audience got realy quiet. Finally Bud looks at the bass player and says to him, "How about if we play something you know this time"....The bass player looked like he had just been punched in the stomach and started shuffling his feet and wiping the sweat off his brow, and Bud continued with " I am serious, you pick the next tune, but you better know it".....

 

After about 5 minutes of this, the bass player suggested that they play a "blues"... That was the last tune of the set........

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Bobsk8,

 

I think in this case it sounds like the guy wasn't a accomplised jazz bass player and Bud was justifiably pissed-off! I don't know about stopping the set though, guess he had to!

lb

 CP-50, YC 73,  FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, Kurzweil SP6, XK-3, CX-3, Hammond XK-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122

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Bobsk8,

 

I think in this case it sounds like the guy wasn't a accomplised jazz bass player and Bud was justifiably pissed-off! I don't know about stopping the set though, guess he had to!

lb

 CP-50, YC 73,  FP-80, PX5-S, NE-5d61, Kurzweil SP6, XK-3, CX-3, Hammond XK-3, Yamaha YUX Upright, '66 B3/Leslie 145/122

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