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Green Eyed Lady?


Nu2Keys

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I want to learn to play Green Eyed Lady but I don't read music. Any recommendations (read: shortcuts) on how to learn it? I know this is probably a tired old song to most of you guys, but I have always loved the organ sound on it, and the whole song as well.
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There are quite a few free MIDI files of varying qualities circulating on the net for Green Eyed Lady. You might try loading one into a sequencer program (e.g. Sonar) and learning the parts from there. Or if you'd rather do it the time-honored "learn it by ear off the recording" way, you'd be greatly assisted by one or other of the programs available now that will slow down the recording. The same sequencer program can probably do it, or you could buy something like Slow Gold just for this purpose.

 

Larry.

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The head from that tune is the easy part. But I think it takes a 2-manual organ (left hand part on top manual), or else a careful keyboard spit to do it right. There has to be percussion in the left hand part, while you ride the right hand chords (legato).

 

I've always liked the sound of the left hand part layering a hot B3 sound with a good strong piano. Definitely not the original, but it rocks. Try it sometime!

 

It is a way cool tune. Yes, it was overplayed back when I was 12, but by now I think it safe to go back in the water with this one. I'd play it myself, if it weren't for the rather demanding middle part.

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Originally posted by Dave Bryce:

The main lick is:

 

E D G D A A# B

E C# G D A A# B

E C G D A A# B

E A# B E G# A F# G F# G

 

Hope that helps...

 

dB

Actually, I thought the chromatically descending note (D, then C#, then C) was repeated on the way down as well:

 

Originally posted by Nu2Keys:I want to learn to play Green Eyed Lady but I don't read music. Any recommendations (read: shortcuts) on how to learn it?
I'm curious, and no disrespect, but how have you learned any tunes prior to this? :confused: (and if you're picking GEL as your first, you're a braver man than I, Gunga Din. ;)

 

Cheers,

SG

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"I'm curious, and no disrespect, but how have you learned any tunes prior to this? (and if you're picking GEL as your first, you're a braver man than I, Gunga Din."

 

No disrespect taken! Actually, I have been in bands forever playing guitar and/or bass but I have been playing keyboard in a blues band for a year now. GEL is a just a favorite of mine and I've NEVER played the song before in any band. Aim high, right? And I'm not even thinking about the solo!

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Good for you nu2keys. :thu:

 

Dooooood, if you've been playing bass forever, then you should be able to pick apart the bass line, right?

 

OK, then do it, and chart it. Write the bass notes, or spell them out, within measures. Be sure to designate INTRO, VERSE, BRIDGE, whatever...

 

Put the lyrics in over the measures.

 

Do your best to figure out the chords from your bass line.

 

Come back later and we'll help you with the solo.

 

No problem.

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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That's what I was expecting Nu to answer, actually... so we could show him how to fish (errr, transcribe) a tune for himself.

 

Something about teaching a man to shear a sheep, or some such thing. ;):P

 

As for "no problem" with the solo, I'll leave that to you, Tom... could you show me? ;)

 

:wave:

 

Cheers,

SG

(off to rehearsal, doing "Frankenstein" by Mr. Winter... time to fight with the guitar players that want to cover all the synth lines... the bastages... :mad: )

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"That's what I was expecting Nu to answer, actually... so we could show him how to fish (errr, transcribe) a tune for himself."

 

I'm not sure what that means. Actually, I don't have access to the CD and I'm trying to get the chords from memory.

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Originally posted by Sven Golly:

Actually, I thought the chromatically descending note (D, then C#, then C) was repeated on the way down as well:

You're totally right...duh... :o

 

...that's what I get for cutting and pasting the end of the top line instead of just typing each line... ;)

 

dB

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Originally posted by Nu2Keys:

"That's what I was expecting Nu to answer, actually... so we could show him how to fish (errr, transcribe) a tune for himself."

 

I'm not sure what that means. Actually, I don't have access to the CD and I'm trying to get the chords from memory.

Basically, I was looking for a way to help you develop a methodology for approaching new songs you wanted to learn... a "shortcut" as you termed it in the beginning.

 

However... without a copy of the tune to listen to, and without being able to read notation, aren't you being just a wee bit unrealistic? Music is conveyed in only two fashions (effectively): by transcribing it (as sheet music) or by performing it. Without access to the latter, and being unable to comprehend the former... ummm.... errr.... :freak:

 

So, hey, apparently hockey is back! :thu:

 

Cheers,

SG

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Originally posted by Dave Bryce:

Originally posted by Sven Golly:

Actually, I thought the chromatically descending note (D, then C#, then C) was repeated on the way down as well:

You're totally right...duh... :o

 

...that's what I get for cutting and pasting the end of the top line instead of just typing each line... ;)

 

dB

Whew... I thought I was losing my mind for a minute there. I tend to take everything you post as gospel (positive experience has taught me that much), but this caught my eye. ;)

 

Simple enough typo to make, though... :D

 

Cheers,

SG

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Originally posted by Sven Golly:

Actually, I thought the chromatically descending note (D, then C#, then C) was repeated on the way down as well:

 

 

E  D  G  D  A A# B
E  C#  G  _C#_  A A# B 
E  C  G  _C_  A A# B
E A# B E G# A  F# G F# G

that's how I used to play the tune, but perhaps that's my own 'version'? ;)

 

 

Cheers,

SG

Most excellent! :thu:

 

And the chords over the lyrics in the verse are simply:

 

| Em7 | A | Am | Em |

 

repeat

 

So nu2keys, you've got everything you need to get started. Google the lyrics, print 'em out and start shearing.

 

Tom

 

PS Oh, and Sven... I didn't mean to imply that *I* would be transcribing the solo parts. I figure that one of the good folks here (SG) who is familiar with the song (SG), plays out professionally doing tunes like this (SG) and knows how to read (SG) and write (SG) music could make this happen. ;) Thanks!

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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"However... without a copy of the tune to listen to, and without being able to read notation, aren't you being just a wee bit unrealistic? Music is conveyed in only two fashions (effectively): by transcribing it (as sheet music) or by performing it. Without access to the latter, and being unable to comprehend the former... ummm.... errr...."

 

Yeah, is IS tough trying to learn a song from (MY) memory, especially a song this old. I was trying to play it in Gm! You guys have been very helpful. Thanks!

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Originally posted by Nu2Keys:

I want to learn to play Green Eyed Lady but I don't read music. Any recommendations (read: shortcuts) on how to learn it? I know this is probably a tired old song to most of you guys, but I have always loved the organ sound on it, and the whole song as well.

tired old song-not to me. That song is a classic, one of the few that keeps me from igonring classic rock altogether.

 

Wait a minute-this is the keyboard forum? uh...hey, nice to meet everyone.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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dB - I challenge you to notate the demented B3 note bends at the end of the tune using only text like you did above. :D

 

Kirk

Reality is like the sun - you can block it out for a time but it ain't goin' away...
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Just guessing, but I'd say bottom 3 or 4 all out, rest in (basic blues preset) or something similar to that. Loud percussion, 3rd harmonic, medium decay (or maybe fast). Probably no vibrato/chorus.

 

BTW, for the chords I play G, A, and C triads, sliding up the keyboard, and all using what I think is called 2nd inversion (i.e., DGB for the G chord). And then back to G or Em. That matches what you said, Tom, just a clue on the voicing.

 

The trick is kicking in the leslie at the right time while sliding up that triad, and (as I said above) playing the left hand part on top manual with percussion and right hand part on bottom manual, without percussion. If you play both parts on the same manual (and if you're playing a realistic clone), the legato right hand chords kill the percussion on the bass.

 

And that's about all there is to it, except the hard parts! ;)

 

BTW, I just fired up NIB4 and I don't see a GEL preset. Maybe it's there with some clever pun and I missed it.

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Something tells me that we all went home last night and pulled out the recording of Green-Eyed Lady.

 

I know I did. :freak:

 

I think that was a one-hit-wonder for Sugarloaf. Am I right?

"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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Originally posted by DafDuc:

Nope - "Don't Call Us (We'll Call You)" - kind of pop music's converse to "Have a Cigar".

Right... Two-Hit Wonder. :rolleyes:
"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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Originally posted by DafDuc:

Nope - "Don't Call Us (We'll Call You)" - kind of pop music's converse to "Have a Cigar".

Ahh, the tune with the "I Feel Fine" riff - I remember that one...
Reality is like the sun - you can block it out for a time but it ain't goin' away...
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This is one of the few songs wherein I prefer the radio single edit.

 

The full-length version sinply had too much repetition of themes/licks, but the "45" radio edit had a great flow to it.

 

I don't recall if the 45 had edited the organ solo, though. I think it may have from 32 to 16 bars, perhaps.

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Originally posted by burningbusch:

Did this song, the 45 version, ever make it to CD? I checked Real Rhapsody and iTunes for Sugarloaf but didn't find anything.

 

Busch.

Ummmmmmmm... try searching for Jerry Corbetta - the keyboard player.
"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent." - Victor Hugo
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