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Battery


lukebass

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Hey!

I never experienced my battery dying while playing. I change it about every 2 months. I just wanna know what the signs are. Does your bass stop playing right away? does it make popping noices? does it get more and more quiet Reason I wanna know is it's a pain changing batteries since I have to take out like 10 screws and since I play live often if I see the signs during the first tune I play will I be able to finish the show or should make sure I have a screw driver handy. How long do batteries last anyway? I play a ZON sonus if that makes any difference. Thanks!

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Your bass will sound weak and distorted when your battery starts dying.

 

Keep your bass unplugged when you are not using it.

 

Buy a battery tester with a meter; they are only a couple of bucks and worth the price.

 

Test batteries on things like smoke alarms and basses and flashlights on a periodic basis that has some sort of meaning (like whenever you pay the rent/mortgage, etc). Taking out 10 screws is a pain, but so is going dead on stage.

 

However, your battery should last at least 6 months of normal use.

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Even with heavy use (I rotate basses a lot) all the preamp units I've ever use last at least 6 months, generally around 500-1,000 hours. My guess is you have a short in your Zon that's causing premature battery drain. You might want to test the inside jack leads with nothing plugged in to see if you're still getting a voltage flow. I would ask Zon or a local tech to recommend a testing procedure.

 

Actually I do have a problem when I leave a battery inside an AEB, it seems to drain much sooner, like a month. Haven't had the time to check that out as I usually just pop them out when I don't use them.

 

I'm surprised Zon doesn't use easy-access battery compartments, a lot of other companies have switched to them. And TEN screws? That's like removing a P-bass pickguard. It's something I'd write to Zon about.

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I always think I've blown a speaker when the battery starts to get low. Usually the lower couple of notes on the E string will start distorting first.

You can stop now -jeremyc

STOP QUOTING EVERY THING I SAY!!! -Bass_god_offspring

lug, you should add that statement to you signature.-Tenstrum

I'm not sure any argument can top lug's. - Sweet Willie

 

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I would say 6 months too. The symptoms of low battery power can be fairly weird and unpredictable, sometimes I get a low level distortion (which is kind of a nice sound) and sometimes I get volume drops with certain strings. Once I looked very foolish as I insisted there was a problem with my bridge pick up and played only with neck pick up, to realise later it was just a battery. I did once run out a battery in one month but I was playing many hours per day and I figure I must have left it plugged in at one stage. Other times the battery's lasted a year! I guess 6 months is what I'd go for.

A battery tester!

Good tip, why didn't I think of that, mind you I also have the problem of removing countless screws.

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Originally posted by Fred the bass player:

My guess is you have a short in your Zon that's causing premature battery drain. You might want to test the inside jack leads with nothing plugged in to see if you're still getting a voltage flow. I would ask Zon or a local tech to recommend a testing procedure.

I don't think lukebass said his battery was dying every two months, just that he changes the battery every two months, and wondered what the signs of a dying battery actually were.

 

So, most likely lukebass is changing batteries prematurely ;)

 

Having said that - I'm afraid I can't offer any advice to the original question sorry - all my basses thus far have been passive.

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I don't gig too often, so I usually use a gig to get me to change the battery. I'll go at least 6 months.

 

As one luke said, 2 months is probably too soon. I rotate my batteries into my tuner, and always have a new one on hand just in case. It paid off recently as my guitarist's wah pedal went dead, and I had a nice fresh battery for him.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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I've had my Ibanez BTB400 for well over a year now (closer to a year and 1/2) and I have not yet had to change a battery. It has an 18V power supply but I play it quite a bit. I'll have to remember to grab my battery tester next time I stop by my parents' house to see how the batteries are holding up.
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10 screws ... idiot designers!

 

You're actually better off removing the battery when not in use, but 10 frickin' screws everytime? What a pain!

 

I thought it was bad with my Ovation; I have to press a release button and then slide the preamp out. I'll never complain about that again!

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  • 5 weeks later...

Your bass developes a distortion and eventually you get no sound. How fast you go from distortion to dead...I can't say because my batteries have never gotten to that point. The batteries in my fender jazz 5 have been working for the past 3 years! I play about 2 hours a nite 3-4 nites (practice & rehearsal)a week plus a regular sunday gig which adds another 2 hours of playing time. When I hit "distortion" I'll let you all know!

 

A friend of mine goes through batterries about once evry 2 months. He doesn't play anymore than I do...He has an electrical problem with his bass I think.

The Good Stuff is On The Bottom!
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yeah...i've always wondered why they don't make batteries easier to change.

 

EVERYONE is paranoid about batterires dying on a gig. Why don't manufacturers address this for every bass.

 

It isn't as though it is an expensive thing to add on.

 

jason "i hate buying strings for my 7" atkins

2cor5:21

Soli Deo Gloria

 

"it's the beauty of a community. it takes a village to raise a[n] [LLroomtempJ]." -robb

 

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I have an 18V system, and by the sounds of things I change em out a little early as well. I figured since we play nearly every weekend, 2 nights a week, and this thing is "on" from 9pm till 1am every night, and I pick it up occasionally during the week....a couple months is about all I dare trust 'em.. I go to the local Lowe's and get one of those "contractor packs" of 9V batteries.. 8 of em for less than $10.. always in the gig bag... And besides other bandmates have wirelesses, and every once in a while...
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I recently acquired a Bromberg B2 which has an 18V system. Fantastic guitar apart from one thing.

 

I don't know if Dean are just plain nuts or have extraordinary faith in the longevity of the preamp's battery, because it's been fastened in place inside the body of the guitar with thick double sided tape! Its rock solid and will be difficult to remove when I have to replace it. I don't know if this is supposed to suggest that it doesn't require changing that often.

 

What's even more weird is that there is another separate and far more readily accessible battery in a compartment on the back of the guitar for the piezo pickups. It this one supposed to have a shorter life? Who knows.

 

Any ideas?

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I agree w/ the 6 months sentiment.

 

I actually tape a small piece of paper to the battery when I change it that has the date of the change. This system has proved very handy in conjunction w/ a battery tester.

 

Peace.

--SW

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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I have a Modulus Quantum 5 and change batteries once per year just to be on the safe side. I do at least one gig a week plus practice. The one thing I do is disconnect the cord from my bass at each break and anytime that I won't be playing it. I use Energizers just because that is what my bass and wireless seem to like best! I have had other active basses in the past and this practice worked with them also!

 

Have a Great Day!!

 

harleyboy

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