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Urgent-ish: Plastering job question


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A friend gave me notice that he could get me a job doing grunt work for plastering by Monday. He's been working 2 years, trains people. Start out at $8.50, and pay goes up. You get health insurance too - plus he said the boss is a personal guy with his workers and takes everyone out to eat $$$ every other month.

 

Now, I'm not very muscular, but I can lift like 50, 75 pounds. Does giving a 135 pound girl a piggy back ride count? :P

 

My question is, what's involved? He said that you'd be carrying buckets of plaster and some plywood sheets and stuff like that, and handing it to the plasterers. It's 8 or 9 hour day, Monday - Friday, get up be at work at 7am. I'm not a days person, but hey - it's a job. And you get payed every Friday. I'm really considering this because I found 5 or 6 jobs to get applications for, and here is an opportunity. He said they give you a 1 day test to see if you can do the job, but pretty much there's no application involved.

 

So I'd appreciate some enlightenment, I want to get back to him with my thoughts in a day or 2. Thanks!

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Getting plastered sounds like a great way to earn bucks!

 

Seriously...give it a try. If you need to watch some training videos, I think there are some available on www.threestooges.com.

 

Seriously...drywall and plastering is probably not a bad trade to get into. Start out as unskilled labor, learn while you earn. Sure, you'll have to do a little bit of physical labor, but, you're up to it.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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I am assuming it is actual plaster work, not drywall.

 

Plastering is kind of a skilled trade/lost art. I think it is hard work, and is something you coudl always make some supplemental cash at if needed once learned.

 

I say, if you can use the bread, the boss is cool and you can hack the physical nature, do it. If nothing else, it will hook you up kharmatically.

 

If it is drywall, btw, I'd still do it. You'lll need it if you ever plan on owning a house.

 

Phait, how far are you from S.E. Michigan? I am thinking we could have fun hanging out, you being a video game/music guy like me. With the way things are on the home front right now, I could use a brain pruging weekend trip.

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No doubt about it. It's hard work.

Like Dean said you can earn as you learn.

The trades are a great way to make a living but it's

Physicaly demanding.

You will come home assed out and dead tired for sure.

 

Word of advice. If you want to keep this gig,

Keep yourself busy on the job site, or at least look busy.

There is definitley room to grow.

Get some rest, you'll need it.

Good luck

 

;)

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Phait, it's bloody hard work and you get filthy - the plaster dust gets everywhere. One of my younger brothers did it for a few years - the money wasn't too bad, but he hated it and his hair suffered (caked-in plaster!). The general contractors were always trying to keep from paying the full amount for every job too. If you do it, make sure you get a "contract" in writing, with late payment penalties.

 

If it were me, I'd steer towards electrical, plumbing or framing work if I had to work in construction at all.

 

Good luck,

:DTR

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Originally posted by Dave the Rave:

Phait, it's bloody hard work and you get filthy - the plaster dust gets everywhere. One of my younger brothers did it for a few years - the money wasn't too bad, but he hated it and his hair suffered (caked-in plaster!). The general contractors were always trying to keep from paying the full amount for every job too. If you do it, make sure you get a "contract" in writing, with late payment penalties.

 

If it were me, I'd steer towards electrical, plumbing or framing work if I had to work in construction at all.

 

Good luck,

:DTR

Are you referring to actual plastering, or just the grunt work of grabbing things for people?
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Last year, I had my masters bathroom done, had a guy come in to do the tiling and I went to Home Depot to gather all the materials. I picked up 5 sheets of drywall and 8 sheets of wonderboard. Loaded it in my truck by myself!!! Almost broke my back doing it!

Phait, sounds like hard work man. But it's an honest job...

My advice to you if you do try it out, always, always remember to watch your back! Wear a good protective back support or brace. Also wear a mask, all that dust from the drywall or plaster may do harm to your lungs.

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If you actually take the time to learn the skill, you'll always be able to make a little side money. An ad in the local Green Sheet or Penny Saver will get you a flood of phone calls from local home owners who either don't know how or don't want to do the jobs themselves.

 

Plasterers also usually can do drywall work. I recenly plaid a guy $200 to mud and tape my 9x14 kitchen. I had hung all the board. So he comes in for a couple of hours on the first day, less than an hour on the second day, and a few minutes on the third day.

 

Imagine, you decide that you need a grand for a new toy. So you take three or four small jobs on one weekend. run from place to place, putting in a couple of hours here and a couple of hours there. In 2 or 3 days you've got your grand. Don't want to work? Don't accept any work.

 

For an ambitous guy who needs a few bucks and is not afraid of work, it is a good skill because it is always marketable.

 

Bill

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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If you don't have anything pressing going on, I suggest you do it just for the experience.

 

Working as a contractor is good experience for home ownership in years to come. You'll be more handy around the house and will be better able to work with the contractors you hire.

 

Also, unlike a myriad of "white collar jobs", drywall/plaster IS honest work and most people respect that.

"You never can vouch for your own consciousness." - Norman Mailer
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Well, the 1 test day is my incentive right now - I just know what I'm better suited at, and it's not hard labor. But if it's not that bad, I should be able to handle it. I'll find out. I just know I do not want to work with computers (like EVERYONE around me is suggesting just because I know them so well) because I do that enough at home - thus I need a semi-active, at the least, job. Thanks for all the replies!
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I don't know about plaster, but if drywall is involved, I'd run screaming in the oppisite direction. I've just done it for myself and it's nasty miserable work.

 

The least amount of work for the most pay is electrician for sure. And hey, wiring comes naturally to many musicians who have hooked up PAs and such.

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Originally posted by Phait:

I just know what I'm better suited at, and it's not hard labor.

 

...........

 

I just know I do not want to work with computers (like EVERYONE around me is suggesting just because I know them so well) because I do that enough at home - thus I need a semi-active, at the least, job.

Well...doing it at home and not making any real money off of it...makes it a hobby, not a job.

 

Thing is...would you rather get $8.50/hour doing hard(er) labor...

...or 3 times that doing work you already know.?

 

My day gig is all computer related...IT/web, graphics, multimedia & AV projects.

Yeah...it burns me out a bit sometimes...so that when I get into my studio, I'm all "computer-ed-out"...which is why I'm still ensconced in the analog/outboard world...and I only use my DAW as a necessary evil...

.I just get tired of mousing around and staring at computer screens.

 

But...I do my day gig because I know it well...I do it well...and I get paid for it very well too...

...and that allows me to keep a constant supply of new toys flowing into my studio!!!

And...apart from the occasional burn-out days...the fact that my day gig and my studio gig have a LOT of overlapping technology and they both also allow me to express myself creatively...well, it keeps the juices flowing 24/7.

 

I don't know...if I had to choose between plastering walls for $8.50/hr or working with computers for that same $8.50...

...well, that would be a no-brainer...

...although, you can probably get a lot more than $8.50 doing IT/web kinda' stuff if you are really good & experienced at itand responsible enough to do it 9-to-5not just as a home hobby.

 

Oh...and if you need some activity...get a treadmill...ride a bike...go for a walk...

(I need to get off of my ass too...been waiting for some cooler weather.) :D

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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Heh.. well I considered networking years ago but I figured I was too stupid for it. I still don't know anything about it. People hiring for webdesign want people who know a little more than I do.

 

What I meant by a semi-active/active job isn't to make up for lack of activity - I have a mountain bike, I do ride it. I just think if I have a job where I'm not sitting on my ass, it will keep me busy during the hours, it will be more honest work, and if it's beneficial to a household or the community, helping someone or people (like building houses) - I'd have pride at the end of the day.

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I agree about the "honest Work" stuff. Guys in the construction trades often seem very calm and centered. They can actually SEE the results of their work, and so can everyone else. As a computer worker (like me) you don't get that.

 

I say give it a try. There's been a lot of good advice given here, to which I can only add this: If you can get experience in construction - plastering, in this case, but it could be any other part of construction - you can network around and eventually try other construction jobs. I know a guy who did pretty well with framing, so he went to school and is about to get his degree in architecture. He loves it! If you can make this one step I know you will make others, and who knows where you can go.

 

-ml

Rubber Lizard Studio
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It is easy to get sidetracked...so choose your direction wisely.

 

Hey...theres nothing wrong with construction/plastering...

...a lot of people make a good living doing it.

But...is THAT what you want to do with your life?

 

What I am saying is...if your heart/mind/talent is puling you in one direction...

...then why the hell would you want to take a detour?

Once you make a turn...it's not always easy to come back to what you were...or where you REALLY wanted to go.

 

If you have talents...refine/use them first before you start in another direction, from "square-one".

 

Don't get me wrong...I've changed my direction a few times in my life too...but...overall, I never strayed too far from where my heart/mind/talent was.

I'm just saying that if you distract yourself too much...you can lose that, and never find it again.

 

Otherwise...if you wanna' go do a little plastering for a couple of months just to "get back on your feet"...that's fine...we've all done the odd job or two.

But if you treat it like a serious job...a lifestyle...a career...

...then it WILL become just that.

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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I say go for it, Phait! It's not like you're stuck doing it for the rest of your life or something, if you don't enjoy it. You can always go do something else, meanwhile you'll have learned a really valuable skill that will probably help you later on. Also, I'm guessing you'll be one of the smartest guys on the crew, so use that as an opportunity to hang around, observe and learn more, with an eye toward picking up more skills (and possibly better paying/more enjoyable ones). I think the more facets of home construction and repair you know, the better - it'll save you a ton of money if and when you own your own home, and it's the type of work where there's always jobs even if the economy sucks. Plus, like you said, it's an honest job where you can be proud of your work. Very cool.

 

I did a lot of different crazy jobs when I was younger - volunteer work too - and I'm really glad!

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