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10 scales from around the world.


surfergirl
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Thanks for posting this, I think it's important to understand the different musics of the world. 

At the same time, we cannot and must not ignore that not all of these scales can be successfully translated into the 12 note tempered scale that European keyboardists created so they could play slightly out of tune in all keys. That is the same system that has been put on modern guitars but we have an opportunity - we can stretch strings to any pitch we want. That is super cool. 

Our own American Blues music uses notes that are not quite tempered, it's part of the sound of authentic blues singing and bottleneck guitar styles. 

Many of us hear it and understand it. Billie Holiday did not sing flat, her endings are very intentional and repeated accurately over and over, it's part of who she was as a musician. 

I had a long-necked Turkish Baglama Saz that had 16 frets per octave, the Oud has no frets and neither does the Indian Sarod. The Sitar does have frets, they are tied on and are intentionally movable. There's lots more for those who seek and enjoy!!!! 😃

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It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
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Hey, cool! I got that, among other things, in an email earlier today, myself!

Having the suggested chords and arpeggios built from the given scale-tones is great! For me, that's possibly the best part! The video including notation, tablature, and 'follow the guide-line' moving with the audio of the examples being played is excellent! I really like this, and will wind up down the rabbit hole with it for a while, I'm sure... coming out the other end eventually with improved chops and musicality!

Anyone who likes this, would also LOVE a book called The Advancing Guitarist by the great Mick Goodrick. Also Chris Jeurgensen's The Infinite Guitar. And Winston will agree with me on the excellent music theory and guitar playing lessons sections of Ralph Denyer's The Guitar Handbook.

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Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I recommend The Guitar Handbook to any friend starting out on Guitar. IMHO, it may be the best all-around introduction to the Guitar of any book I've seen in the past 30 years or so.

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"Monsters are real, and Ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win." Stephen King

 

http://www.novparolo.com

 

https://thewinstonpsmithproject.bandcamp.com

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Thanks for posting the article SG! 👍 Scales have always been a big part of my study and practice for leadwork improvisation.  I'm not playing much leadwork these days but I still like to run through my Pentatonic blues scales in major and minor and relate them to the full major and minor scales in 5 modes every time I pick up the guitar.  There is always more to learn! I do need to work more on the chord melody concept and arpeggios.  When singing and playing solo, you have to keep the chords going when the lead parts come up.  😎

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Take care, Larryz
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I dabbled in "other" scales back in the day using different modes, diminished, chromatic scales, but mostly I use the Major and minor scales, and mostly pentatonic major and minors. I do dabble in the Dorian Mode a bit on one or two songs but I have limited myself on purpose to using the scales that need the least amount of theoretical thought in the moment for improv. I don't want to study all kinds of arpeggios, and things that happen in Jazz a bunch. Simple stuff that only requires knowing which key I am playing in is my favorite. I was taught a bunch of stuff by my guitar teachers which I still use some of. But basically I am a pentatonic player with a few full scale notes thrown in here & and there. If I play clean and melodically in what I do I am a happy picker.

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