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Switching Camps (?)


Anson

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Ok, so it's time for a new Stage Piano.

I've been a Roland user, upgrading each model from RD250-700, and am considering switching to Yamaha for my next board.

I currently use the RD700 and am considering the RD700GX and the S90ES.

I'm considering the switch mainly for a change of sonic scenery. I'm sure I can adjust to a different keybed easily enough.

Assuming I like a large enough percentage of the Yamaha sounds as well or better than the Roland, I would be concerned with losing the comfort zone I enjoy in creating sounds and set-ups with the Roland.

Any and all advice/comments from those who have switched camps (y>r or r>y) would be greatly appreciated.

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Well one thing's for sure, the sound engine on the S90es is much more elaborate and allows for much more indepth editing than the RD. The RD is a stage piano with excellent piano and rhodes sounds, and a decent compliment of gig ready sounds covering strings, pads, organs, basic synths etc.

 

The S90es however is full fledged synthesizer. In fact it is the same engine as the Motif ES + a great new piano sample (well new when it came out).

Ian Benhamou

Keyboards/Guitar/Vocals

 

[url:https://www.facebook.com/OfficialTheMusicalBox/]The Musical Box[/url]

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I've had a Yammie S80 and am now using an S90. I love the action and sounds but have to agree on user friendliness. I also use a Korg 61 from time to time and find that much easier to program and tweak. With the Yamaha I've not been able to do much programming or even tweaking on the fly. Usually I need to take the time to get all of that done let's say as "homework". Recently I've been considering the possibility of replacing (or supplementing) the S90 with a Korg M50. Any users out there with some advice on that?

 

 

Stan

Gig Rig: Yamaha S90 XS; Hammond SK-1; Rehearsal: Yamaha MOX8 Korg Triton Le61, Yamaha S90, Hammond XK-1

Retired: Hammond M2/Leslie 145, Wurly 200, Ensoniq VFX

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I'm in complete agreement with Joe P above. I use both Roland and Yamaha - and love both brands. But when it comes to which is easier to navigate and set up, there's no contest.

 

If you already know the Roland scheme of things, be prepared for a huge learning curve getting onboard with Yamaha.

 

But I also need to say that I like Yamaha's digital versions of acoustic pianos better than Roland's as a group, and the S90ES has a great one.

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I'm in total agreement with Roland's user friendliness. They are by far, imo, the most intuitive keyboards to use.

 

However, I'll repeat my original post, the RD series and the S series are not really comparable. One is quality stage piano with excellent bread and butter sounds and simple UI for quick but not very deep editing.

 

The other is a fully-fledged synthesizer where you could do in depth, layer by layer editing, access to lfo's, filter settings, etc. etc.

Ian Benhamou

Keyboards/Guitar/Vocals

 

[url:https://www.facebook.com/OfficialTheMusicalBox/]The Musical Box[/url]

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Ian is absolutely correct; a more reasonable comparison is the S90es and FantomX. Im a longtime Roland user, and Ill agree, even in synthland, Roland is a bit more user-friendly. But unless you do a lot of tweaking, youre basically focusing on stock sounds, and you will be very very happy with S90es. Excellent pianos, Rhodes, Wurlies (in my opinion, much more realistic and enjoyable than Rolands synths, or RD pianos versions), Clavinets (kind of a toss-up on these). So if youre just looking for those bread and butters, and want some great other sounds, youll be loving the S90es (get a deal on it, theyre discontinued and stores want to liquidate their stock!).

If on the other hand you do a LOT of tweaking on those bread and butters, I would consider the Nord Stage; Its the most tweak-friendly keyboard axe out there, but your love of the pianos will be decided once you play them. You either love them or hate them. Everyone loves the Rhodes, and Wurlis (the best out there in hardwarethough I havent played the CP1), the clavs are very good (I prefer those on the Electro 2), and the synth section will provide lots of fun once you get in there (more useful than youll think at first) and is very ballsy sounding. Great organs are the bonus. So if you love the piano, youll love this instrument, otherwise, keep moving!

 

Hitting "Play" does NOT constitute live performance. -Me.
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I also have been playing Rolands since the 80s, have the RD700 and GASing to get a new Stage Piano. Ive been mostly playing stuff requiring standard key sounds, but this winter I was spending a lot of time trying to find sounds to fit and tweaking Rompler synth sounds by using effects and attack/decay parameters. So I have been thinking about just getting a Motif/ES/XS rack and keeping the RD for a while longer. The RD is getting old, but it still works and it is very easy to program those SETUPS. Adding a rack will be like getting a new board. Just a thought.

 

Although it sounds like it is a Rompler I would check out the CP5. It is scheduled to be out in about a month. This thing may flip me over to Yamaha.

 

 

We play for free. We get paid to set up and tear down.
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Gotta love this place!

Lotsa useful imput, guys. Thanks.

Yeah, it's mainly reasonably tweakable B&B sounds and layers I'm after.

I'll most likely wait to test the CP5, although I see a potential deal breaker - no sliders for layer parts.

I was considering the CP50 and RD300GX (thinking low expense for fresh sounds) until I saw the dreaded power adapters.

What's up with that? It can't be that much of a pain/expense for manufacturers to add standard power (?)

Thanks again to all for the response.

p.s. Tony, I hope you've been able to find a jam-band up there!

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I'll most likely wait to test the CP5, although I see a potential deal breaker - no sliders for layer parts.

 

The CP-5 has dedicated volume knobs for the six parts (mic input, audio track playback, four piano/synth layers) plus there are six part on/off switches. In addition it has dedicated knobs for the five part EQ.

 

As someone who owns a CP-1, I HIGHLY recommend waiting for the CP-5 to come available.

 

Busch.

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I'll most likely wait to test the CP5, although I see a potential deal breaker - no sliders for layer parts.

 

One thing about Yamaha sliders (they call them faders actually) that's different from Roland is that they have to cross a certain threshold before they become active. Where that threshold is depends on the initial position of the fader and the initial set volume of the part. So when you change a Performance, if you are going to change a part level for all practical purposes you have to pull the fader all the way down first to have it "catch" - then set the level. It's annoying compared to the Roland method.

 

But - if all you are doing is setting four parts or less up in a Performance to be played only on one channel, that's very easy to do on a Yamaha.

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Thanks Bill & Busch.

I usually ride the faders with a piano/horn or whatever type set-up and am just not convinced I'd be comfortable with knobs.

As for the Yamaha faders having to initialize, I've experienced this with Roland occasionally - yes, annoying!

I believe I'll wait and test the CP5.

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Where that threshold is depends on the initial position of the fader and the initial set volume of the part. So when you change a Performance, if you are going to change a part level for all practical purposes you have to pull the fader all the way down first to have it "catch" - then set the level. It's annoying compared to the Roland method.

 

Not so with the XS series. You can have it as mentioned, or set the faders so their level is their position.

What we record in life, echoes in eternity.

 

MOXF8, Electro 6D, XK1c, Motif XSr, PEKPER, Voyager, Univox MiniKorg.

https://www.abandoned-film.com

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