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The audiation poll


MAJUSCULE

Can you audiate?  

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  1. 1. Can you audiate?

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I've finally gotten off my butt and created a poll for this. In case you missed it, I started a thread a little while back about what I learned is called Audiation:

 

Here's the link to the old thread: https://forums.musicplayer.com/ubbthreads.php/topics/2111244/OT_The_mind_and_remembering_mu#Post2111244

 

From wikipedia:

 

Audiation is the process of mentally hearing and comprehending music, even when no physical sound is present. It is a cognitive process by which the brain gives meaning to musical sounds. In essence, audiation of music is analogous to thinking in a language. The term audiation should not be confused with audition, the mere perception of sound. Audiation is also more than just a musical form of auditory imagery. Developed audiation includes the necessary understanding of music to enable the conscious prediction of patterns in unfamiliar music.

 

The term audiation was coined in 1975 by music education researcher Edwin E. Gordon. According to Gordon:

 

Although music is not a language, the process is the same for audiating and giving meaning to music as for thinking and giving meaning to speech. When you are listening to speech, you are giving meaning to what was just said by recalling and making connections with what you have heard on earlier occasions. At the same time, you are anticipating or predicting what you will be hearing next, based on your experience and understanding. Similarly, when you are listening to music, you are giving meaning to what you just heard by recalling what you have heard on earlier occasions. At the same time, you are anticipating or predicting what you are hearing next, based on your musical achievement. In other words, when you are audiating as you are listening to music, you are summarizing and generalizing from the specific music patterns you have just heard as a way to anticipate or predict what will follow. Every action becomes an interaction. What you are audiating depends on what you have already audiated. As audiation develops, the broader and deeper it becomes and thus the more it is able to reflect on itself. Members of an audience who are not audiating usually do not know when a piece of unfamiliar, or even familiar, music is nearing its end. They may applaud at any time, or not at all, unless they receive clues from others in the audience who are audiating. Through the process of audiation, we sing and move in our minds, without ever having to sing and move physically.[1] (Gordon, 1997, pp. 5-6)

 

Thanks to MONTUNOMAN for the research!

 

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I take issue with the statement that music is not a language.

 

I would bet that the same areas of the brain are in play with both spoken language and the processes involved with the listening, developing, and analysis of music.

 

Grammar and syntax apply also to music.

 

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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I agree with Mr. Horne on this. Music is a language. Just as grammar can unlock understanding of a language, theory unlocks understanding of music. If I write a chart & give it to another musician, haven't I communicated something in a written language? If I visually cue a band on a ritard, an ending, a punch, an intro, etc., isn't that a language? If I emotionally move an audience with a solo piano performance, aren't I communicating in a language?

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Music is multiple languages, but wikipedia is not an encyclopedia. Contradictions, even in this article, are frequent and edited by users.

 

The term audiation was coined in 1975 by music education researcher Edwin E. Gordon.

As though he discovered a new star in the solar system...

 

Yes, audiation has been experienced by people for centuries, and he deserves credit for coining the term. For the rest of it, I'd need to consult my 'music education research analyst', Alfred E. Neuman.

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