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Need your advice on 3 guitars and amp choice.


Sirspanxalot

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Hello everybody,

 

So i need your opinion on what u would buy out of these 3 guitars because i know all of them are good, i just want to know whats favorited and the differences.

 

1.Fender Classic Player Telecaster Thinline Deluxe Electric Guitar Guitar #1

2.Fender Classic Player Jazzmaster Special Electric Guitar Guitar #2

3.Fender Classic Series '72 Telecaster Thinline Electric Guitar Guitar #3

Just want some of your thoughts on what u would purchase out of these 3 guitars.

Also, i want to buy a marshall stack thats amazing but i just want to spend a maximum of $1000 dollars on it. Also Im very into the band paramore right now and i was wondering if you guys know how they get that guitar tone, because im hooked on it. thanks guys! Your help is appreciated!

Thanks!

Spanx

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I would not buy any Tele, because I do not like the sound of a Tele. I would not buy a Thinline Tele, because I thinkt hat they sound even worse than a Tele.

 

I would not pair a Tele with a Marshall stack...usually a Marshall stack is paired with a fatter sounding instrument.

 

I would not buy a Marshall stack, because I don't want to carry it, because it is too big, and because it is too loud for most club stages.

 

What kind of music do you play? What are you trying to do?

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Welcome to the GPF, Sirspanxalot! Damn, Sam, Helluva handle ya got there! :D:thu:

 

Like Bill says- what styles of music and playing-approach are you going for?

 

You may find that a Marshall stack- even a half-stack - is literally too loud for you; you almost certainly will want a lower-wattage, and smaller, amp than that...

 

I would bet that you would get along VERY well with an Egnater Rebel 20 head and cab, or an Orange Tiny Terror with a Celestion Vintage-30 loaded Orange 1x12 or 2x12 cab, or a Vox Night Trian or... some other 18 to 30 watt or so tube-amp. I've heard good things about the new Marshall Haze, as well.

 

Between those two Teles, I think that you'd most probably prefer the playing-feel of the flatter 9.5" radius fretboard and bigger, fatter frets on the 1st one you listed ("Classic Player" Tele Thinline Deluxe), over the curvier 7.25" r and smaller, perhaps more "vintage" sized frets of the other model. The "Classic Player" Tele Thinline Deluxe will be easier to bend notes on without the strings buzzing and "fretting-out", especially in the upper-middle and higher registers. The 9.5" r of that first one is still nice and vintage-Fendery round, flatter than the earlier vintage-Fender designs yet still with a more pronounced curvature than, say, a Gibson Les Pauls or ES-335s 12" r.

 

Feature-for-feature, they're very similar guitars, both based on the same old dual-humbucker Fender Tele Thinline models produced during the CBS-Fender years.

 

Try here, here, and here for possible info on what guitars, amps, and all that Josh Farro and Taylor York might be using with Paramore...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Hey Paramore is from my town! The singer's mom is a school teacher at the intermediate school my kids went to.

 

Paramore's guitar rig walk-through.

 

See the video in the above link.

 

If you want to copy Paramore's live sound exactly you will need the following:

 

- Gibson Les Paul Standard

- Fender Telecaster Deluxe

- Marshall JCM 2000 head

- Mesa Boogie Dual Recitfier head

- Mesa Boogie 4x12 cabinet

- Boss DD20 Digital Delay

- Digitech Whammy pedal

- A volume pedal

 

Or if you wanted to go on the cheap you could buy a Gibson Les Paul Faded or an Epiphone Les Paul Standard and get a Line 6 Flextone. You would be able to come pretty close to nailing Paramore's sound with this gear.

 

 

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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Hello everybody,

 

So i need your opinion on what u would buy out of these 3 guitars because i know all of them are good, i just want to know whats favorited and the differences.

 

1.Fender Classic Player Telecaster Thinline Deluxe Electric Guitar Guitar #1

2.Fender Classic Player Jazzmaster Special Electric Guitar Guitar #2

3.Fender Classic Series '72 Telecaster Thinline Electric Guitar Guitar #3

Just want some of your thoughts on what u would purchase out of these 3 guitars.

Also, i want to buy a marshall stack thats amazing but i just want to spend a maximum of $1000 dollars on it. Also Im very into the band paramore right now and i was wondering if you guys know how they get that guitar tone, because im hooked on it. thanks guys! Your help is appreciated!

Thanks!

Spanx

 

Go play them and see which one you like the feel of the best.

 

I love Teles and have a standard and a '72 Custom (humbucker in neck). I've played them through a couple of old Marshall JMP heads, a JCM800 head and my trusty Sovtek Mig 50 Midget (which is kind of like a Marshall JCM800 in the high gain input and a darker Fender Bassman in the low gain input). I love how the combination sounds, and got tons of compliments on them whenever I played them.

 

If you want the Paramore sound...

http://www.mtv.com/content/ontv/vma/2008/photo/flipbooks/08-performers/paramore_16001154_wire.jpg

 

The Jazzmaster would have a little "looser" (rattlier) of a sound, though the Classic Player has shortened the string scale just a bit by moving the tailpiece closer to the bridge, which makes the tension a little stiffer.

 

I have a jazzmaster and I love that, too. Think more of the Kurt Cobain/Sonic Youth sound if you plan on playing it through a Marshall... a little twangier in a way, but I like the texture.

 

Maybe the Jaguar or Jazzmaster Classic thing they make now with humbuckers instead of the single coil white pickups might give you more of the heavy rock sound.

 

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...If you want the Paramore sound...

http://www.mtv.com/content/ontv/vma/2008/photo/flipbooks/08-performers/paramore_16001154_wire.jpg

...

Josh implied the LesPaul was his primary guitar in the interview I posted above. He said he really liked his Tele Deluxe as well, but that the LP was what he used most of the time.

 

I'd figure any reasonable quality, moderate output humbucker equipped solid-body plugged into a Marshall (or Marshall-like) amp ought to get you most of the way there. If you want to do the octave stuff or delay things that he does you will need to get some pedals to pull it off.

 

Josh has a nice straight ahead rock tone. I really like it.

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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I knew a guy once who was in love with Eric Clapton's tone. To him, that was the penultimate guitar sound. He was fortunate enough to be fairly well off, so he bought everything he read that Clapton used. He got the Clapton Strat, the Marshall amps, everything he could get to have the same set-up as Clapton. He did that for a number of years, spent a boatload of cash on gear, and ended up saying "but I still don't sound like Clapton. What am I doing wrong?" Well, at least he had enough of an ear to know he didn't sound like Clapton. What was wrong?

 

His problem was that a major component of the tone you make is in your hand and fingers, and how you use them. He didn't know how to imitate Clapton's technique. If you are going after a tone, spend a lot of time listening to the tone in question, and see if you can figure out how to make that tone. Is he doing a vibrato, does he slide into and/or out of the notes, is he picking every note or doing a lot of hammers and pulls, is he muting the strings and from where, anything that might contribute to the sound he's making. That's the ticket to finding the tone you want.

 

As for the right instrument, the better question for you than which of these guitars would someone else buy is "which, if any, of these guitars do I like them after I have played them?" What we like and what you like may have major differences. Get out try those axes for yourself.

 

Believe it or not, half the fun of playing is figuring out how to. Have fun.

 

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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FWIW, I've always loved the Jazzmaster, had two of them. Both were different.... different binding and fret markers, different curve on the fretboard, different feel, though they both sounded the same. Wish I still had them. But both were from the 1960s, I've never even played a reissue.

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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FWIW, I've always loved the Jazzmaster, had two of them. Both were different.... different binding and fret markers, different curve on the fretboard, different feel, though they both sounded the same. Wish I still had them. But both were from the 1960s, I've never even played a reissue.

 

A friend of mine had an arsenal of them... started putting every one in pawn shops he could find in layaway when they were going for $100 in the early 80s when we were kids. I played a bunch of his (mind you, they were all mostly neglected when he bought them, so they'd been nursed back to health) and yeah... not very consistent, but always fun and inspiring and full of quirky character. The reissues (the one I have is a Japanese reissue from the late 80s) maybe feel more consistently, but for a while the electronics were dodgy. I think they've only recently concentrated on that end of it. I'm sure Seymour Duncan sold a lot of Jazzmaster replacement pickups over the last decade.

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Josh implied the LesPaul was his primary guitar in the interview I posted above. He said he really liked his Tele Deluxe as well, but that the LP was what he used most of the time.

 

I'd figure any reasonable quality, moderate output humbucker equipped solid-body plugged into a Marshall (or Marshall-like) amp ought to get you most of the way there. If you want to do the octave stuff or delay things that he does you will need to get some pedals to pull it off.

 

Josh has a nice straight ahead rock tone. I really like it.

 

I kind of thought our guy here was looking to start with something a little less expensive than the Les Paul.

 

but yeah, you're right. I'm more of a Fender guy, for whatever reason. The Les Paul I play is one of the '50s special reissues with the P100 pickups. I like the straight neck angle and the flat top... you know, the more Tele like things about it. Those are in the Fender price range, as well... and through a nice high gain amp it has a ton of bottom, and screams like Leslie West when you want it to.

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I'd go with #1, cuz the dual range buckers are cool, and I've lusted after a Thinline for years.

 

But, with no budgetary constraints, I'd go with a G&L ASAT Thinline AND a Tom Anderson Droptop.

 

If a grand is your amp budget, it's gonna be an old Marshall stack, and in rough shape at that, if it must be a Marshall stack, but a used JCM800 50 watt combo might be within reach, and is one of the most satisfying amps ever built!

Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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I say if you're thinking of buying an amp for $1000 or less, get something small to practice on (or use whatever you've got and bear the pain) and save up for whatever you would consider to be THE amplifier you need to get what you want done. Don't half-ass your purchases to something limited by budget if you can help it, because with a choice like that, you may end up upgrading again, and again, and again, and again, wasting precious money along the way, regardless of if you sell the old ones. Finding your tone is never cheap, but compromising is even more expensive in the long run. (this all can be said about your choices in guitars as well. Dont ever buy another guitar after your first one unless it's something that fulfills a job necessary for your guitaring (rather than a mediocre guitar bought in preparation for a better one of the same type))

 

Also, be warned that huge stacks (like the other posts before me have said) are a HASSLE. I already have a Diezel Herbert and a Mesa 2x12 and that's already a pain as it is! The amplifier you need to get doesn't need to be a head with a cab; there's many great amplifiers out there in combo form that'll be easier to carry. I love paramore-- i've seen them live a few times, but it doesnt mean you have to drive stacks like they do. Mesa makes some great combos that'll get you the same tone with less back ache! ;)

My Gear:

 

82 Gibson Explorer

Ibanez 03 JEM7VWH

PRS McCarty Soapbar

Diezel Herbert 2007

 

Peters '11 Brahms Guitar

Byers '01 Classical

Hippner 8-Str Classical

Taylor 614ce

Framus Texan

 

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