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2 V.A.'s, overkill?


TaurusT

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Got offered a Korg R3

Already have a Roland JP-8000. Would it be worth it? Or is it just overkill.

It's for allround music production, but also some progressive rock and electronic ambient/trance/industrial stuff.

 

Let me know your thoughts especially if you've had both instruments.

 

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Completely different animals. I regret selling my JP8080 -- especially as they carry quite a premium on the used market. At the time it was the only way to fund an NL3. Some argue the V-Synth can do anything the JP-8000 can do, but I prefer the latter's interface as it is overall more ergonomic.

 

The Korg R3 is a mildly crippled version of the RADIAS which nevertheless has an important piece of functionality that almost made me go for it instead: DWG's. The MS2000 series had DWG's as well, and they harken back to the DW8000/EX8000 series of the early to mid 80's, which was a hybrid analog/digital synth.

 

DWG's can sound very musical and expressive compared to less evolved S+S systems. I am only using the VA and Vocoder part of my RADIAS, having little interest in the sample-based part. The R3's DWG replacement for the RADIAS sample playback block is overall more interesting, but opinions will always differ on which sounds better. The DWG's have a bit of an analog character to them even though essentially digital, and have some mild similarities to what Roland did with the D50 series and currently with the V-Synths.

 

The thing that distinguishes most similarly-spec'ed synths is usually the filters, and often also the basic waveforms if there is a huge qualitative difference (most commonly in the PWM's vs. the sawtooth waves). But the JP-series and the RADIAS series are not even all that similarly spec'ed.

 

For me, the R3 and RADIAS are worth the price of admission alone for what is arguably the best Vocoder on the market, even if I didn't bother with the VA engine.

Eugenio Upright, 60th Anniversary P-Bass, USA Geddy Lee J-Bass, Yamaha BBP35, D'angelico SS Bari, EXL1,

Select Strat, 70th Anniversary Esquire, LP 57, Eastman T486, T64, Ibanez PM2, Hammond XK4, Moog Voyager

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There's no such a thing as too many synths. There's no such a thing as too much sex or too much money either.

 

Unfortunately, I've never had any of those problems. :rolleyes::bor:

 

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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I have the R3 and the Novation A-Station. I WANT to add the JP-8000 to my rig if I could. I am a fan of having a diverse sound palette and since each one implements the synthesis differently, I see them as complimentary boards, like having a Motif and Fantom in your rig.

 

Besides, the First Law of G.A.S. states "more is better..."

Yamaha (Motif XS7, Motif 6, TX81Z), Korg (R3, Triton-R), Roland (XP-30, D-50, Juno 6, P-330). Novation A Station, Arturia Analog Experience Factory 32

 

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I've never played an R3, but I own a JP-8000, as well as a Waldorf Micro Q (another VA). They sound _completely_ different. Every brand of VA I've played has sounded different than another. Sure, there's some crossover, but if you think you can benefit from the increased palette, go for it. People use multiple ROMplers, or have multiple sample libraries of similar sounds and think nothing of it. VAs (and RAs) are the same -- they all sound slightly different and let you add additional colors to your music.
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And if you're talking live, then it also becomes a question of how they blend on stage with your other gear and the rest of the band.

 

I sold all of my Waldorf gear because it didn't blend, and because what I like best about Waldorf is captured even better in their software ($79 for virtual analog percussion a la Attack; amazing PPG Wave soft synth; VA filters a la D-Pole effect plug-in).

 

It's good to have variety because sometimes you need to cut through and other times you need to just fill the gaps. I'd say the Roland stuff is ideal for the latter. A more biting synth like a Prophet, AN1x or PLG equivalent, or perhaps RADIAS/R3, can then handle your leads and basses where you need to compete with the guitarist :-).

Eugenio Upright, 60th Anniversary P-Bass, USA Geddy Lee J-Bass, Yamaha BBP35, D'angelico SS Bari, EXL1,

Select Strat, 70th Anniversary Esquire, LP 57, Eastman T486, T64, Ibanez PM2, Hammond XK4, Moog Voyager

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Too many synths? HAHA!

 

The George Carlin rule applies here....if you don't have enough room in your house for yet another synth, you NEED a bigger house!

 

Too much "Stuff" warrants a bigger house at all times.

 

You can always get a sub prime loan for bigger digs.

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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