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B.C. Rico...? ? ?


stamplicker

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all I could find but no Pics...

Info Link quater way down

 

Imports: B.C. Rico

It was at about the time of the appearance of the Eagle in around 76 that B.C. Rich first began importing guitars. Through a friend living in Tokyo, Rico arranged to have some copies of the Eagle made and imported carrying the B.C. Rico brand name. Bernie Rico chose this name so as to distinguish these imports from the guitars being made in the U.S. These were excellent copies with neck-through construction. Rico doesnt recall exactly who made these guitars, but thinks it may have been the Kasuga factory, one of the primary Japanese suppliers of quality guitars at the time.

 

Unfortunately, the B.C. Ricos ran into legal problems right out of the gate. The Rico Reed company sued B.C. Rich over the use of the Rico brand name, and the first shipment of B.C. Rico guitars was impounded by customs awaiting a decision. Since Rico was Bernies last name, it was pretty much a foregone conclusion that B.C. Rich would have the right to use the name, which it did. However, in the interim the decision was made to simply use the B.C. Rich name, which would henceforth be applied to all B.C. Rich guitars, regardless of where they were manufactured. (All imports carry an additional modifier such as N.J. Series or Platinum which idicate they are made offshore.)

 

As a result of the hassles over the name, these first B.C. Rico imports are quite rare; only about 150 or so were ever imported before the brand name was abandoned.

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Thats what I thought, so I took as best pic I could to show that part. Looks more like hairline crack in the paint. Neck feels and looks as straight as a neck could be. Even with only 4 strings on it, (that are in v ery very bad shape), it tuned and MAnnn Rock me Sustain ooozes out. Pots are very, well, they sorta work, cleaning in order I think. The bridge pickup I'm not sure if it's ment to sit on that much of an angle or if the adjustment is shot in one side? Still need to take apart the safe areas and clean it up. The bridge it self is intersting, tried to get a good shot of it, but will clean it up and take another pic of it. Main concern was the neck, but as mention, it feels and plays true, so thinking it's paint crack not neck unsetting.
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Personally, I'd take out the pots (but keep them safe) and replace them, but I'd only clean up the paintwork, I don't think I'd refinish it - let it wear its Scars of Age with pride.

 

I think those are hairline cracks that come with age & the normal flexing of use (I hope).

 

Mucho Mojo!

 

G.

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the World will know Peace": Jimi Hendrix

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The Geoff - blame Caevan!!!

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Thats whatI"m thinking about the hairlines, Old age baldness ;)

 

And actually when I got up I was like, damn, Think I'll just get new pots replace them and put those away, possibly same with the bridge pickup to, not sure yet, will have to wait till I lift it out. (later today maybe). But when I heard that neck Pickup scream with the crapified strings on it, it Just rocked me! Believe these are the custom dimarzio's that he put in his first instruments if I read it correctly. will know once it's pulled out.

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I know a guy who has a BC Rich Eagle, mid-70s vintage, and it has all the switches and knobs a BC RIch from those days all had. Whart was weird was it was carved from one piece of wood, neck and all. Ther was not a glue joint on it, except for the fretboard being glued to the neck, and the inlays. That thing must have cost a bundle new, but my friend picked it up for a couple hundred at a pawn shop.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

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I'm kinda shocked at the number of posters here that weren't aware that Bernie Rico was the founder of B.C. Rich, and when B.C. Rich took their production to Japan during the 80's, Bernie kept making these gorgeous guitars here stateside, until they finally brokered a deal where Rich would get complete control of the body designs, with the caveat that they maintain a US Custom shop (which they still do)
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Actually picker, I was wondering that thing myself. It's odd how you run your hand along it, it doesn't feel like two peices in way. Once again lots of glue and good paint job and you'd never notice, but the fret board has some wear along the side, but none of it spreading to the neck. Still have to get it cleaned up, see if I can get some half decent shots of the fret board. Still going nuts trying to find out what model this is. It's like a seagull2 it hink.but it's missing switches.. not that they were ever there, just what makes me think it's not that.
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I know a guy who has a BC Rich Eagle, mid-70s vintage, and it has all the switches and knobs a BC RIch from those days all had. Whart was weird was it was carved from one piece of wood, neck and all. Ther was not a glue joint on it, except for the fretboard being glued to the neck, and the inlays. That thing must have cost a bundle new, but my friend picked it up for a couple hundred at a pawn shop.

 

Hey Picker, re-read of the text stamplicker posted above. They weren't set neck instruments. They were neck-through instruments. The body is actually two wings attached to the sides of the neck piece. ;)

 

Uh... Griff. Maybe it's just me but in all the years of guitar magazines, buying and working in MI retailers, etc. I never heard of Bernie Rico before now. I guess you equate him with Hartley Peavey, Ned Steinberger, Paul Reed Smith, Seymour Duncan or Grover Jackson, all of whom are icons in the industry for the products that bear their names. I don't see it given my interest in guitars over 30+ years without ever seeing his name in a magazine or B.C. Rich ad. Interesting....

 

 

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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Griff - thank you for the insight, I had no idea until I did some more poken around that it was infact Mr. Rico's named creations.

 

Now on some side notes, I found this useful bit of information from a bc rich players forum. Asking and proding for info in regards to it...

RazzleeDog13 - Nagoya Seagull II, set neck late 81 to early 83 . . . looks pretty banged up but still a cool guitar.

This is a Nagoya (import from Nagoya Japan) most of those don't have the extra switches of USA BCRs, though some do.

acstorfer - very cool early rico, definitely worth restoring. man i hope those cracks are just in the finish.

 

Then "Lorne" site admin, (after reading some posts around there, seems to be the know-all of BCR's), agreed with Razzleedog13.

 

So, if it's a setneck? then how does that differ from neckthrough? As I see it, A set neck would be set and glued in place of the body? and if that's so then those hairlines should give me lots to be concerned about, but if it's neckthrough, then the hairlines should only be in the finish. Still seeking more info. 'Drat

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Neil - you're right, that came off bad. I just assume that the scope of my knowledge in guitars is so limited that basically "If I know it, everyone knows it"

 

:D

 

Youse gots knowledge da rest of us don', buddy. :thu:

 

I should've mentioned, thanks for sharing that! I wasn't sure if Rico was B.C. Rich or a contractor who manufactured the Japanese instrument runs whose name was coincidentally close to that of the product. ;)

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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Apparently, my knowledge of the product is a bit incomplete - seeing how this is a Rico that was built in Nagoya.

 

Lots of folks believed that the "NJ" in NJ Series stood for New Jersey - it was indeed the Nagoya, Japan manufacturing plant. Funny, back then we all thought the NJ stuff was junk. Nowadays, I wish BCR's offshore stuff was that nice - the Platinum series is Korean, and the Gold series is Chinese....

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Seee thats the funny thing, I can't find NJ anywhere on it. of course I'm complete ignorant to the BCR-family. I never followed much if any of it. All I know is what I've been finding looking around and putting 7 and 7 together to get one postive answer. back the NJ part, As I can see, it states NJ on the items.. "NJ series" sooooo that would either mean, "NJ Series" represents New Jersey or it is an import... If it's the later, then this would date the guitar as one of the lawsuit squueze throughs if I'm correct? since there is no NJ anywhere on it.

 

Sorry lots of questions still with out answers.

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No, you won't find "NJ Series" on the old Rico stuff, because he didn't use series identification. It was either Made in USA or not, as far as on-guitar designations, and if it wasn't Made in USA, it was a Nagoya production.

 

NJ Series, along with all the rest of the series, were B.C. Rich designations. If they were Cali Custom Shop, it just said "Made in USA" - otherwise it was Japanese (NJ), Korean (Platinum), or more recently Chinese (Gold).

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Silly Stamplicker... It's in the first part you quoted about B.C. Rico history...

 

Rico was used to denote the Japanese imports, but immediately disappeared after the first run of 150 instruments because of the lawsuit. Then Bernie decided to use B.C Rich on all the company's products, adding the NJ and other designations to indicate imports and where they were imported from.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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Silly Stamplicker... It's in the first part you quoted about B.C. Rico history...

 

Rico was used to denote the Japanese imports, but immediately disappeared after the first run of 150 instruments because of the lawsuit. Then Bernie decided to use B.C Rich on all the company's products, adding the NJ and other designations to indicate imports and where they were imported from.

 

SOrry missed this, you posted at the same time I responded to Giff. That's what was tossing me, if the guitar was 81-83ish, the lawsuit was '76ish I think. But he did put the Rico name on acoustics I do believe, before the manufacturing of electrics. Now the reason I question what I had posted earlier 'cause that was the same write-up on many different pages/sites, but word for word, (might as well copy and pasted the same article to lazy to type your own deal). I came across another today I think that said "several hundred" in place of 150.

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