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Straight or right-angle?!


_Sweet Willie_

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How do you like your instrument cable plugs? :confused:

 

1. Straight - straight

2. Right-angle - straight

3. Right-angle - right-angle

 

Do you have a preference for which kind connects to your bass, your amp, your pedal board...? Does it matter to you whether the bass has a sidejack or frontjack? So many options!

 

What are the merits of one vs the other?

 

Straight - straight has always been just dandy for me. But I wonder...am I missig out on a whole exciting world of right-angle plugs?!?!? :freak:

 

Peace.

--Dub $$

 

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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I use straight on everything.

 

I prefer side mounted jacks. It really depends on what you're doing. I can see the reasoning for front mounted jacks for heavy studio work as with straight cables you're able to sit without worrying about what is pressing on your cable. For anything else I prefer side mounted jacks as they are just more out of the way while playing standing up.

 

Some of this is aesthetic preference as well. I generally dislike the looks of front mounted jacks.

 

Feel free to visit my band's site

Delusional Mind

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I prefer right-angle--straight, with the right-angle plug for the bass.

 

It just seems to tuck it out of the way a little better.

 

Preach.

 

I have right angle plugs all over my pedalboard. It allows you to stick stuff much closer together and on a pedalboard where space is not something that is readily available (like mine) you want all the extra help you can get.

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I will only used right-angle plugs on the cable between my pedal-board and my bass--it's just less likely to get bonked or knocked out at shows. The plug to the board can be either right-angled or straight. Obviously, right-angled plugs take up less space. For my pedalboard to my amp, I prefer a right-angle plug on the board side and a straight plug for the amp.

 

I also like hot butter on my breakfast toast.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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For my bass, I don't have any Right-angle ones at the moment; but have thought about them. Last one I had was on a curly cable... long time ago. But it looked good on my ES 335!

 

On my pedal board, I've used what ever worked best for each pedal. Usually the right-angle plugs on pedals with side-mounted jacks, and straights on front-end mounted jacks. Or whatever I had on hand at the time.

 

I've come to appreciate the front-mounted jack on a bass. It's easier to set the bass down in it's case while still plugged in (if you don't have a stand with you).

"Am I enough of a freak to be worth paying to see?"- Separated Out (Marillion)

NEW band Old band

 

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I prefer right-angle, my G&L would prefere a right angle, but the jack on my toby doesn't like the average right-angle plug so my cables are straight-straight. I hear there are angled plugs with longer shanks, but haven't yet scored one.

 

 

- Matt W.
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I use straight - straight for no real reason other than I didn't put much thought into it.

 

The next one I buy (which may be awhile) will be right angle - straight. That would seem to make a lot more sense on the Fenders.

Push the button Frank.
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The strange thing about my Wal is that the jack socket is recessed about half an inch into the side of the body. This means I don't have the option of using anything other than straight plugs . . . not that it's bothered me. Except that is when I merrily brought home a Planet Waves cable (the kind you can mute) only to find that the shape of the plug didn't fit in my bass.

Now I'm careful to only buy plugs with parallel sides.

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I like straight - straight from the pedal board to the amp.

 

I prefer straight - right angle from the pedal board to the bass, with the right angle on the bass.

 

On my pedal board I only have right angle patch cords. I do have a couple of straight 1/4" patch cords, but they are in the parts bin and gig bag as spares.

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How do you like your instrument cable plugs?

 

1. Straight - straight

Most of my cords fit this description.

2. Right-angle - straight

For a Fender bass with the jack on the front of the bass, I prefer this, but I'll use a straight-straight cord if that's what I grab first.

3. Right-angle - right-angle

Little short ones on the pedal board....they take up less room.

 

 

Does it matter to you whether the bass has a sidejack or frontjack?

I'd prefer a sidejack but that's not a factor in choosing an instrument to buy.

 

What are the merits of one vs the other?

It's all good. :thu:

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Many amp heads I've seen would be a problem with right angle plugs. They don't have the room for the part of the jack/cable that's flush against the face.

 

Depending on your pedal board, usually right angles are better (Boss makes that straight thing to connect multiple Boss pedals).

 

My instrument cables are double straights, but I could be OK with a right angle on the bass side.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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I like these:

 

http://www.bayoucables.com/store/catalog/images/ra1.gif

 

That way, a man or woman has a choice.

 

I don't like those because part of the tone, especially 23.5 to 25.7k, can't negotiate the turn and gets stuck in that reservoir at the top of that picture. And then, once in a while, the upper mids cake up and reach critical mass and all spew out at once.

 

You don't want to be in front of a horn when that happens, even when it's attenuated to zero.

"For instance" is not proof.

 

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I don't like those because part of the tone, especially 23.5 to 25.7k, can't negotiate the turn and gets stuck in that reservoir at the top of that picture. And then, once in a while, the upper mids cake up and reach critical mass and all spew out at once.

 

I like the roll-off of the frequencies, but I did have a problem of the build-up at a gig. I drill a small hole in the top of the reservoir to release the pressure; just do not drill it too big or you will lose too many of the frequencies. I used a micro-bit with my Dremel, about 1/128".

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The only thing I prefer the right angle 90 degree plug on is into my instrument. My fender Precision has a side socket. If I use the strap to hold it close to the body there is very little chance of it snaging and being pulled our accidentally. I don't use pedals but if I did, I would certainly use the right angle plugs.

Rocky

"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb, voting on what to eat for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb, contesting the vote."

Benjamin Franklin

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From bass= right angle----amp=straight----effects straight(because right angles run into the ground or each other on the back of pedals, but for side mounted pedals right angles are great. Speakons for cabs and amps when possible, or straight if not possible.

 

 

 

 

 

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I prefer right-angle--straight, with the right-angle plug for the bass.

 

It just seems to tuck it out of the way a little better.

 

Me too, right angle on the bass. I lost my last two good ones, and now I have expensive cheapoes straight/straight... no one wants to steal those.

 

The problem with being famous is some people want souvenirs... :cool:

;^)
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I don't like those because part of the tone, especially 23.5 to 25.7k, can't negotiate the turn and gets stuck in that reservoir at the top of that picture. And then, once in a while, the upper mids cake up and reach critical mass and all spew out at once.

 

I like the roll-off of the frequencies, but I did have a problem of the build-up at a gig. I drill a small hole in the top of the reservoir to release the pressure; just do not drill it too big or you will lose too many of the frequencies. I used a micro-bit with my Dremel, about 1/128".

 

My brother (a machinist) developed a 'corkscrew' bit that's used in CNC Machines as an oil supply line.

 

When used as a 'frequency relief' tap in the above referenced jack, the harsh 2nd/3rd order harmonics are allowed to escape. As they go out the tap hole, a vacuum is formed that allows the fundamental and 1st order harmonics to pass (unfiltered) through the conductor.

 

It's a life-saver. We've applied for a patent.

 

Jim

Jim

Confirmed RoscoeHead

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I prefer right-angle--straight, with the right-angle plug for the bass.

 

It just seems to tuck it out of the way a little better.

 

Agree!

 

I use both Str-RA or Str-Str. I haven't had much luck finding a Str-RA 25' cord so my short cords are Str-RA and the long ones are Str-Str.

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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I actually prefer right angle <-> right angle. I put my cord through my strap and those hang better on the bass. I also loop the amp side of the cable through a handle on my rack so there's no jack-pulling and breakage from stepping on a cable. If my pedalboard is in the middle, I like right angles for both in and out of that as well.

 

That said, I think all my working cables are straight...it seems harder to find the sealed right angle cables, and the unsealed connectors seem to fail easier (although they are fixable once they fail, where the sealed connectors are not).

 

I also like Tabasco sauce on my eggs.

 

Dave

 

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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I prefer right-angle--straight, with the right-angle plug for the bass.

 

It just seems to tuck it out of the way a little better.

 

Same here. No pedals to worry about.

My whole trick is to keep the tune well out in front. If I play Tchaikovsky, I play his melodies and skip his spiritual struggle. ~Liberace
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