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So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
#3030689 02/27/20 05:34 AM
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I've read articles saying that Pro Tools destroyed music, Auto-Tune destroyed music, recording to a click destroyed music, quantization destroyed music, maximizers destroyed music, etc. etc.. But to paraphrase NRA bumper stickers, "Machines don't kill music, people kill music."

I really think it's silly to blame the technology because people misuse it.

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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3030694 02/27/20 06:57 AM
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First, name a culture or people who do not have any music in their lives, ever.

And then there's critters - birds and such. I've heard music in the wind, the waves and the thunder.

People have made horrible music all sorts of ways before they had all that cool stuffs.
I've had my moments and look forward to more Music Murder! :- D

In my early teens I got a Radio Shack magnetic cartridge preamp, some "hi fi" crapola. I got some RCA to 1/4" adapters, plugged my guitar into Input 1, took Output 1 and plugged that into Input 2 and from Output 2 to a crappy Univox solid state guitar amp. The signal overload I was shoving through that thing sent it into self oscillation - a G note I think. It would play the drone, sputter out when you picked a note and at that point it became a ring modulator. Of all the crappy tones I ever created that was by far the crappiest. I didn't even like it much although I goofed around with it a few times because my parents hated it. :-D

That should have killed all music. Didn't do nothing...


There is never enough time to be in a hurry...
Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3030722 02/27/20 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton
<...snip...>
I really think it's silly to blame the technology because people misuse it.


I couldn't agree more.

But we have to insert our own personal tastes into the equation.

Personally, if I hear obvious auto-tune it turns me off. Others obviously love it because it's popular.

As a singer, and a sax player (saxes aren't in tune with themselves, I have to adjust each note with my lip) I work hard to sing and play on pitch. I also like to play with pitch often intentionally playing a note a bit flat or sharp for tension and sometimes bringing it to pitch. Much like a guitarist playing a note one fret below and bending it up to pitch. It's expression that auto-tune robs my ears of.

Example: In Otis Redding's I've Been Loving You Too Long he sings, "You walked out" The word "out" is held about 3 beats, he hits it flat and gradually pulls it up to almost but not quite in tune. The end result is you can hear the pain in his voice by the dissonance created. Auto-tune would ruin that moment.

Rap bores me because I'm not that interested in lyrics. My main interest in music is melody, harmony, rhythm and how all these ingredients interact with each other. Others love it. BTW when I was young I listened to some things that bore me now that I've developed as a musician, so I can't say anything bad about rap.

A lot of EDM bores me in the same way that Philip Glass music does. Too much repetition to keep my interest for long. I can't say it's bad music though. Just not my 'cup of tea'.

When I was in school playing classical, when we played Bach, Mozart and especially many of the other pre-romantic era composers, the effort was to be so precise that it was quantized.

* * *

We can learn all the music theory available, we can have and know how to use all the modern tools available, and we can practice until we are technically as close to perfect as humanly possible, but that doesn't guarantee good music.

The final element that is needed is talent. And sadly, talent isn't something that can be taught, although it can be developed.

We've probably all heard some players who had limited command of their instruments and played very captivating music.

On the other hand, there are technically "monster" players who are doing all the right things, but aren't making good, expressive music. Instead they are playing what I call empty notes. They know how to use the tool, but don't have the talent to make expressive music with the tool. (Of course it's best if you have the talent AND the technique)

Same goes for all the wonderful digital and analog tools we have to bring the music to the public.

For example: Compression isn't necessarily a bad thing, but too much sucks the life out of a song by diminishing the dynamics to the point where the expression is gone. Think the "volume wars" days. You need soft to appreciate loud.

Sometimes the modern tools make it so easy to get the notes down that people with less talent and not enough experience are able to do what it used to take long dedicated years of practice for a person to do.

Example: Back in the early days of MIDI, when we went to usenet/newsgroups instead of forums, there was a MIDI newsgroup that accepted binary files. One person posted a huge catalog of Steely Dan files. Note for note perfection (he/she must have had scores) but step entered, quantized with no dynamics. IMO it was terrible. Give that person an E for effort, but not a passing grade.

But on the other hand look at all the wonderful music that has been made with the tools, used by the right people, at the right time, and with the right amount of application.

So to repeat, I definitely agree with you Craig, it isn't the tools, it's the users.

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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3030737 02/27/20 05:29 PM
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Lug.

Lug killed music.

The end.


Play. Just play.
Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Notes_Norton #3030738 02/27/20 05:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Notes_Norton
In Otis Redding's I've Been Loving You Too Long he sings, "You walked out" The word "out" is held about 3 beats, he hits it flat and gradually pulls it up to almost but not quite in tune. The end result is you can hear the pain in his voice by the dissonance created. Auto-tune would ruin that moment.
I've often said B B King wouldn't have had a career if his solos had been pitch corrected - I don't think that upward bend on a flatted seventh ever quite made it up to the tonic smile

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3030790 02/28/20 12:11 AM
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Stretching notes was sort of a core stylistic thing that Johnny Hodges (with Duke Ellington) used. I love his style. And watching this "Sunny Side of the Street" I enjoyed Ellington's fills on the piano. Great style. Now that I think about it I guess stretching notes is a horn thing in general. I still love the way Johnny Hodges does it.


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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3030792 02/28/20 12:34 AM
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Quantizing! Auto Tune, and Beat Detective. Made many producers, want to have complete control of songs. To make the sound more machine, and less soul and movement!

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Paul Kondig #3030805 02/28/20 01:42 AM
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Originally Posted by paulkondig
Quantizing! Auto Tune, and Beat Detective. Made many producers, want to have complete control of songs. To make the sound more machine, and less soul and movement!

This! I will be talking about this in my Synthplex seminar. It's an age-old issue for electronic musicians; the idea that whatever can be controlled, MUST be controlled with intent, which can prove disastrous.


Dr. Mike Metlay (PhD in nuclear physics, golly gosh) grin
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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Dr Mike Metlay #3030810 02/28/20 02:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Dr Mike Metlay
Originally Posted by paulkondig
Quantizing! Auto Tune, and Beat Detective. Made many producers, want to have complete control of songs. To make the sound more machine, and less soul and movement!

This! I will be talking about this in my Synthplex seminar. It's an age-old issue for electronic musicians; the idea that whatever can be controlled, MUST be controlled with intent, which can prove disastrous.


^^ This.

And it's damaging cumulatively.

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Paul Kondig #3030823 02/28/20 03:32 AM
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Originally Posted by paulkondig
Quantizing! Auto Tune, and Beat Detective. Made many producers, want to have complete control of songs. To make the sound more machine, and less soul and movement!
I truly believe that pitch correction has made my vocals MORE human and spontaneous. But not because of the pitch correction per se - because I'm free to sing more spontaneously and with more feel, knowing that if I blow a couple notes in an otherwise good take, I can fix them. There's no reason why these tools have to be straight jackets, they can be safety nets. You hope you don't fall, and you try not to fall...but if you do, at least the net is there.

However, I believe that requires "fixing" only notes that sound wrong. Engineers who "select all" and then quantize or pitch-correct, or apply tools based on what they see rather than what they hear, are the reason why these tools have a bad reputation.

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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3030828 02/28/20 04:00 AM
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Now, I also want to point out that I listen to a lot of electronic music or music that is otherwise not directly played by humans or had its origins in electronic music.

My agreeing with Mike Metlay is not for this sort of music. It's for music that was historically played by humans through acoustic or electric instruments that had microphones stuffed in front of them, played as an ensemble.

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3030844 02/28/20 09:03 AM
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I guess I disagree with the entire premise that music is unlistenable. There are genres that I don't prefer that are mixed or mastered in a way that I would not hear applied to other genres, but sometimes that's the right sound for that particular style. I don't like auto tune and think it's overused, but that doesn't mean the opinions of people who DO like it are invalid. What's unlistenable to me may sound great to somebody else and vice versa. I happen to like heavily quantized synthetic music if that's what fits the genre - I love bands like Deco, Human League, etc. But I wouldn't want it applied to blues or jazz. There is still a lot of great music out there, you just have to find the needle in an ever growing haystack.


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Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.
Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
J. Dan #3030851 02/28/20 12:29 PM
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Ah, yes, the idea that Machinery somehow replaces Musicianship?

I remember a great deal of blowback when Synthesizers first allegedly threatened to displace "real Musicians". IMHO, the most absurd illustration of this conflict came when "Starlight Express" hit the NYC stage, with an all-Synth score, and the Musicians' Union forced through a contract clause wherein the theatre had to hire an Orchestra to sit backstage and do nothing, while the show was on.

While it's possible for a so-called Producer to sit at a console and string together pre-packaged Beats & Loops, get a Vocalist to sing something over it, and then release the results as a composition, the most interesting Music doesn't write itself; somebody has to sit at the Controller, or Keyboard, and create it.

In the same vein, I have yet to hear a Drum Machine that can play with all the nuance of a Neil Peart (R.I.P.) or a Bill Bruford. If it could be done, you'd still need someone like a Neil or Bill to program it; in other words, Musicianship takes precedence.

A purist, or reductionist might argue that the only true, natural Instrument available to us is the human voice; everything else is simply a device made to generate sounds. OTOH, I would hesitate to suggest to the 1st Chair Violinist of the NSO that they were essentially on the same level as a DJ punching buttons on a digital console . . . not unless I was standing very far away.


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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Winston Psmith #3030875 02/28/20 04:05 PM
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A
Originally Posted by Winston Psmith
<...snip...>
In the same vein, I have yet to hear a Drum Machine that can play with all the nuance of a Neil Peart (R.I.P.) or a Bill Bruford. If it could be done, you'd still need someone like a Neil or Bill to program it; in other words, Musicianship takes precedence<...>


While my primary instrument is sax, my first instrument was drums.

A drum machine cannot play with the nuances of a real drummer (I might add Bernard Purdy and Hal Blaine to your excellent examples). Even an electronic drum kit has it's liabilities.

When I play drums, the force I strike the drum (add cymbal to drum in all these examples), the location I strike it, the angle of the stick at the moment of impact, how firmly I'm holding the stick, and whether I'm using my left or right hand all make subtle differences in the tone and percussive accent of the sound. Drummers don't plan this consciously (at least I don't) but aural feedback and reflexes over time take care of it. That's why when you hear a real drummer play a single stroke roll it doesn't sound like a machine gun (left and right hand, slightly different spots on the drum, different angle of the sticks, and different grips on the sticks).

Latin hand drummers do the same with their hands. A MIDI conga set cannot even approach what a conguero can do.

That doesn't mean MIDI drums are useless or non-musical. There are things synth drums can do that acoustic drums cannot do.

Everything has it's place and there is more than one right way to make music.

As we all seem to agree, it's the player, not the tool.

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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
J. Dan #3030895 02/28/20 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by J. Dead
I guess I disagree with the entire premise that music is unlistenable.

Actually the thread title was a reference to a previous thread, It's time ot make recorded music listenable again, which was not about styles or types of music, but about what I saw as problems related to the misuse of technology - not having dynamics, excessive high end EQ, and always cutting to a click. That doesn't mean that (for example) cutting to a click is inherently unlistenable, but some genres that relied on "breathing" tempos now cut to a click, which takes away what had been used as an emotional component.

Stylistically, any type of music is listenable if people want to listen to it! I just feel that some of the reason for the decline of CD sales is that the music acquired an element of listener fatigue that older music didn't have. I think it's possible that the interest in vinyl has nothing to do with the playback medium, but with the fact that older records had dynamics, tempos that breathed, and reasonable EQ (and that new releases have constraints placed on the mastering - you can't clip a waveform, the stylus literally can't follow it). Streaming's adoption of LUFS is also making music more listenable by taking away the incentive to squash dynamics.

I keep hearing people blame technology like pitch correction and comping for causing "bad" music, but I think blaming the technology makes no sense. It's how people use technology that determines whether you do or don't want to listen to something.

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Winston Psmith #3030903 02/28/20 06:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Winston Psmith
I remember a great deal of blowback when Synthesizers first allegedly threatened to displace "real Musicians".

My reply to those people was always "Who do you think plays synthesizers? Accountants?" smile

Quote
A purist, or reductionist might argue that the only true, natural Instrument available to us is the human voice; everything else is simply a device made to generate sounds. OTOH, I would hesitate to suggest to the 1st Chair Violinist of the NSO that they were essentially on the same level as a DJ punching buttons on a digital console . . . not unless I was standing very far away.

I think that might be apples and oranges, though. I consider the [better] DJs performing engineers, not traditional musicians. It's a very different skill set. I think anyone would agree that a good mix engineer has a unique skill set. Much of what I think makes a DJ "good" is how artfully they apply that same type of skill set to a live performance.

I've taken the stage doing musician-type and DJ-type gigs, and for me they're equally challenging, but for very different reasons. For example, if I finger a chord poorly on guitar and it sounds like crap, a few seconds later it's gone and no one cares. But if I make one split-second mistake in a timing cue or beat match, it can throw off the rest of the set and it's extremely difficult to recover. Also, at least with most of my music gigs, improvisation is a subset of the performance. With DJing, many times it's all about improvisation because you have to read the mood of the crowd so closely. Trying to reconcile improvisation with technical perfection is not easy, especially because higher-level DJing has evolved to working with multiple tracks, effects, sync, bringing in samples, and often, playing instrumental lines along with everything else. It's like those circus acts with the spinning plates. True, they're just plates...but spinning a bunch of them simultaneously isn't easy.

Then again, although in some ways I find it more difficult to pull off a DJ gig than playing guitar and singing in a band...I would find it impossible to pull off being 1st Chair Violinist of the NSO!

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3031001 02/29/20 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton
...I would find it impossible to pull off being 1st Chair Violinist of the NSO!


I'm with you there. I might, emphasis on "might", be able to pull off a decent set as a DJ, given preparation and forethought; I have no business whatsoever approaching the 1st Chair of any Orchestra Instrument.

Back on point, however - I've mentioned this observation before, here in the Forums, but it bears repeating here, in the context of this discussion -

Some years back, while folding laundry or something equally demanding, I caught a show on VH-1 titled "100 Greatest Hits of the 90's". I didn't watch the whole thing, but while I watched, I'd say that easily 70 to 80 precent of the videos featured real bands, 3, or 4, or more people who'd gotten together to sing and play Music, much of which they'd written themselves.

Later that week, I caught part of another, similar show, titled "100 Greatest Hits of the 00's". In this case, I saw maybe 3 or 4 actual bands. The majority of the other videos featured a main Vocal performer, singing or rapping, a group of background dancers, elaborate sets that would have impressed Busby Berkeley or Cecil B. DeMille, but no visible Musicians? It all seemed to be Music designed and conceived by Producers, attempting to push out a mass-market product by the case, like diet sodas, or fruit-flavored vape pods.

There's a meme, I guess, floating around the web, that compares the Lyrics & Writing Credits of Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" with Nicki Minaj's "Stupid Ho"; look it up, if you have a moment.


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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Winston Psmith #3031015 02/29/20 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Winston Psmith
Later that week, I caught part of another, similar show, titled "100 Greatest Hits of the 00's". In this case, I saw maybe 3 or 4 actual bands. The majority of the other videos featured a main Vocal performer, singing or rapping, a group of background dancers, elaborate sets that would have impressed Busby Berkeley or Cecil B. DeMille, but no visible Musicians? It all seemed to be Music designed and conceived by Producers, attempting to push out a mass-market product by the case, like diet sodas, or fruit-flavored vape pods.

I wonder if it might also have something to do with greed. A solo artist doesn't have to split the money with the band. Even with "bands," a lot of times they're one person and hired side musicians.

Part of the lack of traditional bands may also be the lack of traditional places to play. As a teenager, there were lots of places to gig, and you could make actual money - at least enough to cover expenses, and then some. There's a restaurant nearby that used to have bands, but they stopped because with bands, people would come and stay to listen after they finished eating. Without a band, they had faster turnover, and made more money, because people would leave after eating instead of hanging around.

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3031030 02/29/20 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton

I wonder if it might also have something to do with greed. A solo artist doesn't have to split the money with the band. Even with "bands," a lot of times they're one person and hired side musicians.

You might think so, but look at the credits for a lot of recent hit songs and see the number of people credited with writing the song. There are some with a dozen or so.


The great thing about music is that there's always something to learn. The frustrating thing about music is that there's always something to learn!
Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3031044 02/29/20 10:05 PM
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"Unlistenable" is in the ear of the beholder. There are forms of music that I just plain don't like no matter how well they're crafted, so I'd categorize those as "unlistenable" while others may really dig them. I enjoy classical music, even contemporary classical, in general and there's not much that can be done to spoil it for me - unless it's opera. I hate that caterwauling and no matter how great the instrumental music is (and some of it is fabulous) as soon as a soprano or tenor opens his or her mouth, I'm outa there. And when it comes to electronica, I find enough of it boring that I haven't tried very hard to find something I care to listen to. I suspect that much of this form of music is made by people who have experience with computers and maybe DJ-ing, and not with actually composing or performing music. It would be unfair to say that they're not musicians, but most of them couldn't even hum a few bars of what they've produced. And while it's played by real musicians, I have the same feeling about some contemporary jazz. The saxophone is a beautiful instrument, but put four of them in front of a microphone and no other instruments and it gets a bit "honky" to this set of fiddle and banjo ears.

And then there's contemporary airplay-ready pop music where there might be two verses that don't have a lot of meaning, and the chorus consists of the same line (usually closely related to the title of the song) repeated over and over. Quite unlistenable, to me.

Blues - if it's any good at all, it's got feeling. That's lilstenable
Country music - a lot of contemporary country music shares the characteristics of the boring pop music that I don't like to listen to, but classic country music (Hank Williams, Ernest Tubb, Patsy Clyne, etc, and to a large extent Dolly Parton) has emotion, feel, rhythm, often superb musicianship and for the most part, for me, is quite listenable. The old time string band music that I enjoy and play would probably bore most listeners of contemporary music to tears - same tune repeated over and over, and it takes some sensitivity to hear that the banjo backup is different this time through, or the fiddler twists the melody subtly this time or that. I like traditional bluegrass and contemporary bluegrass bands that have brought the style to new music, but some have pushed the envelope too far for me.

So, there's music that I don't like to listen to, and that's my "unlistenable." It might not be yours.

For extra credit - Here's grand opera from Spike Jones with help with Homer and Jethro. Listenable, or unlistenable?


Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Mike Rivers #3031618 03/04/20 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers

So, there's music that I don't like to listen to, and that's my "unlistenable." It might not be yours.


This is it right here. the public at large and some journalists debate what makes music unlistenable, but that is purely personal. And labeling things that are repetitive, dissonant, machine-augmented, or stiff as "unlistenable" is lazy.

Rush's "Grace Under Pressure" album is so compressed and limited that it looks like a solid rectangle on the screen. It makes the songs sound uncarbonated, but there are some great songs that transcend the poor mastering.

"Friday" by Rebecca Black may be the worst song ever to become popular, but it has millions upon millions of views.

Post Malone has really obvious Autotune processing, even live, but I'd rather see him than Celine Dion any day (and I like Celine).

If a piece music is unlistenable, you would never have heard of it in popular culture. So what we are talking about is music that some people in the population find unpleasant. And as Craig said, to blame it on technology or to arbitrarily pick a moment in time that marks the demise of good music is SUCH WASTED OXYGEN.


"For instance" is not proof.
Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3031644 03/04/20 08:00 PM
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To re-iterate...I was not talking about musical styles, but the way some people chose to make bad technical decisions that made music unlistenable from a "pleasant listening experience" standpoint....and then people blamed the technology, not the people making bad decisions on how to use it.

Then again, I suppose one could say that saying a decision was "bad" is arbitrary, and there's no such thing as a "bad" decision any more than there are "stupid" questions. But, if I bought a CD and found the experience of listening to it negative because it hurt my ears, then that didn't make me happy.

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3031689 03/04/20 11:46 PM
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I guess part of my point is that some of the technical decisions are actually part of the genre. Certainly things like extreme auto tune, overwhelming bass, squashed dynamics, etc can be associated with certain styles of music and be the norm.


Dan

Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.
Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
J. Dan #3031713 03/05/20 02:43 AM
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Originally Posted by J. Dead
I guess part of my point is that some of the technical decisions are actually part of the genre. Certainly things like extreme auto tune, overwhelming bass, squashed dynamics, etc can be associated with certain styles of music and be the norm.

I agree 100%, and they can sound "right" in that context - because they are indeed part of the genre. But it's not what I expect with, for example, a Peter Gabriel album. Lords of Acid - yeah, that works for me smile

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3031729 03/05/20 04:36 AM
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Music cannot and will not be killed.

Many songs have been killed. Some of them deserve to die. :- D

Bad lyrics top my list, followed by bad singing. This is completely subjective I LOVE Lime In The Coconut and it is completely stupid.
And I do not care to hear Whitney Houston sing I Will Always Love You, to me the "acrobatic bombast" of her interpretation ruins that song completely. I hugely prefer when Dolly sings it.

The Band sound like hungover drunken hillbillies on the "brown album" but it is one of my favorites of all time. And no, Billie Holiday does not sing "flat."

I can't listen to the first Hootie and The Blowfish album, it is compressed beyond all reason and just sounds flat and nasty. It would probably be pretty OK if the mastering was not so poorly done.
There are LOTS of examples of mix and mastering crushing the beauty and the beautiless alike.

Somehow I like Katy Perry - Hot and Cold - probably because the chorus is jam-packed with every possible stupid cliche and it makes me laugh. Not a Katy Perry fan overall, don't like the singing, most of the songs and the productions.

So, I dunno what to tell you. I can tell you what I don't like but you might like it. My reasons for liking something could be completely different from somebody else's reasons for liking it and could even be exactly the same as somebody else's reasons for hating it!!!!
Too complicated, beyond my pay grade... Cheers, Kuru


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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3031734 03/05/20 05:18 AM
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These guys are unabashed technology geeks - they even provide a complete list of synths and other gear that's ridiculously long at the end of the song.

But I listen to it several times a day because the hooks they put into this song really work for me, even though I barely understand a word. So i think it's all the hooks plus an actual bridge, which I haven't heard in a pop song lately - at least not very much.


Last edited by GovernorSilver; 03/05/20 05:19 AM.
Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3034316 03/20/20 06:27 PM
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"The Most Unwanted Song" is a song created by artists Komar and Melamid and composer Dave Soldier in 1997. The song was designed to incorporate lyrical and musical elements that were annoying to most people, as determined by a public opinion survey. These elements included bagpipes, cowboy music, an opera singer rapping, and a children's choir that urged listeners to go shopping at Wal-Mart.

For The People's Choice: Music CD, "The Most Unwanted Song" was paired with "The Most Wanted Song," which incorporated musical elements that were "wanted" by listeners, again as determined by a public opinion survey. Instruments such as guitar, bass, piano and drums, and lyrics about love were "most wanted" by the survey respondents, and are included in the song, which has been described as "Celine Dion-esque".

The vocals for "The Most Wanted Song" are provided by Ada Dyer and Ronnie Gent; Living Colour guitarist Vernon Reid is featured on guitar. [Wikipedia]

In my opinion the unwanted song is listenable and the wanted song is unlistenable.




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Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3034332 03/20/20 07:43 PM
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Well again, the premise was about technology making music unlistenable, independent of the content. As to the content, I found them both hilarious.

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
Anderton #3034583 03/22/20 06:53 PM
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What killed it for me (at least rock) is when the decision was made to have all of it posess like .0005 db of dynamic range.....made it about as enjoyable as listening to a leaf blower....

Re: So What Really Made Music Unlistenable?
area51recording #3034586 03/22/20 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by area51recording
What killed it for me (at least rock) is when the decision was made to have all of it posess like .0005 db of dynamic range.....made it about as enjoyable as listening to a leaf blower....
I'm really thankful that streaming services are adhering to maintaining consistent LUFS levels, because it removes the incentive to squash the dynamic range so your music sounds "louder." Since pretty much all my music these days is on streaming services, it's great to be able to use as much or as little dynamics control as I want.

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