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Electro-Acoustic music


TaurusT

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glad for you that i'm not in the normal cnynical/sarcastic mood or i'ld say "duh... yeah all of us to some degree" but i'm assuming your doing something genre specific... define for me if you will....
"style is determined not by what you can play but what you cant...." dave brubeck
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If you mean electronic music on the 'academic' side, yeah, I've listened to a lot of it for most of my life, except for the last few years; I also have had a few works performed. Generally speaking, I like the works of William Schottstaedt, Michael McNabb, Tod Machover, Michelangelo Lupone and many others.

Among the 'historical' composers, I love Pierre Shaeffer's 'concrete music' collages, Berio's "Omaggio a Joyce", Nono's "Prometeus", Stockhausen's "Mantra", etc.

 

About my own music, here's a tune written in 2000, which has been perforned a few times around the world. It's for saxophone quartet and electronic music.

 

www.carlomezzanotte.com/mp3/Rewind.mp3

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I'm just bumping this up.

 

I know it's mainly rock, jazz and pop in these quarters, but I find it difficult to believe that none of the keyboard players here has ever had any contact with our not-too-distant cousins.

 

It's a fascinating, multi-faceted world. I personally regret not having dedicated more of my energy to it.

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hey carlo is that what he means??? i used to listen to penderecki varese' and afew others way cool stuff i thought but haven't personally done any in awhile... seems someone around here should know something about it... how about ethan winer?? pretty cool cellist...
"style is determined not by what you can play but what you cant...." dave brubeck
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Originally posted by marino:

About my own music, here's a tune written in 2000, which has been perforned a few times around the world. It's for saxophone quartet and electronic music.

 

www.carlomezzanotte.com/mp3/Rewind.mp3

Hmm, I'm not sure I'd qualify most of this exactly as 'music,' but I do like a lot of the interesting ethereal sound design there and I'm quite enjoying listening to it. Maybe there is more of a musical basis to it than I realize.
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Originally posted by soundscape:

Originally posted by marino:

About my own music, here's a tune written in 2000, which has been perforned a few times around the world. It's for saxophone quartet and electronic music.

 

www.carlomezzanotte.com/mp3/Rewind.mp3

Hmm, I'm not sure I'd qualify most of this exactly as 'music,' but I do like a lot of the interesting ethereal sound design there and I'm quite enjoying listening to it. Maybe there is more of a musical basis to it than I realize.
It is all about gestures. You have to listen this music for a long time before you start understanding it and looking past the "this is not music" part.

 

Maybe this will introduce you a bit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electroacoustic_music

 

Marino, interesting track.

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I'm always amazed by how little communication there is among the various fields of music. Yeah Soundscape, it's "music", with a tradition which starts at the beginning of the 20th century. The field is very diversified, to be sure; but I find it strange that so few musicians who are interested in electronics applied to music, are at least aware of such a rich musical field.

 

I'm not saying all Cornerers are like that, of course; but when someone, for once, asks about it and receives such an underwhelming response, it makes me think a bit.

 

So Taurus, since you started the thread - what are your favorite composers? What about your own music?

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Originally posted by marino:

I'm always amazed by how little communication there is among the various fields of music. Yeah Soundscape, it's "music", with a tradition which starts at the beginning of the 20th century.

Hmm, maybe I made a mistake by saying "I'm not sure I'd qualify most of this exactly as 'music.'" The brass parts are obviously atonal but other parts sound more like sound design to me. I am really quite interested to know what the musical structure is behind them.

 

(BTW... good sound design is supposed to be a compliment...!)

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Originally posted by soundscape:

I am really quite interested to know what the musical structure is behind them.

In this type of music, sound design and musical structure are strictly linked. Anyway, the piece is not really atonal. Allow me to explain a bit:

 

The episodes played by the saxophones are written in a very strict counterpoint. By that I don't mean baroque counterpoint, of course; I mean that the vast majority of the individual interwoven melodic lines are derived from the two melodic subjects which are presented at the beginning, plus a third one which enters in a later episode. The harmonic language is based on tonal centers, even though the 'free-flowing' rhythm of the phrases and the dense counterpoint can give the impression that it's totally atonal.

 

The elctronic parts serve three main purposes:

 

1) To connect the tonal centers of the 'acoustic' episodes. Yes, these parts aren't atonal either! (well, a few sections are pure noise, but they are the minority) The sidebands are very dense and the tonal centers are shifting rapidly, but they are present nonetheless. :)

 

2) To contrast and support the saxophones the way an orchestra would do in a 'concerto grosso';

 

3) To provide an 'ambience', a sonic bed to some of acoustic episodes, so that the sound of the saxophones is somewhat extrapolated from its usual context, and 'augmented' by the electronics.

 

Of course, I'm not expecting you to like the piece better after reading this... :) It's just an invitation to dig deeper into this kind of music; I feel that in its best expressions, it's a very pure, intense art form.

 

Let me advice on a particular piece: William Schottstaedt' "Leviathan" is a short piece derived from the manipulation of a single sample. To me, it's a wonderful example of the intensity of artistic expression which electronic music can achieve.

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I have to confess I'm more interested in texture than flurries of notes these days... I love music which is a result of accidents... one off events... chance.. theres something really exciting, romantic, sensual and heartbreaking about it... the fact it can't be easily repeated..
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Originally posted by soundscape:

]

Hmm, I'm not sure I'd qualify most of this exactly as 'music,' but I do like a lot of the interesting ethereal sound design there and I'm quite enjoying listening to it. Maybe there is more of a musical basis to it than I realize.

 

as i write this the link is about half over... and i'm diggin the hell out of it... shit eatin grin and all... makes me want to pick up pen and paper again... thank you !!! it's such a shame that our point of reference gets pigeon holed by what we play on a regular basis... obviously this is self imposed... is that an over blown soprano? or supranino?? awesome... had plenty of respect for you before but may have to recatigorize... took me back to university daze.... thank you !!!

"style is determined not by what you can play but what you cant...." dave brubeck
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Ha ha, thanks demntedchord (unless you're being sarcastic, of course :D ). I didn't mean to daze anybody, just wrote a piece of music... It's a regular sax quartet btw, soprano, alto, tenor, baritone - and yes, the glisses are written in the score with their exact duration and range. When they asked me to write the piece, I inquired what point of difficulty I could reach, and they said "don't worry" - so they asked for it in a sense. :D It's been performed quite a few times...

Anyway the electronic part was a *lot* of work. It went thru a few digital format conversions; the final version has lost a bit of warmth to my ears, but it's still OK.

 

In a sense, I'm very glad of your reaction. As I tried to say in my previous posts, we often forget that there are different musical world, and being familiar with as many of them as possible can only be healthy for our own musical growth.

Personally, I regret not having the time to write this kind of music anymore; it's a sonic world that's really dear to me.

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Wow, this is a genre I knew nothing about whatsoever, before reading this thread. Unfortunately I'm not in a place where I can listen to the link right now, but I'll have to check that out later.

 

I learn so much new stuff here! :thu:

 

--Dave

Make my funk the P-funk.

I wants to get funked up.

 

My Funk/Jam originals project: http://www.thefunkery.com/

 

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