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P120 weight


KeyMan035

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Mike,

 

As I was packing up after a gig last night, it struck me how light my P120 was at 40lbs. Not even close to a "real" grand piano.

 

The P250 does a SLIGHTLY better job at capturing the nuances of weight and mass of a real piano, but still, I'm disappointed. The P90 is, quite frankly, a joke.

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Ok..... :confused::rolleyes:

 

Weight has no effect on the sound. Your post was kind of pointless.

My Gear: Yamaha P120 Professional Stage Piano, Yamaha CS1x Synthesizer, Yamaha MSP5 Monitors, Behringer Eurorack UB802 Mixer

Music I Play: Classical, Jazz, Blues, Classic Rock, Rock

 

The Yamaha P120 Pro. Stage Piano is absolutely superb, fantastic, awesome! It rocks!

 

Chris M.

West Brook Music Studio, New England USA

Yamaha P120 Specialist

 

My Synth Group

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I've long known that nothing "captures the nuances of weight and mass of a real piano" like a real piano, especially when moving even the smallest of spinets down a flight of stairs.

 

KeyMan035 you got me ROTFL. Thanks for making my day.

 

Steve

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KeyMan - you *are* making fun of us, right?!
No, not at all Marino. It's really about keyboard appreciation.

 

It's easy to forget that for a fraction of the weight and price of a "real" grand, we have access to the best sounding digital pianos produced. EVER!

 

We can complain to people like Mike Martin how subtle product imperfections fail to accurately reproduce each and every nuance of a real grand, while failing to appreciate the incredible technology at our fingertips.

 

Keyboard manufacturers are improving upon their products every year. We should offer suggestions, but why not spend most of our time appreciating their products and making music.

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I'm glad you're so glad with your P120, but you're sure exaggerating
I didn't state that the 120 is the best digitial piano.

 

I did mean to imply, however, that digital pianos (and of course sample libraries) are better and more realistic today than they have ever been.

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The best piano samples come from sample libraries in computers, not from the P120.
I disagree.

 

Software piano's are not great IMO. Sure, some of them are good, but not great.

 

The p120 is absolutely superb. IMO it beats all of the others out there. The clarity and smoothness is superb, and so is the action. It sounds just like a piano.

 

Regards,

p120dUdE

My Gear: Yamaha P120 Professional Stage Piano, Yamaha CS1x Synthesizer, Yamaha MSP5 Monitors, Behringer Eurorack UB802 Mixer

Music I Play: Classical, Jazz, Blues, Classic Rock, Rock

 

The Yamaha P120 Pro. Stage Piano is absolutely superb, fantastic, awesome! It rocks!

 

Chris M.

West Brook Music Studio, New England USA

Yamaha P120 Specialist

 

My Synth Group

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Play a note in the bass register, or better play a consonant chord like C, A minor, whatever and hold it for a few seconds. You will hear the sound going into a loop. This is for saving memory. You won't hear this when you're working with great sample libraries, nor will you hear it on a real piano.

http://www.bobwijnen.nl

 

Hipness is not a state of mind, it's a fact of life.

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The P120 is one of the best "student" digital pianos. The P250 is the "pro" model with superior clarity and response, but the problem is that the p250 it is darn heavy for many people... so, many gigging keyboardist select the P120 to save their backs, myself included. The day Yamaha comes out with a new model that has piano sounds and a response on par with the P250 and in a 40 pound package, I'm getting one!

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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...or how about a rackmount version? I am very pleased with my current setup, and would not want to add any more keyboards. Unless it were a 76 key (A to C, simply remove the top octave and place an octave switch button on the thing!)weighted action board with the P-250 piano sound, no internal speakers (or speakers that could be removed easily) and extensive MIDI controller capacity. I´d go for that!

 

/J :D nas

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Originally posted by Analogaddict:

...or how about a rackmount version? I am very pleased with my current setup, and would not want to add any more keyboards. Unless it were a 76 key (A to C, simply remove the top octave and place an octave switch button on the thing!)weighted action board with the P-250 piano sound, no internal speakers (or speakers that could be removed easily) and extensive MIDI controller capacity. I´d go for that!

 

/J :D nas

I also would like a rack mount version of the P250. Just for the hell of it, I midied my GranTouch 1 keyboard to my P250 but the response of certain voices didn't respond the same way as the P250's keyboard. I only played a few minutes this way as the midi cable was in my walking area.

 

For example, I played (from the GT1 keyboard) the EP1 (Rhodes) voice and the hard attack part of the sample was difficult to sound; I really had to play very, very hard to hear that attack. I don't know what exactly is going on here, but a rack mount module and a midi controller might not (?) respond the same way as the married couple does. I'm sure there are ways around that, but that might be worth filing away in the back of your head just in case you run into the same thing.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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A module would not respond like playing the P250 from its own action. It would be less satisfying.

The Yamaha action is an important factor in making the P250 play the way it does. The marriage between the P action and the internal sound engine is key.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and also helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Harry spends his time teaching jazz piano online and playing solo piano gigs.

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