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Which headphones best for keyboards?


Dave Morehouse

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Originally posted by ELP71:

None...it'll hurt your ears.

Nothing has damaged my hearing more than a keyboard monitor playing at stage volume competing with guitar amps and drums. I highly recommend in-ear monitors for stage use and a good pair of enclosed headphones for studio use, along with your studio monitors.

 

k.

9 Moog things, 3 Roland things, 2 Hammond things and a computer with stuff on it

 

 

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Audio Technica ATH-M40fs provide good bang for the buck. Decent low end response and the right midrange balance.

 

They're a little bit heavy (my neck fatigues after about 30 minutes), but they're only ~$80.

 

I generally take a break every half hour or so. I don't know if this is specifically caused by the AT's, or if it is headphones in general.

 

All the best,

 

Wiggum

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Originally posted by Wiggum:

They're a little bit heavy (my neck fatigues after about 30 minutes), but they're only ~$80.

 

I generally take a break every half hour or so. I don't know if this is specifically caused by the AT's, or if it is headphones in general.

Wiggum

In fact, I like heavyer neadphones. I'm little bit embaresed but sometimes I just forget about them and stand up an try to walk away with headphones still plugd in :freak:
Fat But Fast
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Hey thanks! I'll start reading reviews and looking at specs. I don't use headphones very often prefering to use my studio monitors at low levels. I do, however, need them when recording a lead vocal track or primary acoustic guitar track to prevent bleed. I have cheapies but would like to move up to something that I can use with the keyboard also for those "out of basement practice sessions" which seem to annoy my family.

Great googly moogly!!

http://www.inthechipsproduction.com

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Originally posted by keynote:

Check out the Sennheiser HD 280PRO headphones. They are one of the best bang for the buck set of headphones around. They retail for $199 but can be purchased from GC (Guitar Center) for $99. You may be able to find them cheaper at an online retailer. Here is a Professional review of the HD 280PRO's: Sennheiser HD 280PRO Headphones Mike

I just bought myself a set of Sennheiser EH2270's, which are also mentioned in this article. I tested them back to back with the HD 280's and found the 2270's to be much more comfortable, which is important for extended use. I found the 280's quite rigid and a bit too imposing.

 

Most importantly I thought the 2270's sounded better. I was noticing quite a bit of sibilance with the 280's which is backed up in the above review: "They are slightly weighted towards the upper-mids and above." Also as mentioned in the review, the external noise rejection is excellent - that stands for both sets.

 

Good luck

 

John Scott

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Sennheiser no longer makes the EH2270's. But you can still find them at Music123.com although you will pay $50 more over the HD280PRO's.

 

And you can find the HD280PRO's for less than $99 if you shop around. I wonder why Sennheiser stopped making the EH2270's and are still producing the HD280PRO's? ;) Hummm... :D

 

Mike

Mike
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I use a set of Sennheiser HD280s. I really like these for the isolation factor, but they tend to be a bit thin for overall sound quality. I used a set of HD450s before this set & I like the sound quality of the 450s better, however, since I don't mix with headphones this is not a major factor. In conclusion, the 280s are great for generally playing, but do not use for mixing, use a set of near fields.
"I'm not a monkey anymore..."
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Originally posted by Dog Tales:

In conclusion, the 280s are great for generally playing, but do not use for mixing, use a set of near fields.

I agree. You should use near fields for Mixing. Definitely. But it goes without saying that your near fields should be "quality" flat frequency response Monitors or you're virtually in the same boat if you Mix. But for the sheer enjoyment of listening to yourself play or listening to .mp3's, CD's, Samples, Midi's, or your Vocals through a set of HD280PRO's it would be hard to find an equal (bang for buck) to them IMO.

 

Mike

Mike
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i'm using BeyerDynamic 770. So much detail and extended bass range that it's sick. Indispensable when doing some crossfading and precision audio editing - comping vocal takes, looping, cleaning breath and other stuff from vocal tracks...

It reveals many things that don't come out on nearfields.Also, i like to check panning and stuff on them, every once in a while during mix on nearfields.

http://www.babic.com - music for film/theatre, audio-post
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