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Which is the best workstation (forget about value for money)?


earthdan

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The one that your ears likes the best.

 

I'm serious.

 

I feel it very safe to say that by and large you can't go wrong with any of the three products that you listed - they're all outstanding pieces of equipment, and all of them are among the best in their class.

 

I firmly believe that the best and only truly reliable way to make a choice like this is to spend as much time as is necessary playing with all three. See which one you think has the best feeling keybed. See which one's OS makes the most sense to you without having to read the book. If possible, download and peruse parts of the manuals to get a feel for how intuitive they are to navigate. So what if this takes a few weeks, or more - hey, you're about to invest thousands of dollars...it's probably worth taking your time.

 

However, I definitely think that the most important thing to check out is which one sounds the best to you. Which one makes you want to write music? Which machine's programs do you find "draw you in"? Which one's samples and programs sound the most like what you're looking for?

 

It's a good bet that at least one will grab you more than the others - get that one.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

 

Affiliations: Cloud Microphones • Music Player Network 

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Originally posted by earthdan:

Anyone have any ideas about which would be best for film/commercial work...if any?

 

Go try all of 'em. Play, try, feel, look, smell, think and play again, take your time, try to edit some parts, ask the sales guy his balls off, use a PA instead of crappy headphones and most of all LISTEN!

Either Motif, Triton, Fantom or K2600... they're all burnin'.

http://www.bobwijnen.nl

 

Hipness is not a state of mind, it's a fact of life.

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In my order of preference:

 

1. Triton Studio 88 (the new Triton not the old one)

2. Motif 8

3. K-2600AES

4. Fantom

5. Karma

6. PSR 9000 Pro

 

I have all of these (old Triton for now 'til the new one comes) and I would give the nod to the Motif 8 right now and put my Triton 3rd behind the Kurzweil, but with the piano ROM, CD burner and all the expansions of the new Triton Studio, that will take top honors in my book.

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Originally posted by earthdan:

Anyone have any ideas about which would be best for film/commercial work...if any?

 

I think GigaStudio is the best answer with a PC and controller keyboard. That's the ultimate film scoring workstation in my mind.

 

For film scoring with a keyboard workstation, I'd choose the K-2600 for now, but when the Triton Studio comes out and you get a halfway decent piano with all the other great Triton sounds, I think that will be the one.

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Originally posted by R:

 

For film scoring with a keyboard workstation, I'd choose the K-2600 for now, but when the Triton Studio comes out and you get a halfway decent piano with all the other great Triton sounds, I think that will be the one.

 

Why not just buy the original Triton, and install the new piano expansion board when it comes out (around the same time as Triton Studio)? It'll be much cheaper and you'll get the same sounds. Why would you need a cd burner in your keyboard anyway?

 

Chris

 

[ 02-03-2002: Message edited by: Chris100 ]

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Originally posted by earthdan:

Anyone have any ideas about which would be best for film/commercial work...if any?

 

I second dB's idea. Buy an instrument because of the way it SOUNDS. If you don't like the way it sounds, you'll never appreciate the "bells and whistles," anyway.

 

As far as film scoring goes, I don't think anyone relies solely on a single instrument these days. If you're going to buy multiple pieces of gear, it's nice to mix gear from different manufacturers.

The Black Knight always triumphs!

 

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Is the Motif 8 hammer action? I tried one in a store a few months ago and it felt more like synth action.

 

It uses Yamaha's Graded Hammer Action - which gives a lighter response in the upper registers, and a heavier response in the lower registers.

 

I'll have to chime in and agree with the others who recommend spending time with each and finding which one strikes a chord with you. I've always thought of it like Accords and Camrys. Both good cars, both do what they're supposed to, both popular and priced about the same. But there are die-hard Accord fans and die-hard Camry fans, for whatever reason.

 

Some people like Yamahas, some Rolands, some Kurzweil or Korg - not because of the specs, but because they just plain like 'em. Having them explain why is about as easy as having someone explain why they prefer blondes or brunettes...

 

Play them all - then go with your gut.

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If you are going with only one then Kurzweil 2600 may be the best bet because of the sample library. Like someone said, GigaStudio may now be the best solution for film scoring if you have a couple of computers and feel comfortable with a high end software package for sequencing and sound files.
This post edited for speling.
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It uses Yamaha's Graded Hammer Action - which gives a lighter response in the upper registers, and a heavier response in the lower registers.

 

Actually, I'm pretty sure it uses the balanced hammer action similar (but better IMHO) to the S80 action because "people didn't like playing non-piano parts on the graded action" (Yammy paraphrase). The graded action can be found in the P series of instruments.

 

 

-Casey

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Actually, I'm pretty sure it uses the balanced hammer action

 

Good catch. It is a Balanced Hammer Effect keyboard after all. According to Yamaha:

 

"True piano players can appreciate playing on a synthesizer with realistic hammer action. Yet, conventional weighted keyboards, although ideal for piano sounds, are not practical for playing voices such as drums and basses because the lower keys generally have a heavier touch. The MOTIF8's Balanced Hammer Effect keyboard, however, has been specially designed to accommodate the need for both weighted feel and quick response across the entire length of the keyboard, so you can enjoy smooth keyobard action regardless of which voice you play."

 

The MOTIF6 & MOTIF7 both use a Yamaha synth-weighted keyboard.

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Originally posted by Chris100:

 

Why not just buy the original Triton, and install the new piano expansion board when it comes out (around the same time as Triton Studio)? It'll be much cheaper and you'll get the same sounds. Why would you need a cd burner in your keyboard anyway?

 

Chris

 

Yes, that would work too. The CD burner is optional in the Triton Studio. You might like having it to use the Triton Studio as, well, a studio. That way, you have CD burning for a finished CD all built in to one instrument as a complete solution. The original Triton with a Piano ROM would work, but I like the ability to have all those extra expansion slots for more cards in there and I like the idea of the CD burner built right in for a complete solution.

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