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NAMM GEAR WE WANT TO KNOW ABOUT


Max Ventura

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Whomever went to Namm please tell us about the following novelties:

-Yamaha RS-7000 groovebox

-Yamaha AN-200 & DX-200 synths

-Yamaha 9000 Pro workstation

-Korg Karma

-Roland RS keyboards

-Roland VS-2480 V-studio

 

and anybody else who wants to know about some specific item please ask too.

 

Thankyouverymuchladiesandgentlemen.

Max Ventura, Italy.
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What about the AirSynth???? I just don't get it...... how can you actually "play" anything on it???? Can you control the pitch??? And why only 50 sounds? Isn't DB an Alesis guy? maybe he can explain it

 

------------------

John 3:16 For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son; that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

 

p.s. Is there a demo video for it anywhere???

 

 

 

This message has been edited by KeyboardFreak on 01-24-2001 at 02:11 PM

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Originally posted by KeyboardFreak:

What about the AirSynth???? I just don't get it...... how can you actually "play" anything on it???? Can you control the pitch??? And why only 50 sounds? Isn't DB an Alesis guy? maybe he can explain it

 

I am not an Alesis guy. I used to work for them; but, apart from still being on the Andromeda beta team and having some friends who still work there, I am no longer associated with them.

 

I didn't go see the AirSynth; but, from what I understand about it, besides being a different color it is exactly the same thing as the AirFX in every way. The difference is that all 50 of its programs generate sound, where only a few of the presets in the AirFX do.

 

I believe one of the inspirations for AirSynth may have actually been Mr. Anderton, who was taken by the Theremin-like control when he found AirFX at AES, and suggested that Alesis should make one that did nothing but generate sound.

 

As to how can you actually play anything on it, it is similar to using a Theremin - you can either use it as a sound effect, or you can practice a lot and hope to gain a reasonable amount of control over it. If you've ever seen a video of Clara Rockmore performing on a Theremin, it is simply unbelievable to watch - she makes the thing sing like a voice. It is unreal to me how she could just step up to this thing and hit concert pitch on any note that she chose.

 

Perhaps forum member Steadyb (who is currently an Alesis employee) can tell us more about it.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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I spent a bit of time playing with the Korg Karma. I'm not sure that I can offer up a comprehensive explanation, but I'd be delighted to share my impression

 

Basically, it is the sound generating engine of the Triton with a smaller non-touch screen display. It is missing sampling and a few of Triton's other bells and whistles. It contains a bunch of software algorithms designed by a brilliant man named Steven Kay, which allow for some amazingly complex and very cool patterns and performance techniques to be generated. The algorithms are not programmable, but there's well over 1,000 of them on board (if I remember correctly) and there's space in the unit's memory for more to be loaded in at a later date. Interactive, frighteningly complex arpeggios and layer crossfades, sound shifting, insane realtime interactive control over envelopes, filters, and many other parameters - this is only the tip of the iceberg. It is quite difficult to explain - a demo is worth a thousand words.

 

I think that the marriage of Steven's Karma software with the Triton engine is a really good fit. The thing sounds really cool, and quite different from anything else ever brought to market. However, I feel that it is definitely not an instrument for beginners. Most of the tricks that I saw Steven doing with it were very cool, but I was very aware that I was watching the inventor demo his own invention. I sat and played with one for a short time; and, while I enjoyed playing with it, I came to the conclusion that more than a modicum of shed time would definitely be required in order to get a handle on it . The Karma appeared to me to be only as good as the instructions that it receives, and the real-time control that the algorithms give the end-user over the programs did not appear as intuitive to me as I might have liked. It definitely requires a shift in thinking from traditional keyboard instruments.

 

I must say that I really liked the industrial design of the instrument - especially the flip-up compartment on the top panel that allows for user installation of up to two of the Triton's expansion boards. It is a fine looking synth, and I would be interested to own one some day.

 

It is my hope that the Karma does well, and doesn't fall into that category of Korg keyboards such as the Wavestation and the Z1 - really cool axes that don't go anywhere because people just don't get it. I imagine that a decent amount of its success hinges on whether or not Korg comes up with an effective method to teach the guys in the music stores how to explain and demo it - much more so than the average synth. I do imagine that there are people who will buy it just because it costs less than the Triton (Karma is only $2250 MSRP, and I believe the Triton's MSRP is $2800) and it's a very cool shade of cranberry.

 

I would be most eager to hear other impressions of this instrument.

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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Some of the best stuff at NAMM can be found down in Hall E, which is actually under Hall D. Frank Wells from Pro Sound News pointed me towards a booth manned by a company called Funk Logic. They make these way way cool rack panel fillers that look like real gear, except the nomenclature on the front panel is pretty warped.

 

I bought two - the Valvecaster 1960 Dual Valve Teleknobic Preampulator, and the DD-301 Digilog Dynamicator. I was also quite drawn to the Palindrometer... http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

 

Too cool...check 'em out!

http://www.funklogic.com

 

dB

:snax:

 

:keys:==> David Bryce Music • Funky Young Monks <==:rawk:

 

Professional Affiliations: Royer LabsMusic Player Network

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Originally posted by KeyboardFreak:

What about the AirSynth???? I just don't get it...... how can you actually "play" anything on it???? Can you control the pitch??? And why only 50 sounds? Isn't DB an Alesis guy? maybe he can explain it

------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

I am not an Alesis guy. I used to work for them; but, apart from still being on the Andromeda beta team and having some friends who still work there, I am no longer associated with them.

 

I didn't go see the AirSynth; but, from what I understand about it, besides being a different color it is exactly the same thing as the AirFX in every way. The difference is that all 50 of its programs generate sound, where only a few of the presets in the AirFX do.

 

I believe one of the inspirations for AirSynth may have actually been Mr. Anderton, who was taken by the Theremin-like control when he found AirFX at AES, and suggested that Alesis should make one that did nothing but generate sound.

 

As to how can you actually play anything on it, it is similar to using a Theremin - you can either use it as a sound effect, or you can practice a lot and hope to gain a reasonable amount of control over it. If you've ever seen a video of Clara Rockmore performing on a Theremin, it is simply unbelievable to watch - she makes the thing sing like a voice. It is unreal to me how she could just step up to this thing and hit concert pitch on any note that she chose.

 

Perhaps forum member Steadyb (who is currently an Alesis employee) can tell us more about it.

 

dB

 

The AirSynth you saw at the show was a prototype, with presets that were programmed at the eleventh hour right before the show. There will be a more finalized set of sounds in the next few weeks, and I'm sure, like the theramin those who are willing to spend the time will master it and do some very cool things. Also, at $249 list, it's meant to be fun for grown ups and kids alike.

steadyb

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Wow, wasn't anyone here interested in the =five= analog modular synthesizer manufacturers that were displaying gear? Technosaurus, Analog Solutions, Analog Systems, Encore Electronics and Synthesis Technology all had working systems for audition and purchase. Here's the news:

http://members.home.net/odysseysounds/namm.htm

Give me the ANALOG and no one gets HURT
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I really liked the Korg Karma, though I don't have much to add other than what dB already said. The demo was great, and I think they did an amazing job with the preset arpeggiator patterns. Does anyone know expected ship date? I might start saving my pennies...about 200,000 of them, I guess.

 

- Jeff

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I also heard that Roland will come out a new keyboard amp called KC-1000. It suppose to have (3) Hi-Fi inputs and (1) COSM input to simulate the tube amp. I'm not sure is this true. Sounds like Roland wants to have a head-on competation with Motion Sounds...
Hooked on Keys...
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The KC-1000 looks stupid to me.. it's so expensive, and it's still not stereo on its own, unlike the KBR-3D.

 

Regarding Karma, this is the first synthesizer with interactive/backing features that I am interested in. It looks like Korg finally graduated from the x and i series and made something that professional musicians can play without feeling insulted. this is not to say that everyone feels like they can make their own arrangements in every style available, but I've always felt like keyboards with "styles" like the Roland G series are more obstacles to the creative process than they are helpers. But Karma takes a different turn, something that I would really enjoy playing live and its design is quite attractive. It's amazing that everyone else is making silver keyboards now and Korg decided to go colored..

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Yeah, the Roland amps are always overpriced.. there is no suprise this time also.

As for the Nord Clavia, I was expecting to see it in NAMM, but they are only showing the case. Well it may be ready by this summer I guess.

 

The Nordlead 3 looks impressive with all the led's on the knobs, it sure looks nice !

 

------------------

Hooked on Keys...

Hooked on Keys...
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Apart from almost everybody else, I am not the least interested in the Korg Karma:

don't misunderstand me, bu I've already understood what it is, it's as stiff as most Korg products above the Electribe Range.

Like the Triton, Trinity, N-series, MS-2000 and expecially Z-1, it's probably got interesting factory sounds, but the interactivity with it is at a very low level. Korg does provide realtime control sometimes, but it is always of the most un-cooperative type. I am a dealer, and I tell you that Z-1, MS-2000, N's and Tritons are among the most sold-off keyboards ever, and everybody who trades those axes to my store mentions the word "un-cooperative" referring to them.

Once dave said the Karma's patterns were not programmable it was like the kiss of death.

Max Ventura, Italy.
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