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How often do you folks exchange your hardware?


sidereal

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I think I'm due.

 

It's like cleaning the bathroom kind of. Slowly you start to notice that dingy thing happening and you know it's time to clean house. I need it all: new stands, new hat pedal, new tom mount. Bummer to do it all at once, shell out 300-500 bucks on something you already have really.

 

Anyway, just bitching. But how often do you all do it? Every 6 months or so? Know where to get some good prices online with decent shipping costs?

Just for the record.
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I havn't had to replace my yamaha hardware yet.

 

I have managed to salvage one of my tama double braced stands from the 80's. It is kinda messed up though...the threads are weak-I need pliers to tighten it down.

 

That is the only time I replace it, when the threads go...usually the rivets in the tripods hold well in the more modern stuff.

 

ciao

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Alright Sidereal:

 

Time for a tongue lashing on hardware maintenance.

 

My philosophy (and this goes for bathroom cleaning as well) is to maintain as you go! I always wipe my hardware down after a gig!

 

Although I have past the point (fortunately) of playing smokey bars, when I did ... I always wiped the hardware, drums and cymbals down that night or the next morning. Use a mild cleaner or "quik-wax" automotive spray product. Also, you can use a oily rag on the hardware for protection against rust (if you live in a rust prone area). I suggest a light coat of "3-in-1" oil or WD-40.

 

I have never had to replace hardware for reasons of wearing out. I only replace when ... say ... I go from my "rack-phase" to standard hardware-phase! More for reasons of a change of pace!

 

Drums are a big ticket investment. Take care of your gear!

 

DJ

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Amen dj,

You see guitarists wipe their axes down after barely handling them.It sickens me to see a drum kit with rust and crap imbedded in cracks and crevasses.I admit we have a bit more to clean but my God man you shouldn't let it get to that point.Play It! Love It! Clean It!!!

ian*

ian*
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I rarely have to replace hardware; if I do it's only from wear ... like a stripped out thread that is unfixable.

 

LISTEN UP!!!

 

What I am about to share with you is such a gold mine ... I wish I had thought of it so I could market the snot out of it! LOL

 

Do want to clean your hardware and prevent the chrome from pitting? The oils from your hands as well as smoke is enough to ruin the chrome plating on your stands over a short period of time.

 

Are you ready? Here's what you need!

 

1) CINCH all-purpose cleaner

2) #0000 Steel Wool

3) 100% Cotton Cloth (clean)

 

All you do is spray a little Cinch on the steel wool and lightly scrub down the hardware. When you are done, simply wipe down the hardware with the cotton cloth; you can use an old t-shirt as long as it's clean. I don't really recommend spraying the Cinch directly onto the hardware. Save from waste and spray directly (at close range) onto the steel wool.

 

This is the most cost effective way to keep your drums looking great; lasting for years and years.

 

The #0000 Steel Wool will not scratch the plating on your stands, but it's strong enough to remove dirt, oils, stains and anything else that may have been slattered on you at your last gig.

 

Every year, I take my YAMAHA Recording Customs (c. 1985) and strip them down to bare shells. I clean all of the drum lugs & hardware as well as all the stands. People are amazed when I tell them that my kit, with the Piano Black finish, is over 15 years old.

 

WARNING: DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CLEAN THE LUGS WHILE THEY ARE STILL ON THE DRUM. THE STEEL WOOL WILL SCRATCH YOUR FINISH; DON'T TAKE CHANCES!!!

 

Another nice reason to strip the drums down is that I can check for any worn parts that may need replacing. The last thing I want is a lug screw to back out and be bouncing around inside my drum while I'm in a recording session. I'm also able to check for any weird vibrating parts.

 

Let me know how it works for you!

 

 

------------------

Bart Elliott

http://bartelliott.com

Drummer Cafe - community drum & percussion forum
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I throw my hardware all over the stage, drop it from high places, strip all the threads, throw it all in the trunk and leave it there. My drums, however, are completely polished, unblemished in any way, and have been in impecable condition for close to 10 years now. The drums.... I'm right with ya. But I was always under the impression hardware was disposable after a while. I'm amazed you have had your same hardware for the life of your kit. But OK, thanks, that's why this forum is cool. I'll take better care of the new batch.
Just for the record.
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I just hate spending money on new hardware ... I'd rather spend it on a new instrument ... you know?

 

I understand your thoughts about your hardware being "disposable". It takes a lot of extra effort to protect your stands and such, and sometimes players just don't have the time to mess with it, etc.

 

I throw my stands into my road cases and hardware cases all the time, and it has held up just fine.

 

Maybe I should mention that the kit I'm talking about is a Yamaha Recording Custom kit with 900 series hardware. This hardware is HEAVY stuff; double braced (not like the double braced stuff now days which is lighter). The stands were designed to stay in one place; the studio. It's nuts to haul this much weight ... but I must say that I've never had a problem with stands blowing over when performing outdoors! http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

 

On a personal note, I don't buy anything anymore unless I have the money to pay cash. Being debt free is a WONDERFUL thing ... I highly recommend the life style. Anyway, being that I have taken good care of what I DO have, I've been able to buy a lot more "toys". Have a look at my Equipment List on my web site. If my baby son decides to play drums/percussion ... he'll have it made in the shade!!!

 

Peace.

 

 

 

------------------

Bart Elliott

http://bartelliott.com

Drummer Cafe - community drum & percussion forum
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Originally posted by djarrett:

This CINCH ... is this a Texas product ... or what?

Never heard of it before!

 

 

CINCH is made by Spic & Span.

I know it's availabe in Tennessee because found out about it when I was living in Chattanooga in the mid 90's.

 

I just recommend that you don't apply it directly to what it is you are wanting to clean. Spray it directly onto the steel wool for extra protection and to prevent from using too much. If you are using it on the piano/keyboard keys, like Felix says he does, I would spray it on a soft cotton cloth and then use the cloth to wipe down what you need to clean.

 

 

 

------------------

Bart Elliott

http://bartelliott.com

Drummer Cafe - community drum & percussion forum
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