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Classical music


thanny XIII

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does anyone ( this is geared more toward rock players) listen to such composers as shastikovitch, bach, mozart, mahler,or traikosky?

i do and it has helped my music not to suck and i find it enjoyable. I take my g****r player to it ocassionally because my dad has comps. Yay.

I knew a girl that was into biamping,I sure do miss

her.-ButcherNburn

 

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Hey T13, yeah, that's a great idea! I've been a proponent for going to see local, live symphonic performances on these forums for a while now. I started off playing rock, classical and jazz at about the same time as a kid, so I don't quite fall in your question's demographic.

 

Music is melody, harmony, rhythm and dynamics. It is this last component that is all too often sorely missing from popular music these days, or trivialized into "loud" versus "louder". It's great to hear an sfp sforzando/piano followed by a slow crescendo, for example.

 

In addition, there are some neat things you can do with a 100-piece orchestra that you just can't do with 100 guitar overdubs. I especially appreciate the various textures available by combining various instruments in different ways, say pairing the oboe and 1st chair flute. You can hear some neat orchestral-type arrangements in JPJ's work (both solo and in collaboration).

 

However, I caution against seeing a symphony play jazz standards, as their familiarity with the idiom is usually lacking. (You'll have a much better time listening to the local college jazz band or small jazz ensemble instead.)

 

If you're a musician, you owe it to yourself to at least be familiar with all kinds of music. The Beatles went to Inda, and Led Zeppelin took us to "Kashmir". There's a whole world of music out there to discover.

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Not only do I attend classical performances; I'm the principal bass of the New Philharmonic Orchestra of Irving.

 

Did you mean Tchaikovsky? Sure you did.

 

I also went to the Grand Ole Opry last week. I ate dinner at 2 resturants last week; an Irish pub with a duo: guitar and harp and the Casey Jones Station Buffet in Jackson, Tennessee with an acoustic bluegrass band. I attended a choral concert and a jazz concert last month. I saw dozens of performances of classical music at the TMEA convention in February.

 

Next week, I'll be judging junior and senior high school orchestras for 2 days in Central Texas. Last night, I bought a CD of the country flavored, bass-voiced Ray Scott.

 

I guess my point is that there is so much music worthy of listening too, and so much you can learn from it all.

 

In addition to dynamics in an orchestral performance, I listen to develop a consciousness of form and melody. Also, the harmonic exploration in Classical music is profound.

Yep. I'm the other voice in the head of davebrownbass.
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And just this weekend I started looking at Beethoven, Mozart (wolfgang and leopold), Pachelbel, Handel, Tchaikovsky and Liszt sheet music.

I didnt buy anything, just looked at it. dont think i'm quite up to transposing yet. probably could just take me forever and a day :) then I found My Sheet Music and now I dont need to transcribe or worry over changing keys :)

 

Too bad I dont have a printer. Really jonesing to play some of that

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I'm a big fan of Bartok, Mozart, Beethoven, Stockhausen, Verese, and Stravinsky.

 

My girlfriend is an opera singer, so I'm also continually exposed to lots of Verdi, Bizet, etc. I get a kick out of playing a duet with her singing the lead to the Habanera with me playing the bassline. Fun. :D

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I heard the Chicago Symphony play Bartok's "Concerto for Orchestra" live last year when we did a band/orchestra trip to Chicago. Incredible.

 

One thing I forgot to say, and maybe the most special thing. In rehearsal and in concert, if you are playing classical music, you have a very unique vantage point to hear the music in it's component parts. A rare opportunity indeed.

Yep. I'm the other voice in the head of davebrownbass.
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I happen to be a big fan of Maurice Ravel. Coincidentally there was a string quartet at the venue I work at tonight and they played his String Quartet in F Major. Such a treat. Ravel, being a more modern, is quite a bit more "progressive" to my ears. Any bass player that incorporates that level of creativity and adventure in their lines would have a fan in me for sure.
Never follow children, animals or Hare Krishnas!!
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Sure I do! I was into "orchestral" music (the term "classical" is a misnomer, and the term "classical" refers to the relatively short "classical period" of orchestral composition--roughly from the time of the rise of Mozart in circa

1750 to about the death of Beethoven in 1827. The classical period was preceeded by the Baroque period and followed by the Romantic period) and jazz long before I got into any other styles of music.

 

For fun I actually "read" scores of orchestral music as others might read a novel. I recently finished a complete orchestral folio of Stravinsky's "Le Sacre du Printemps" and am currently reading thru a score for Messiaen's "Quartet For The End Of Time".

 

And later this month I am playing with the LA Philharomonic for a performance....BTW, orchestral Double Bass is the single-most demanding (mentally and physically) instrument I have ever played. I have the utmost respect and admiration for Dave Brown......

 

Max

...it's not the arrow, it's the Indian.
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Debussy, Mahler, Samuelson, Holst, Copeland, Ravel, Hindemith, even the 3 Bs - it's all good! If fact the last cd I purchased was Edgar Meyer doing the first 3 unaccompanied Bach cello sonatas.
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Yeah!

Bartok (my favourite), Ravel, Debussy, Satie, Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Saint-Saens . . .

Good music is good music.

I was lucky enough to play in a fusion group witha Bartok influenced leader. We had one tune that was based on the golden mean-fibonacci style. We did some serial stuff too.

Living in London there's lots of opportunity to see great orchestral stuff cheap or free. I sometimes just go to see those guys rehearse.

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I definitely enjoy classical music a lot, and enjoy working on pieces or sections of pieces on guitar and mandolin - such as things from the Bach violin concertos.

 

By the way, some of those guys had great bass lines (especially Bach) and if you know to read, you can learn a lot from them - they are interesting in their own right but fit perfectly in context.

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Thanks, Max.

 

I even used to be good at it! :D

 

In all honesty, to just stay current requires 45 minutes of warmup daily, which I have not been able to do for about 10 years.

 

As a result, I'm not the player I once was. I can still play 80-90% of the music I encounter, but that tough 10%...Wow!

 

A big challenge is tuning. It is very difficult to hear yourself as you play in an orchestra. As I get older and my hearing worsens, I have less confidence in my positions.

 

Some of my most worshipful moments have been behind a bass in an orchestra, though. It's incredibly moving.

 

LA Phil, eh? I know who has my utmost respect, Max. What are you playing?

Yep. I'm the other voice in the head of davebrownbass.
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No one's mentioned Ron Carter's album of the Bach cello suites transcribed for doghouse? WOW. That Bach, he sure knew how to rock the bottom end!

 

And speaking of Stravinsky, he invented heavy metal in 1913 with "The Rite Of Spring." Tell me you don't hear some proto-Sabbath in that famous chunk-chunk-chunk-chunk low strings entrance. (It's been too long since college; I don't remember which movement that's in.)

"I had to have something, and it wasn't there. I couldn't go down the street and buy it, so I built it."

 

Les Paul

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I am a big fan of Sibelius. Check out his sypmphonies 2, 5, and 7. Also the various tone poems.

 

I use Grieg's Hall of the Mountain King from the Peer Gynt Suite as a bass finger exercise, not the bass line, but the main melody. You can find it on most tab sites. Also Beethoven's Ode to Joy theme is another fun one.

 

Guy

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  • 2 weeks later...

man, classical music was how i got to play bass. it all started 5 years ago in a 6th grade beginning string orchestra, and i decided to play the string bass because it was really big and awesome. it all started with some simple little classical melodies, which then escalated to concertos, and then to film scores. that transitioned to the electric bass, and i started playing bass lines from popular songs. now i'm at the point where i play almost every other genre there could be and make up my own music. for my career, i want to be a professional rock/jazz/funk/etc. bass player and/or a classical composer.

 

and now you have my story on how i picked up playing bass.

"Of all noises, I think music is the least disagreeable." -Samuel Johnson

 

"To stop the flow of music would be like the stopping of time itself, incredible and inconceivable." -Aaron Copland

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Since this thread started, I have been raiding the iTunes music store. Thanks, thannyXIII :mad:

 

Yeah Dave, a 45 minutes to an hour is just about a long enough warm up for me to not butcher a show. Without the warm up, it seems as though the bass won't even speak. I was beginning to think there was something wrong with me.

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I was raised on "Classical" music and big band movie sound tracks (My mom was big on Percy Faith and Henry Mancini, Shirly Basie's voice still send shivers up my spine!).

 

I took piano lessons for several years so Verdi and a few others got in there.

 

My first bass teacher introduced me to Jaco and Fusion jazz.

 

I played doublebass in High School and particularly loved playing Bach's Brandenburg Concertos.

 

My first attempt at college was as a music major. My instrument was pipe organ(that didn't work out, but it sure was cool! Still my favorite instrument). Music history was a part of my cirriculum, It exposed me to Gregorian Chant (love it!) and Medieval era music.

 

I have been involved in Medieval re-creation for 16 years. This has deepen my awareness and appreciation for the music of that era.

 

Thanny, music is a vast ocean. Stick your oars in and get to paddling! :D:thu:

 

Godspeed!

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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Dear All,

 

Anybody interested in some excellent classical and jazz double bass action should check out Hungarain bassist Aladár Pege. He is good.

Check at Allmusic.

 

I've seen him live more than once and he continues to amaze me every time. Don't get any of his electric bass stuff though, they're not worth it.

 

Not too many titles available at Amazon...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=br_ss_hs/103-6224315-0797460?search-alias=aps&keywords=aladar%20pege

 

cheers

Warwick Streamer Jazzman 5, Fernandes LEB-2

Ashdown ABM-300, Ashdown ABM 4x10

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Add Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky ("Pictures At An Exhibition") and Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff ("Piano Concerto No. 2") to your collection.

 

For those who think I'm a Russian sympathizer (please note both of these composers produced the body of their works prior to 1917) I also heartily recommend Aaron Copland ("Fanfare for the Common Man" and "Hoedown").

 

Of course, the Emerson, Lake & Palmer versions aren't that bad either; they garnished great reviews when they were released in a few classical magazines.

(yes, I know ELP never covered Rachmaninoff, but don't let that stop you) :wave:

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I'm a Lizst and Chopin junky. I cut my teeth on classical piano, then did 5+ years in concert band on various woodwinds and percussion. My only regret is that I've only once or twice been able to play in a full orchestra. One of these days when I decide I have the time I'll join a community orchestra, I think.

 

I keep reminding myself that I need to be as informed about classical as I am about classic rock, but all things in time. :)

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I had an absolutely FANTASTIC elementary school music teacher. Every year at Halloween, she would take us all in the auditorium, turn out the lights, and play for us a recording of Saint-Saens Danse Macabre while showing a film-strip that illustrated the story in the music. It was one of those defining events in a young persons life. I had no real exposure to orchestral music other than what she provided, and I am still a fan to this day.

 

Paganini

Beethoven

Ravel (yes, Ms. Derek, Bolero is the best music to have sex to)

Rimsky-Korsakov

Bach

Copeland

Mozart

Mussorgsky

just to name a very few

My whole trick is to keep the tune well out in front. If I play Tchaikovsky, I play his melodies and skip his spiritual struggle. ~Liberace
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