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do YOU play classic rock?


cloclo

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Yep, I am currently playing in a classic rock band.

 

It is interesting to see the same thing that has happened to orchestral music and jazz happening to rock.

 

It is also interesting to see the opposite happen to Country&Western, especially since it has been around longer that rock music. Around here, most CW bands have to stay up on all the current "Top 40" stuff. They incorporate very little to none of the "classic country" songs into their sets. The CW crowd is all about dancin' to the latest hits.

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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For me, there are times when all I want to do is chill with some buddies and play and sing (poorly generally) some classics by the Dead, Dylan, The Band or CCR (the real one)or something like that.

 

The chance to back off on my concentration on playing tough bass material and think about the song's lyrics, form and general emotional content is very cathartic and educational.

 

Furthermore, rarely am I in a band that I don't cover a classic rock tune if it's a rock or R&B gig; or do an interpretation of one for a jazz gig.

 

As it was aptly stated before, "Classic rock will never die." (Though some may hope so)

Never follow children, animals or Hare Krishnas!!
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I did, up until this weekend when my band called it a day. I still do at home, but I don't have a new gig yet, although I'm trying for a few big ones, so all of your thoughts and positive vibes are needed, especially in Rita comes this way, as they're predicting. But, let's not turn this into a weather thread.
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I've learned a few (emphasis on the "few") classic rock bass lines but I've never (emphasis on the "never") played any classic rock tunes in a band. I've figured out a few more from listening to them on the radio but I've never even played them in my room (emphasis on the "room"). :freak:
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If I had to clasify the original band that I currently play in, I would say it's a mix between Led Zeppelin, Allman Brothers, and the Black Crows; just with a modern twist on it (and a lead guitar player who is stuck in 1987). So, I guess we play classic rock. I constantly find myself referring back to Led Zep, The Who, Yes, Rush, etc... to find inspiration in my basslines and what the song wants to have as a bassline. Which sort of warrents a thread... I'll start one and put my thoughts there about the "what the song wants".
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Originally posted by C.Alexander Claber:

Originally posted by Bumpcity:

(and a lead guitar player who is stuck in 1987).

Indeed. It's like a disease!

 

Alex

Oh my. You have no idea... Our lead guitarist got banned from the mixing sessions because of various things which stem from this fact... and that he doesn't have any idea what sounds good. But I digress. It's a long story. A long, long story that has cost me and the rest of the band a lot of money on this project. Thankfully we're moving forward and this album is finally almost done.
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I am from the "classic rock" generation - before the leather pants thing, when everyone wore jeans or outrageous fancy clothes (Seinfeld's puffy shirt had nothing on some of the stuff I wore).

 

While I play in church and sometimes play acoustically-based music (some of which is also classic), it's classic rock for me. My band recorded a demo in May that reads like a radio playlist.

 

It is interesting to note that "classic rock" is a huge and diverse thing. My band does not do material by many of the "main" classic rock bands.

 

I would be at home in an Elvis Costello band (I guess he's partially classic) or a Weezer band, but it was easier getting this together.

 

My daughter refers to us as an "old man band", and she's right.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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The last band I played in did a lot of classic rock, new rock and alternative rock. The new project I'm working on has some classic rock in it but done acoustically. It is strange for me to hear radio stations calling music from the 80's and early 90's classic rock. I had always thought of it being from the 60s, 70s and early 80s but time moves on. Soon that will be called oldies. I guess that it is all relative. when I was 20, 40 seemed old. Now that I'm 35, 40 does not seem so old after all.
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Originally posted by C.Alexander Claber:

Originally posted by Bumpcity:

(and a lead guitar player who is stuck in 1987).

Indeed. It's like a disease!

 

Alex

I was in a band with myself and another late 30's guitarist plus a drummer and singer in their early 20's. It was ALWAYS a battle to get the guitardist (my brother-in-law) to play anything from the ninties and on. One of my fav conversations went like this:

 

Tony: "Let's play "XXXX" by Boston"

 

Me: "No, we need to learn more modern songs, we already play 4 Boston songs. We have twice as many old songs as modern."

 

Tony: "XXXX" isn't old! It's a GREAT song! :mad:

 

Me: "I didn't say it wasn't great, it's just old."

 

Tony: "No, it's a great song!" :mad:

 

Me, turning to drummer "Jeremy, how old were you in (Boston album release date)?

 

Jeremy: "Two"

 

Me: "Tony, the new definition of an old song is any song released before your drummer was 3." :mad:

 

:D

You can stop now -jeremyc

STOP QUOTING EVERY THING I SAY!!! -Bass_god_offspring

lug, you should add that statement to you signature.-Tenstrum

I'm not sure any argument can top lug's. - Sweet Willie

 

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Originally posted by RicBassGuy:

Originally posted by DONUT:

[...] My pants are RED leather. [...]

If those are the ones The Romantics used to wear, my wife wants them. :P:rolleyes:

 

Evidently, at the end of a tour they threw them out into the audience and haven't heard from them since.

I bought mine at a Romantics estate sale. Its what I like about them that makes me talk in my sleep.
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Originally posted by lug:

Originally posted by C.Alexander Claber:

Originally posted by Bumpcity:

(and a lead guitar player who is stuck in 1987).

Indeed. It's like a disease!

 

Alex

I was in a band with myself and another late 30's guitarist plus a drummer and singer in their early 20's. It was ALWAYS a battle to get the guitardist (my brother-in-law) to play anything from the ninties and on. [...]
Reminds me of my friend, the classic rock g****rist that's also stuck in the 80s. He was giving g****r lessons recently to someone younger than him. He'd taught others to play, so this wasn't anything new; in fact, he was a teacher once and even had lesson plans and everything laid out. So they were getting into something -- I don't know what, probably scales, bends, slides, and other classic rock solo stuff -- and by the 3rd lesson the student quits. So my friend asks why, and the kid says, "all I wanted to know was what chord to play after C". :D:D:D
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Originally posted by C.Alexander Claber:

Originally posted by Bumpcity:

(and a lead guitar player who is stuck in 1987).

Indeed. It's like a disease!

 

Alex

Someone should call the CDC and quarantine the entire New York Metro Area. There are so many of them here I've considered writing to my Congressman about having them registered as a new religion - "the VanHalenites" - and have every Guitar Center and Sam Ash consecrated as their official church. :D
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Something I was thinking about. Is the genre of classic rock determined by a certain "generation" of rock music, such as 1962-1978, or rock music which passes a certain age (25 years?) or maybe just a certain style of rock music, which is played in the classic style, as baroque music is played in the baroque style/jazz, etc.?

 

A few years ago, this question would have seemed ludicrous, but as time progresses, a better definition should be put in place. Here, at my other job, they have the oldies station playing in the background. I just recently heard a U2 song off Joshua Tree, and My Maria by Brooks & Dunn. Now how do those pieces fit into oldies?

 

Just what we need, eh? Theology of music.

 

ATM

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Originally posted by ATM:

[...] or maybe just a certain style of rock music, which is played in the classic style [...]

This is my interpretation. As you know, it used to just be "rock" until the grunge movement finally gave way to something different enough that the two different styles needed to be divided into "classic" and "modern" rock. (Yeah, the MI probably uses more specific labels than these to sell product, but I think these are the general labels that I've seen around.)

 

Most radio stations saw a difference as early as the 80s, too. Some refused to play some of the newer stuff, hunkering down with their 60s and 70s playlists and adding the likes of Phil Collins or Billy Idol or Bon Jovi. Others seemed to add either the highly overproduced/synth 80s stuff OR 80s metal, but not both. In the 90s at least one local station switched from pop (Michael Jackson-esque) to grunge and whatever you call the post-grunge stuff; they kept 70s and 80s in their rotation but dropped the 60s. (Now I think they've dropped the 70s as well.)

 

Of course, everybody points to the punk movement as the reason why rock as we knew it in the 60s/70s became "dinosaur" rock (and now more kindly, classic rock).

 

Strangely, 50s music is still labeled from the decade it appeared, unless I'm missing someting?

 

Even my GarageBand software has built-in effects patchs for "classic", "glam", "Brit", and "modern" rock g****r, among others. Each has a characteristic sound. (Hours of fun to take a DI track and apply the various patches!) ;)

 

It's a strange concept, what with the whole "rock and roll will never die" thing, but look at what happened to big band and ragtime. I think it's safe to say it's happening again. Yes, I've heard the argument from local bands that all the gigs they get are for classic rock, but how many new artists are releasing (or being allowed to release) "classic rock" albums?

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Classic rock doesn't have the same pulling power/earning material in England. Funnily enough I grew up on it (Zep, Free, Cream, Hendrix, Santana) alongside my funk, reggae and other influences.

I'd never, ever played rock until recently and still - little of our current 70s covers setlist is what could be called classic rock in this sense - Santana, Hendrix and a few others.

In the UK, we've never really had the musically segregated radio that exists in the states - and growing up, we only had one rock radio show once a week.

Heavy rock and the varieties of metal are massive here - but in terms of the media are a very underground presence. The average pub crowd doesn't really go for it the way they appear to in the States.

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Interesting..... The last two bands I have worked with are different as night and day.. one was primarily country, and my current one is more into the "blues brothers", funk, soul, etc.

 

Thing is, both bands covered many of the same "classic rock" songs... First and foremost we play dance music... and folks want to hear the classic rock.. so why not??

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I would be in the NO camp. I just don't find it interesting to play another band's music to a bunch of drunks on a Friday or Saturday night. I mean, if I NEVER hear "Play 'Free Bird'" again it would still be too soon.

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I recently saw a sick band in long beach while sitting at a restaurant. The drummer killed on their latin sets, and the two guitarists had their acrylics in place and their flamenco chops down. The bass player was playing a sick 61 j bass through an eden wt800 and ea 110 cab(some thoroughly modern gear mixed in with some classics, no). He was laying down some sick flase and natural harmonics as well as some crazy syncopation in the songs, using machine like finger funk muting.......

The third song they played was long train running by the doobie brothers.....dig?

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