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Richie Kaye's video series on Singing and Playing as a Solo


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Hello, fellow performers, fans and students!

 

I've launched a video series for the solo singing guitarist, both professional and hobbyist, who'd like to know how another soloist goes about his work in rehearsal. The series takes the viewer through the determinations I make for each song I include in my repetoire. I'll cover topics such as choice of key, feel, meaning, vocal delivery, rehearsal and more.

 

Click here for the first episode:

 

Episode 1 on Vimeo

 

 

In music & mirth,

 

Richie Kaye

Richie Kaye Website

Latest album: BLAST-OFF!

In music & mirth,

 

Richie Kaye

www.richiekaye.com

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Welcome aboard Richie! I hope you will be sticking around and not just self promoting your album and other stuff. I went on YouTube and watched a couple of your videos and found them interesting and informative. I liked the lesson on how to smile when playing the guitar in front of an audience. I have mostly played solo (and a few bands). I enjoy making eye contact with an audience. I know that they can hear the difference when you look like you are not having a good time. I liked the vid with you and the clarinet player too! I'll be looking into your jazz standard chords and YT videos, as I enjoy picking on songs from the 30's and 40's era...along with 50's 60's 70's tunes like Scotch and Soda, Since I Fell For You, Ain't Misbehaving, Georgia, Desert Skies, old R&R, jazzing up some Hank Sr., etc. I'm just staying home and singing and chording for my own enjoyment these days. :cool:
Take care, Larryz
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A good topic and explaned well. Thanks for posting.

 

Decades ago I wrote a song in E, the signature riff requires an open string for the sound (I can play it in any key but something is lost without an open drone).

My band plays it. I moved it to A for the vocals. I am recording it, but a couple of days ago I realized I would really rather sing it in B for the recording.

 

Capo on the second fret, done. Now I have to put my baritone guitar back together and relearn the bass part on my fretless tuned BEAD.

A little extra work but it makes a big difference to me. One of the "luxuries" of having a home studio, I can just change lanes and shift gears.

It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
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Thank you so much Mr. Kaye! You exp lined that so well, played and sang beautifully too. You inspired me to learn the "The Nearness of You" and I am very much enjoying it!

 

One way I determine my key, is to try to find versions of the song by singers who sing more or less in my range. That usually gets me close. Sinatra is always good starting point for me. He sang the "Nearness of You " in D, a great key for guitar, but I probably take it up a bit.

 

Thanks again!

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To KuruPrionz, glad you found the video worthwhile. When I was younger, I used to say, "real men don't use capos," but I've changed my mind. When my voice was higher, I always played lower on the neck. But now that my voice has gone much deeper, I often like to play higher on the neck, but use the same chord forms. The juxtaposition of the frequencies usually helps to "open up" a song. I like to try the same song in several positions to get a feel for alternate ideas. And, once we master a few songs in this way, it becomes second nature, just as you've discovered. btw, I need a bari...

In music & mirth,

 

Richie Kaye

www.richiekaye.com

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To montunoman, AWESOME! Great to hear you're going to learn The Nearness of You. I'd like to suggest you take a listen to these versions, which I love. There are so many more fantastic renditions, if you'd like more, just ask!

 

Nat Cole (Easy pacing, light, upbeat)

 

Jo Stafford (as a ballad)

 

Connie Boswell (Lush, straight up)

 

Good thought to go for Francis. He was a bass, really, but with the tone of a tenor. Nat's version may also be in your range. Other singers with Francis's range: Arthur Prysock, Al Hibbler, Joe Williams.

In music & mirth,

 

Richie Kaye

www.richiekaye.com

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To KuruPrionz, glad you found the video worthwhile. When I was younger, I used to say, "real men don't use capos," but I've changed my mind. When my voice was higher, I always played lower on the neck. But now that my voice has gone much deeper, I often like to play higher on the neck, but use the same chord forms. The juxtaposition of the frequencies usually helps to "open up" a song. I like to try the same song in several positions to get a feel for alternate ideas. And, once we master a few songs in this way, it becomes second nature, just as you've discovered. btw, I need a bari...

 

 

My baritone is now up and running and just as fun as I remembered.

I surfed eBay and Reverb until a Warmoth baritone neck came up at a price I wanted to pay. I got a maple fretboard, already finished for arournd $150 but this was years ago. The finish is factory but has a couple of chips. I don't care!!!

 

What I like about the Warmoth neck is that it can be easily installed, adjusted and intonated on any Strat or Tele. You could convert a Squier, a real Fender or (in my case) a custom Frankenfender.

That versatility can put a good, solid, well-intonated baritone guitar into our hands at a budget price. Cheers, Kuru

It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
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To montunoman, AWESOME! Great to hear you're going to learn The Nearness of You. I'd like to suggest you take a listen to these versions, which I love. There are so many more fantastic renditions, if you'd like more, just ask!

 

Nat Cole (Easy pacing, light, upbeat)

 

Jo Stafford (as a ballad)

 

Connie Boswell (Lush, straight up)

 

Good thought to go for Francis. He was a bass, really, but with the tone of a tenor. Nat's version may also be in your range. Other singers with Francis's range: Arthur Prysock, Al Hibbler, Joe Williams.

 

Thank you Richie, I enjoyed the Nat Cole, jo Stafford, Connie Boswell versions very much. There's so many ways to interpret these great standards. I'm trying to do it as a bossa nova or maybe a bolero. Also I wanted to let you know I am enjoying your series on song interpretation, you have some really great insights. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

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When I was younger, I used to say, "real men don't use capos," but I've changed my mind.

 

Generally speaking, I don't use capos for live performance.

 

That said, nearly all of the time I am playing a Strat with a scalloped fretboard, imagine the tuning nightmare of putting a capo on!!!!!

Back when we had open mic nights, i usually took a 12 string so I would sound different. Those are not fun to capo when time is a considation either, open mic is hit and run for the most part.

 

The lead singer in my band does use a capo on some songs. I use them to reccord, if there is a certain sound that needs the shape and I need to play it higher for the vocal I will capo up. Open strings add a tone that fretted strings may not provide, even if it is a "simple" chord.

 

Plus, there is something about playing a baritone in B and a guitar with a capo on the 7th fret that just sounds awesome, another spice for the chef, another color for the painter.

So my only rule is "don't make rules." :laugh:

It took a chunk of my life to get here and I am still not sure where "here" is.
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@ Richie, I'm pretty much an anti-capo kind of guy. For me, it's cutting off part of the neck for my scale work, even when it's placed on the lowest 1st fret position LOL! But I do appreciate some of the sweetest sounds you can get using a capo as Kuru suggests. I enjoyed your lesson on picking a key and I can also see where a capo can come in handy for keeping the chords you prefer when transposing to a new key. I know the importance of being able to hit that high note when it shows up somewhere in the chorus! I find my lower vocal notes are having a little bit of trouble as I get older too. I'm not opposed to changing the original vocal notes and even chords to a song, if I can make it sound good and if it pleases me. If I can't hit that certain high note in any key, I'll pass on that particular tune. I like singing Route 66 in G# but my harmonica player refuses to buy a harp for just one tune, so I just do it in G LOL! There is one tune I love that I have to pass on, and that's the final note of Running Scared by Roy Orbison! :cool:
Take care, Larryz
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  • 1 month later...
Capos were always made poorly, at least the ones I used way back when. Even now, the capos I've tried have never applied pressure equally across the fingerboard, except for Thalia. Thalia is making them much better and I find, once I use the right grommet size (they give you several from which to choose), I get a clean tone and equal applied force for accurate pitch. And if they read this and want an artist recommendation, please contact me. ;-)

In music & mirth,

 

Richie Kaye

www.richiekaye.com

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