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Is a sliding capo a decent one? or what is a good one


PRS MAN

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i am looking for a good capo, everyone said i should have bought that with my guitar, but i did not listen and have spent like a thousand bucks on pedals and stuff so no i am looking at a capo and i have found this http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Glider-GL1-Glider-Capo?sku=361650

but i have heard that you should buy the clamp kind but i dont know,

_____DISCIPLE_ROCKS_____

PAUL REED SMITH GUITARS 4 EVER

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I never use any of them...and even call them cheater bars...but that's just me and will admit I've heard some wonderful music played by those that use them...

 

That really is a misconception. A capo allows you to play songs that are physically impossible to play, without a capo. It's sort of like refusing to change the tuning of your guitar to an open G for a song, because changing the tuning is "cheating".

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I never use any of them...and even call them cheater bars...but that's just me and will admit I've heard some wonderful music played by those that use them...

 

That really is a misconception. A capo allows you to play songs that are physically impossible to play, without a capo. It's sort of like refusing to change the tuning of your guitar to an open G for a song, because changing the tuning is "cheating".

 

Try tuning to Open-G or Open-D, and then put a capo way up on the 7th or 9th fret; way cool sounds!

 

It's not to take the place of being able to barre or otherwise play chords correctly, it's just to transpose what the available open strings' pitches are. Just a tool.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Absolutely, but there is a misconception that it replaces barring and that just isn't true.

 

There are songs where you will be playing chords on a higher fret, with a capo on the lower fret and there is no way you could barre the low fret and still play the chords.

 

When you have transcribed a song with lots of changes and chords like..., let's say a "D position" D chord, up to a "D position" B chord on the 11th fret, there is just no way to do that with out the use of a capo.

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Kayser, yeah. They even make one to simulate an open tuning.

 

In terms of using a capo, I use it to change the voicing of the guitar. On a recording a year or so ago, I capoed to the 4th or 5th fret on my Firebird 12 string, and played an arpeggioed part behind the existing instruments, transposing to the proper chords at that barre to get a different voice. It was way cool. One thinks of George Harrision's "Here Comes The Sun" as a good demo of capo work. And it sure is cheaper than buying a Baby Taylor or something to get to that higher register without a capo.

 

There is also a guy who used multiple capos as a part of his act... probably on Youtube somewhere. Cool to watch once or twice. Not something I'd want to do, but fun to see.

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Oops! I misspelled that (and so did most of us here above), it's "Kyser". Just in case anybody tries to search 'em up...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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I have been known to use capos, but have never been dependent on them. I can see that there are situations where they are very useful.... say playing acoustic twelve-string all night, LOL!

 

I once saw a guy use a sliding capo and he did a great job playing rhythm guitar. I asked him about it and I guess he's physically incapable of playing barre chords. I don't know what brand it was.

 

There is a partial capo, the Third Hand, with 6 rollers so you choose which strings you want to capo. Chris Proctor and other fingerstylists use it. I have one but never used it much, but it IS a cool idea!

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I use a G7 Capo and absolutely swear by it. Best capo I have used by far, but YMMV! All the best!

 

 

Jason Sadites

www.sadites.com

New CD 'WEVE' available now! Featuring performances by: Tony Levin, Kenny Aronoff, Marco Minnemann, Brett Garsed, Gregg and Matt Bissonette, Chad Wackerman and more!

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i acutlly saw that one when i was looking but the reviews on musicians friend said it was a piece of junk, have you had any problems with yours the little bit you have used it?

 

_____DISCIPLE_ROCKS_____

PAUL REED SMITH GUITARS 4 EVER

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I never use any of them...and even call them cheater bars...but that's just me and will admit I've heard some wonderful music played by those that use them...

 

That really is a misconception. A capo allows you to play songs that are physically impossible to play, without a capo. It's sort of like refusing to change the tuning of your guitar to an open G for a song, because changing the tuning is "cheating".

 

I don't see any misconception...I don't care to use them, nor do I care to use open G or anything but standard tuning...but that's just me...and as I said, those that use capos and I'll include altered tunings play some beautiful music...I jokingly call them cheater bars as a lot of open chord players can't get past being a C F and G'er without them...

Take care, Larryz
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First, capos are a tool. If you choose to use that tool so be it, if not, so be it. But to be clear, Larry (and not being irate about this, either) a capo is a great utility for instant transposition... or would you rather try to play an intricate arrangement in a different key with vastly different fingerings on the fly? ;)

 

I use a full complement of capos for a variety of purposes. I'll post the pic of them when I find it. For now, know I use Kyser capos 90% of the time but enjoy my Glider. It's indespensible for playing "Your Smiling Face" by James Taylor as it modulates up a step twice. Sure, I could re-arrange it for the various keys but I feel no need to as moving the capo is James' preferred method of playing the song and he does just fine. Of course, he has a band playing over his change so he can quickly move his Kyser. ;)

 

An important note about Kyser and other "clamp" styled capos. You must be careful placing them or you'll knock your axe out of tune and put excess pressure on frets which can put undo wear on those frets. Steve Wilkinson of The Wilkinsons country act had to have his acoustic frets repaired in 2001, just before I came on the tour, because he tore some up clamping and un-clamping his Kyser.

 

...There is a partial capo, the Third Hand, with 6 rollers so you choose which strings you want to capo. Chris Proctor and other fingerstylists use it. I have one but never used it much, but it IS a cool idea!

 

I, like you, Eric, rarely use my Third Hand capo but am glad to have it. One note. The inventor of the Third Hand espouses creating tunings with the Third Hand capo but then cuts another capo to recreate the choice of cams holding strings as the Third Hand can be very unstable when only using a few cams at once. Many years ago, long before Kyser and others manufactured them, I cut a Dunlop Trigger capo to allow for covering either strings 2, 3 & 4 or 3, 4 & 5. The former creates an open A chord, the latter an Esus4.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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I'm with everyone on the Capo concept and it's a great subject Fantasticsound...I have have some buds that play acoustics, slide and 12 strings and all use Capo's...the 12 string player loves open chords and is limited in the bar chord arena and loves to capo all over the place..the capo is a great tool for 12 strings (even ones with close actions) as that index finger gets sore playing bar chords all night...the slide player uses 3 guitars/resonators in 3 different tunings and capos all over the place too and the other acoustic player is capo'ing to beat the band and between them both I just forget about playing chords and keep up with the changes by playing scale riffs and fills on the fly to keep up with them...as they have the advantage of playing together for many years on the complex stuff...3 banger blues, I'll go back to playing chords but I love playing with all of them and tease them on using Cheater Bars...

 

I have seen guys drop tune a half step down and then use a capo on the first fret just to lower their action...also Fender recommends using a capo on the 1st fret when adjusting string height on the electrics...so it can be just a tool...or as A String indicates their are some sounds you just can't get without a Capo...

 

On the original post, I gave a sliding Capo to the Slide guy and haven's seen him use it yet..he likes the regular firm fitting ones best...the 12 string guy uses the roller type and Capos all over the place just to match his voice for fast transposing to different keys...

 

anyway, Capo on guys and keep making great music..

 

:rawk:

Take care, Larryz
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