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guitar problems


mongo

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so after 5 months of haveing my gibson v the 600 dollar one its and amazing guitar but one flaw it scrathes way to easy when i had it for about 2 months i relized alot of scrathes but i was assuming the music store .....im thinking off painting it but i dont know if it would be worth it what do you think
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scratches as in pick scratches.. or you dinging the thing up on accident?

 

Honestly I wouldnt bother refinishing the guitar if it doesnt bother the playability. You may have scratches and stuff, but even if you paint it, most likely your going to end up with those same scratches and dings again since you had it for only 2 months and its in that condition..

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*DON'T* paint it - that will ruin its value forever.

 

Providing a guitar has good tone & plays well, professional guitarists will put up with a lot in the way of dings & scratches.

 

G.

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Things like that give your guitar character. Look at some of the beat up guitars you've seen the pros playing. Think Stevie Ray Vaughan, Eddie Van Halen, Eric Clapton, John Sykes, etc.

 

It shows your guitar has been played a lot (and that's what it's all about.) You ought to see my Tele. I bought it brand new in '99 and its now got a lot of scratches and several dings. It also plays and sounds great.

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Originally posted by mongo:

so after 5 months of haveing my gibson v the 600 dollar one its and amazing guitar but one flaw it scrathes way to easy when i had it for about 2 months i relized alot of scrathes but i was assuming the music store .....im thinking off painting it but i dont know if it would be worth it what do you think

Did you buy it new? If so, the warranty is still valid, right? DON'T VOID YOUR WARRANTY.

 

Some dings and scratches are to be expected, and are generally accepted as part-&-parcel of both playing, and the type of finishes that often are best for wooden musical instruments. (Too hard 'n' heavy of a finish can damp vibration, and can be more difficult to repair.)

 

It probably has a nitrocellulose-lacquer (depending on what model of Gibson it is), which is pretty easily fixed-up by a qualified, experienced professional, as far as dings, dents, and scratches go. It is specialized, skilled work, though, so don't expect it to be too cheap.

 

Re-finishing ("painting") it would be excessively unnecesary, and much more expensive.

 

Check out the following books and 'sites, if you've got a D.I.Y.-Jones (again, though, DON'T void your warranty):

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif The Guitar Player Repair Guide by Dan Erlewine (HIGHLY recommended!!) http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon14.gif

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Guitar Finishing Step-By-Step

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Re Ranch guitar refinishing \'site

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Guitar Refinishing Forum \'site

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Originally posted by Geoff Byrne:

*DON'T* paint it - that will ruin its value forever.

 

Providing a guitar has good tone & plays well, professional guitarists will put up with a lot in the way of dings & scratches.

 

G.

A+

As a side note- maybe you should keep it in the case when you aren't using it.

"Who's gonna teach the children about Chuck Berry?"
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What Caevan said, plus, Gibson uses nitrocellulose on just about every electric guitar for two reasons; 1. Sound quality 2. Heritage

 

The former is believed to be true because nitrocellulose, which is more difficult to deal with at the manufacturers end, allows the tonewood below to breathe more than rigid polyurethane and other finishes.

 

The latter allows Gibson to charge a premium on their instruments because they're being built in using methods going back to their beginnings and encompassing all the great vintage instruments of their past.

 

Either way, the last thing you want to do is ruin the existing finish by painting it with something handy. If you do want it refinished, take it to a pro who knows his/her way around nitrocellulose. Gibson Customer Support will be happy to help you find an authorized repair service.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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Originally posted by Lancer:

Perhaps you can look into some of these new "so called" miracle scratch fixers products. I suggest that you check with an auto body shop and get their opinion. You may be able to fix it up without a paint job.

As a matter of fact, Fender contracted MaGuires'- famed for their car-finish care products- to formulate their recent guitar polish kit...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Originally posted by marvar:

Originally posted by Geoff Byrne:

*DON'T* paint it - that will ruin its value forever.

 

Providing a guitar has good tone & plays well, professional guitarists will put up with a lot in the way of dings & scratches.

 

G.

A+

As a side note- maybe you should keep it in the case when you aren't using it.

Agreed. No matter how sweet it looks sitting on a stand in your playing area, you should always keep it in the case when not playing. Besides offering protection from wayward Squiers it'll act as a buffer to the elements, protecting your axe from sudden rises and drops in humidity, the true nemesis of any guitar. Unless your studio area is climate controlled around 50% humidity, but most aren't unless your name is Bob Taylor, keep it cased.

 

In addition, painting would change the tone of the guitar, and depending on the type of paint and the thickness of the coat, you might trap and muffle some of it's sonic beauty. Now, I'm not saying not to paint it, but to be aware of the changes it will inevitably cause.

 

Cheers...

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