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READ THIS BEFORE YOU BUY A NEW CAR!


BiC

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Sorry if any of you are in auto sales! ;)

 

I was introduced to this site a few years ago. I did go as far as ordering their reports which includes info. the dealer doesn't want you to know about to include "holdback". Once you know a vehicle's holdback, you can deal below the invoice price! They were packed full of info. that would have saved me thousands of $$$ had I purchased a vehicle.

 

2. The Fighting Chance "Big Picture" analysis of how the manufacturer(s) and the specific model(s) you're interested in have been doing in the market, updated every couple of months.

Are your vehicle's sales up or down or sideways? Does the average dealer sell a lot or just a few each month? For most popular vehicles, these two-to-eight page summaries also include the actual transaction prices (in relation to dealer invoice) reported by Fighting Chance customers across the country, to give you a target range for your own negotiations. (Simply having the dealer invoice price often tells you nothing. For some vehicles, $2,000 over invoice would be a terrific price; for others, $200 over invoice would be a terrible deal.) We also tell you the current information on holdback, additional profit that most manufacturers build into the invoice price, then return later to the dealer. (Some of the holdback information on "free" automotive web sites is not current.)

 

Don't let this happen to you:

 

A customer emailed us an order from this web site, then canceled his order by email the next day, saying,"I found the pricing information on the Internet, and I contacted Autobytel.com and the dealer gave me a great deal, just $500 over invoice." Some great deal! That poor guy really got taken! He would have learned from our package that more than half of our customers were routinely buying that vehicle for less than the invoice price ? up to $1,000 less ? obviously because there was hidden dealer cash that was turned up by the "fax attack." The bottom line: he was a lamb led to slaughter, probably paying at least $1,000 more than he should have. (Incidentally, research indicates that only one in five people who get a quote from Autobytel or any of the other Internet buying services actually buys a car from them. That's because their deals frequently aren't that great. The reason: It's not a competitive selling situation. You will typically hear from just one dealer, who has paid for the exclusive right to all calls from your zip code or telephone zone.)

Click on the site, and read what they have to offer as far as tips on purchasing that new car, to include utilizing the "fax attack" method.

 

CLICK

 

Peace :)

"Treat your wife with honor, respect, and understanding as you live together so that you can pray effectively as husband and wife." 1 Peter 3:7

 

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Here's what I did to buy my last new car:

 

Went to the dealer's lot and picked out a car, without any help.

 

Went back to work, called the dealer, and asked for the Fleet Manager.

 

Asked the Fleet Manager to fax me the invoice for that car so my company could make an offer.

 

Got the fax, crossed off the invoice price, wrote an offer $500 below that invoice price, and faxed it back.

 

The phone rings in 30 seconds. Sherman, the FM, says he can't do it for that but he can do it for his invoice cost. I say "Deal" and come down after work with my pre-approved financing in hand.

 

He made money with his spiff from the manufacturer, more income per minute spent on this deal than most of us will ever earn. The dealer was Flooring the car: the manufacturer's bank was in effect leasing it to the dealer until they sold it, so the dealer stopped throwing money away. The dealer also gets volume discounts that each car contributes to.

 

My current advice: never buy a new car. Buy late model used, letting the first owner or lease-holder take the depreciation hit. And if you are really disciplined, only buy a car you can pay for in cash.

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Originally posted by Doug Osborne:

 

My current advice: never buy a new car. Buy late model used, letting the first owner or lease-holder take the depreciation hit. And if you are really disciplined, only buy a car you can pay for in cash.

_______________________

 

Personally, I would not buy a new car. As you said, I would buy one that was 1 or 2 years old so the original buyer would take the depreciation.

 

But for those who desire a brand spank'n new car, Fighting Chance can save you big bucks.

 

Peace :)

"Treat your wife with honor, respect, and understanding as you live together so that you can pray effectively as husband and wife." 1 Peter 3:7

 

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