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single cut vs duel cut...


BenderOfStrings

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Being a Les Paul owner, I KNOW this is going to sound like a strange question coming from me. But why is it that some players would actually PREFER a singlecut guitar over duel? Why would you purposely choose a guitar that limits your range at the higher frets??

 

Is it strictly a 'tone' thing or do playing styles actually dictate whether someone would choose a single cut over duel? Could it be strictly a cosmetics thing? Do some prefer them over another because of looks??

 

For me personally, most of my guitar gods were les paul players (Ace Frehley, Joe Perry, Jimmy Page, Gary Rossington, etc) which is what inspired me to play an LP.

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The extra wood will provide more sustain, and (some believe) a better tone. I'll just say that it will change the tone a little.

I don't know that I've ever noticed a double-cut gives me any easier access on the upper frets. I don't really go over the top of the neck for anything.

 

I think a lot of it is a cosmetic preference, combined with the fact that people will just prefer a guitar that feels right to them and sounds good to them.

 

My $.02

May all your thoughts be random!

- Neil

www.McFaddenArts.com

www.MikesGarageRocks.com

 

 

 

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i admired les paul players and liked the dual humbucker sound of Ace and Warren haynes as well as tons of other players. so that could be why i have two single cutaway guitars. i do find it somewhat constricting to play at higher positions. its not just looks, but if my yamaha was ugly i wouldn't have gotten it. its a combo of things for me. i like to keep it simple so 2 humbuckers or p90's with a solid bridge is good for me. it does add a certain warmth to the sound. but the main reason i have the godin and yamaha is because of bang for the buck.

there , i am no help am i?

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Originally posted by Guitarzan:

i admired les paul players and liked the dual humbucker sound of Ace and Warren haynes as well as tons of other players. so that could be why i have two single cutaway guitars. i do find it somewhat constricting to play at higher positions. its not just looks, but if my yamaha was ugly i wouldn't have gotten it. its a combo of things for me. i like to keep it simple so 2 humbuckers or p90's with a solid bridge is good for me. it does add a certain warmth to the sound. but the main reason i have the godin and yamaha is because of bang for the buck.

there , i am no help am i?

No no! Keep 'em coming! I like hearing the different reasons from different players.
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I would choose it based on looks hehe, but thats just me, I wish I had a les paul :( but yeah another thing regarding what billster said about the thumb behind the neck rather than on top of it, ive seen many guitarist do this, I sort of combine both things, but ive seen many professionals put their thumb on top of the neck (kirk hammet, steve vai, etc.) maybe they just have long fingers but yeah i was wondering which is better, or is it biased based on the person.
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Why would you purposely choose a guitar that limits your range at the higher frets??

I'm sorry...but WHAT THE????

 

Dude, where is your thumb?

I think this might be a technique issue, rather than a build issue.

 

I'm not so sure about the wood=tone issue, as I've played some pretty thin sounding LP's, especially clean.

Ditto for dbl cutaways.

How can we fight ignorance and apathy?

Who knows! Who cares!

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Originally posted by Peemonkey:

...another thing regarding what billster said about the thumb behind the neck rather than on top of it, ive seen many guitarist do this, I sort of combine both things, but ive seen many professionals put their thumb on top of the neck (kirk hammet, steve vai, etc.) maybe they just have long fingers but yeah i was wondering which is better, or is it biased based on the person.

I was taught (and it proves itself) that you will be much more versatile with yuor thumb behind the neck. I do sometimes get the thumb up there around the top to grab a big bend, but you are going to be a lot more maneuverable with the thumb in the center of the back of the neck. It lets you pivot easily, your fingers are up on their tips and not flat across the strings. I don't think finger length has much effect on ability to do this. As a matter of fact, the increased mobility and finger independence allowed by (dare I say) proper thumb position helps overcome what you might consider small hands. End of sermon. ;)

 

You want to see something else - check out Hendrix fretting with his thumb in some pictures!

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when i am in the nut to 7th fret area i occasionally have my thumb over the top to fret notes on the low E while i play double stops on other strings, but i move it back as i climb. i would have a hard time playing a single cut guitar above the 12th fret if i had it hanging around my knees like Jimmy Page. but if you wear it higher there should be no problem getting up there.
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Yeah, I feel more comfy in the upper reaches of the fretboard on my Les Paul than I do on many a Strat; their cutaway is so smoothly executed, I sometimes just feel around in there for the sheer tactile pleasure of it!

 

Even though they'er "single cuts", a Tele has a very similar profile to a Strat's, where the neck/body joint is concerned. Just about the same amount of wood is out there in free space. On a Les Paul or Gretch single-cut, for instance, the single-cut design makes for a somewhat stiffer neck (pottentially), and the harmonic overtone series that the neck can potentially sympathetically vibrate to is different from that of a Tele or a Strat. Of course, much of this also depends on the pieces of wood and tightness of the neck-joint, etc. But it can and does come into play...

 

I'd even take a NO-cutaway Les Paul, though, if it was a good one! Same with acoustic flat-tops. I can live with less access to weedly-deedly land if the rest of the geography is sound.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Originally posted by Caevan O'Shite:

Yeah, I feel more comfy in the upper reaches of the fretboard on my Les Paul than I do on many a Strat; their cutaway is so smoothly executed, I sometimes just feel around in there for the sheer tactile pleasure of it!

TMI!!TMI!!TMI!!!
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Oh! O.K., gotcha!

 

Just noticed that I typed, "stimped", instead of "stumped"... I kinda like that, it's kinda a cool Freudian slap, don'tcha think, Mr. Hoek?

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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