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Miles Davis Chord Changes


hermanjoe

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I have just transcribed Herbie Hancock's Piano solo on the Wayne shorter tune "Orbits." This is the first tune on the Miles Smiles album. I have the entire solo which is only right hand, but I can't get the chord changes. The lead sheet in the real book is wrong.

Does anyone have accurate changes for the solo section of that tune or know where I could get them?

 

Any help would be great.

 

Thanks

"Learn the changes, then forget them."

 

-Charlie Parker

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Ok heres a little more info on the tune. There is a lead sheet in the 1st non-legal real book that has the correct melody and false changes.

The album is called MIles Smiles and is by Mailes Davis.

The players are Miles, Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, and Tony Williams.

I believe the album was originally released in 1965.

"Learn the changes, then forget them."

 

-Charlie Parker

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Can you point me to an mp3 of the tune, or would that present legal issues?

 

Kirk

Reality is like the sun - you can block it out for a time but it ain't goin' away...
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I have the cd and mp3 on my computer which I paid for. But I don't know if I can post it, because it's not my music. Don't know if thats against the rules here. Guess we'll have to ask DB.

"Learn the changes, then forget them."

 

-Charlie Parker

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I have not looked at Orbits in years, those changes in the old Real Book were so awkward! You are probably right, they are probably wrong. I do play Shorter's "Prince Of Darkness" from the old Real Book.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Find 700 of Harry’s piano arrangements of standards for educational purposes and jazz piano tutorials at www.Patreon.com/HarryLikas

 

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I listened again to Shorter's 'Orbits' on 'Miles Smiles' and are there any changes at all? Hancock plays minimal, his sparse or nonexistent comping during Davis and Shorter's solos frees up the harmony and lets the soloists play whatever they want. Herbie doesn't really comp, he plays like a third horn. The relative absence of the piano also contributes to the dry, skeletal sound of the album. Shorter thrives in this setting, whereas Miles provides some of the most exciting, virtuosic playing of his career.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Find 700 of Harry’s piano arrangements of standards for educational purposes and jazz piano tutorials at www.Patreon.com/HarryLikas

 

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http://cva.ahk.nl/tvm/volume8.html

"Motivic and Formal Improvisation in the Miles Davis Quintet 1965-1968

The paper examines transcriptions of improvisations from two recordings by the Miles Davis Quintet from 1965-1968, Orbits and Pinocchio. These recordings are significant since the group preserves a 4/4 meter but abandons an underlying form during the solos. In the absence of the underlying formal divisions, harmonic progression, and hypermeter characteristic of strophic form improvisation, the improvisors rely instead on motivic cues to articulate form between and within improvisations. The paper reveals motivic connections, discusses the role of group interaction in bringing about motivic transformations, and examines the larger implications for form during the improvisations."

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Find 700 of Harry’s piano arrangements of standards for educational purposes and jazz piano tutorials at www.Patreon.com/HarryLikas

 

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http://www.jr.com/JRProductPage.process?Product=3914434

"Performances such as "Orbits" and "Ginger Bread Boy" redefine all notions of swing, as Ron Carter and Tony Williams treat the beat in a free-flowing manner, superimposing new chords and meters over a fulminating 4/4 pulse. Pianist Hancock veers away from traditional block chord accompaniments, often providing spare polytonal counterpoint or laying out altogether. "

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Find 700 of Harry’s piano arrangements of standards for educational purposes and jazz piano tutorials at www.Patreon.com/HarryLikas

 

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posted 07-19-2004 01:01 AM                      

http://cva.ahk.nl/tvm/volume8.html

"Motivic and Formal Improvisation in the Miles Davis Quintet 1965-1968

Jazz +

 

Can I buy this paper, or read it in full? Seems really interesting. From what I gather there are no changes at all and its very free formed. Then at the end of each solo the players give the 8 bar que to the next soloist. It makes sence in a way. A lot of Herbie's lines are very outside anything. Very chromatic, and diminished.

"Learn the changes, then forget them."

 

-Charlie Parker

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I don't know if you can get that paper, I found it with Google.

Harry Likas was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book." Find 700 of Harry’s piano arrangements of standards for educational purposes and jazz piano tutorials at www.Patreon.com/HarryLikas

 

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